32 found
Order:
  1. Jay Schulkin (2012). Naturalism and Pragmatism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Naturalism and_Pragmatism offers reflections on the pragmatic tradition from a fresh perspective: that of a working neuroscientist. Though naturalism and evolution are not the only topics of discussions, they are important themes of the book. Both pragmatism and modern behavioural science grew up in the wake of Darwin's theory of evolution. Indeed it is impossible to imagine either without evolutionary theory and the more general nineteenth-century trend of naturalism from which modern evolutionary theory emerged. And yet, for a variety of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  25
    Patrick A. Heelan & Jay Schulkin (1998). Hermeneutical Philosophy and Pragmatism: A Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Synthese 115 (3):269-302.
    Two philosophical traditions with much in common, (classical) pragmatism and (Heidegger's) hermeneutic philosophy, are here\ncompared with respect to their approach to the philosophy of science. Both emphasize action as a mode of interpreting experience.\nBoth have developed important categories – inquiry, meaning, theory, praxis, coping, historicity, life-world – and each has\noffered an alternative to the more traditional philosophies of science stemming from Descartes, Hume, and Comte. Pragmatism's\nabduction works with the dual perspectives of theory (as explanation) and praxis (as culture). The hermeneutical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  3. Jay Schulkin (2004). Bodily Sensibility: Intelligent Action. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Although we usually identify our abilities to reason, to adapt to situations, and to solve problems with the mind, recent research has shown that we should not, in fact, detach these abilities from the body. This work provides an integrative framework for understanding how these abilities are affected by visceral reactions. Schulkin presents provocative neuroscientific research demonstrating that thought is not on one side and bodily sensibility on the other; from a biological point of view, they are integrated. Schulkin further (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  2
    W. Gerrod Parrott & Jay Schulkin (1993). Neuropsychology and the Cognitive Nature of the Emotions. Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):43-59.
  5.  13
    Jay Schulkin (1991). Science and Human Rights. World Futures 32 (4):243-253.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  7
    Jay Schulkin (1998). Evolving Sensibilities of Our Conception of Nature. Process Studies 27 (3/4):241-254.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  6
    Jay Schulkin (2000). Theory of Mind and Mirroring Neurons. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (7):252-254.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  42
    Jay Schulkin (2001). Psychobiological Basis of Empathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):46-47.
    Empathy represents one of the basic forms of human expression. Empathy evolved to facilitate social behavior. The perception action model, extended to empathy, is an exciting paradigm in which to undertake contemporary cognitive and comparative neuroscience. It renders the perception of events as an active affair, both when watching others, and when performing actions.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  4
    W. Gerrod Parrott & Jay Schulkin (1993). What Sort of System Could an Affective System Be? A Reply to LeDoux. Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):65-69.
  10.  4
    Jay Schulkin (2001). Where Intention is Born. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (12):547.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  9
    Michael Colby & Jay Schulkin (1992). ECO-Logic: The Evolution of a Philosophy and Economics of Nature. World Futures 33 (4):239-252.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  26
    Jonathan Baron & Jay Schulkin (1995). The Problem of Global Warming From a Decision-Theoretic Perspective. Social Epistemology 9 (4):353 – 368.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  23
    Jay Schulkin (2006). Cognitive Functions, Bodily Sensibility and the Brain. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):341-349.
    Body representations traverse the whole of the brain. They provide vital sources of information for every facet of an animal’s behavior, and such direct neural connectivity of visceral input throughout the nervous system demonstrates just how strongly cognitive systems are linked to bodily representations. At each level of the neural axis there are visceral appraisal systems that are integral in the organization of action. Cognition is not one side of a divide and viscera the other, with action merely a reflexive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  7
    Jonathan Baron & Jay Schulkin (forthcoming). Decision-Making and the Threat of Global Warming. Social Epistemology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  21
    Jay Schulkin (2007). An Instinct for Spiritual Quests: Quiet Religion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (4):pp. 307-320.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  21
    Jay Schulkin (2007). Effort and Will: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Mind and Matter 5 (1):111-126.
    Earlier views associated cognition with the cortex, and the will with sub-cortical non-cognitive structures. But an emerging perspective is that cognition runs throughout the central nervous sys- tem, including areas typically linked to motor control. It is an important realization that perceptual/effector systems are pregnant with cognitive resources. Staying the course to achieve one 's goals amidst diverse pulls is the primary function of the will. One adaptation is to pre-commit oneself to future recursive actions consistent with one's plans. Diverse (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  20
    John Sabini & Jay Schulkin (1994). Biological Realism and Social Constructivism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):207–217.
    In this paper we attempt to reconcile two important, current intellectual traditions: Darwinism and social constructionism. We believe that these two schools have important points of contact that have been obscured because each school has feared that the other wanted to put it out of business. We try to show that both traditions have much to of offer psychology, a discipline that has often been too individualistic, too concerned with the private and the subjective. The spirit of American pragmatism can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  4
    Jay Schulkin (2009). Life Experiences and Educational Sensibilities. Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (2):137-163.
    The human adventure in education is one of imperfect expression, punctuated by moments of insight. Education cultivates these epiphanies and nurtures their possible continuation. But even without major or minor insights, education cultivates the appreciation of the good, the beautiful, and the true. An experimentalist's sensibility lies amid the humanist's grasp of the myriad ways of trying to understand our existence. To bridge discourse is to appreciate the languages of other cultures, which reveal the nuances of life and experience.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  8
    Jay Schulkin (1988). Intelligence and Rationality in Evolution and Culture. World Futures 23 (4):275-289.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  8
    Jay Schulkin (1989). Evolutionary Conceptions of Adaptation and Brain Design. World Futures 27 (1):1-15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  9
    Jay Schulkin (2005). Moral Sensibility,Visceral Representations,and Social Cohesion: A Behavioral Neuroscience Perspective. Mind and Matter 3 (1):31-56.
    The moral sentiments adumbrated by Adam Smith and Charles Darwin reflect some of our basic social appraisals of each other. One set of moral appraisals reflects disgust and withdrawal, a form of contempt. Another set of moral appraisals reflects active concern responses, an appreciation of the experiences (sympathy for some- one)of other individuals and approach related behaviors. While no one set of neural structures is designed for only moral appraisals, a diverse set of neural regions that include the gustatory/visceral neural (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Jay Schulkin (2008). Cognitive Adaptation: Insights From a Pragmatist Perspective. Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):39-59.
    Classical pragmatism construed mind as an adaptive organ rooted in biology; biology was not one side and culture on the other. The cognitive systems underlie adaptation in response to the precarious and in the search for the stable and more secure that result in diverse forms of inquiry. Cognitive systems are rooted in action, and classical pragmatism knotted our sense of ourselves in response to nature and our cultural evolution. Cognitive systems should be demythologized away from Cartesian detachment, and towards (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  2
    Jay Schulkin (2013). Inquiry, Vision and Objects: Foraging for Coherence Within Neuroscience. Human Affairs 23 (4):616-632.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    Jay Schulkin (2008). Hormone Therapy, Dilemmas, Medical Decisions. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (1):73-88.
    The decision for women to go on hormone therapy remains controversial. An historical oscillation of beliefs exists related in part to expectations of the medicinal value of HT over longer-term use beyond the initial peri-menonpausal period. Studies thought to resolve issues surrounding the efficacy of HT were perhaps overstated as confusion still permeates the decision making with regard to HT. Overzealous advertising and exaggerated understanding of the results undermine patient and physician decision making. There remains no magic bullet with regard (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    Jay Schulkin (2008). Cephalic Organization: Animacy and Agency. Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):61-77.
    Humans come prepared to recognize two fundamental features of our surroundings: animate objects and agents. This recognition begins early in ontogeny and pervades our ecological and social space. This cognitive capacity reveals an important adaptation and sets the conditions for pervasive shared experiences. One feature of our species and our evolved cephalic substrates is that we are prepared to recognize self-propelled action in others. Our cultural evolution is knotted to an expanding sense of shared experiences.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Jay Schulkin & Patrick Heelan (2012). Action and Cephalic Expression : Hermeneutical Pragmatism. In New Directions in Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Adaptation and Cephalic Expression. Palgrave Macmillan
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Jay Schulkin (2006). Aesthetic Experience and the Neurobiology of Inquiry. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub.
  28. Jay Schulkin (ed.) (2012). Action, Perception and the Brain: Adaptation and Cephalic Expression. Palgrave Macmillan.
  29. Jay Schulkin (2008). Hormone Therapy, Dilemmas, Medical Decisions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):73-88.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Jay Schulkin (ed.) (2012). New Directions in Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Adaptation and Cephalic Expression. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Jay Schulkin & Robert Neville (1983). Responsibility, Rehabilitation, and Drugs: Health Care Dilemmas. In Catherine P. Murphy & Howard Hunter (eds.), Ethical Problems in the Nurse-Patient Relationship. Allyn and Bacon 167--182.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  1
    Jay Schulkin (1992). The Pursuit of Inquiry. State University of New York Press.
    Shulkin interweaves his dual backgrounds in neurobiological sciences and American pragmatic philosophy to argue that reason is inquiry, an engagement of reality, and can be described in the same terms a scientist uses when conducting and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography