61 found
Order:
  1. Jean Bethke Elshtain & David E. Decosse (2006). Public Man, Private Woman: Women in Social and Political Thought. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339-369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  2. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2002). LUTHER'S LAMB: When and How to Fight a Just War. Common Knowledge 8 (2):304-309.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1998). Augustine and the Limits of Politics. University of Notre Dame Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  4. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1985). Reflections on War and Political Discourse: Realism, Just War, and Feminism in a Nuclear Age. Political Theory 13 (1):39-57.
  5. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1988). Women and War. Ethics 98 (3):609-610.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  6. Alexander Astin, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Cary J. Nederman, Walter Nicgorski, Michael J. Sandel, Nathan Tarcov, John von Heyking & Alan Wolfe (2002). Cultivating Citizens: Soulcraft and Citizenship in Contemporary America. Lexington Books.
    In Cultivating Citizens Dwight Allman and Michael Beaty bring together some of America's leading social and political thinkers to address the question of civic vitality in contemporary American society. The resulting volume is a serious reflection on the history of civil society and a rich and rewarding conversation about the future American civic order.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  7.  39
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2008). Why Science Cannot Stand Alone. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):161-169.
    In an era in which certain arenas of scientific research have become increasingly controversial, this article critically evaluates what it means to “believe in science.” Many scientists today seem to claim a sovereign right to no political interference under the rubric of freedom. This article questions such a notion, and explores the dominance of science and the silencing of moral voices by undertaking two brief investigations—the first into National Socialist Germany, which insisted that it was defined by “applied biology,” and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2004). Jane Addams and the Dream of American Democracy. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 25 (1):97-101.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  9. Stephen Carter, William Dean, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Robin W. Lovin & Cornel West (1997). The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):367-392.
    Recent critics have called attention to the alienation of contemporary academics from broad currents of intellectual activity in public culture. The general complaint is that intellectuals are finding a professional home in institutions of higher learning, insulated from the concerns and interests of a wider reading audience. The demands of professional expertise do not encourage academics to work as public intellectuals or to take up social, literary, or political matters in imaginative and perspicuous ways. More problematic is the relative absence (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10.  26
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2003). International Justice as Equal Regard and the Use of Force. Ethics and International Affairs 17 (2):63–75.
    Have we any obligations beyond our own borders? What form do these take? These questions are addressed through a concept of comparative justice indebted to the just war tradition and the equal moral regard of persons.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11.  1
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2002). [Book Review] Who Are We?: Critical Reflections and Hopeful Possibilities. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (3):616-618.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12.  27
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2007). Terrorism, Regime Change, and Just War: Reflections on Michael Walzer. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (2):131-137.
  13.  6
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1995). Feminism, Family, and Community. In Penny A. Weiss & Marilyn Friedman (eds.), Feminism and Community. Temple University Press
  14.  11
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1997). Real Politics: At the Center of Everyday Life. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    One of America's foremost public intellectuals, Jean Bethke Elshtain has been on the frontlines in the most hotly contested and deeply divisive issues of our time. Now in Real Politics , Elshtain gives further proof of her willingness to speak her mind, courting disagreement and even censure from those who prefer their ideologies neat. At the center of Elshtain's work is a passionate concern with the relationship between political rhetoric and political action. For Elshtain, politics is a sphere of concrete (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  7
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2003). 3. Women and the Dilemma of Equality. Logos 6 (4).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  18
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2001). Bonhoeffer on Modernity: "Sic Et Non". Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):345 - 366.
    Though Bonhoeffer is usually thought to have been one of the architects of modern theology, he was also one of modernity's most penetrating critics. The author lays out Bonhoeffer's challenges to certain cherished modern assumptions by examining (1) his linkage of totalitarianism to the political utopianism that arose out of the French Revolution, (2) his fear of the nihilistic implications of the rationalists' notion of the sovereign self and of the modern tendency to view life as an end in itself, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Jean Bethke Elshtain (ed.) (1992). Just War Theory. New York University Press.
    Available Again! Long before the "shock and awe" campaign against Iraq in March 2003, debates swarmed around the justifications of the U.S.-led war to depose Saddam Hussein. While George W. Bush's administration declared a just war of necessity, opponents charged that it was a war of choice, and even opportunism. Behind the rhetoric lie vital questions: when is war just, and what means are acceptable even in the course of a just war? Originally published in 1991, in the wake of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  14
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2004). What's Morality Got to Do with It? Making the Right Distinctions. Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):1-13.
    I will be arguing against a school of thought and an epistemology. The school of thought is ‘scientific neorealism’, as it is called in the study of international relations. This perspective is shaped by the insistence that ethics and international politics have nothing to do with one another, save insofar as morality is brought in as window dressing in order to disguise what is really going on: the clash of narrowly self-interested powers. The world of international relations is construed as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1990). Power Trips and Other Journeys Essays in Feminism as Civic Discourse.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2001). Meditations on Modern Political Thought: Masculine/Feminine Themes From Luther to Arendt. Penn State University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk (1986). Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  25
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2011). Tayloring Reformed Epistemology: Charles Taylor, Alvin Plantinga and the De Jure Challenge to Christian Belief , by Deane-Peter Baker. Philosophical Papers 38 (1):129-131.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2011). Between Heaven and Hell. Process Studies 40 (2):215-226.
    The following essay examines the temptations of ultimacy in 20th-century politics, namely, the urge to infuse temporal arrangements with transcendentalmeaning and purpose. This sets up an idolatry of the state or of political processes and brings to a halt the complex dialectic between immanence and transcendence, between what Bonhoeffer calls the “penultimate” and the “ultimate.” This dialogic encounter between claims, loyalties, purposes, and meaningsdefines the West at her best. When the window to transcendence is slammed shut and politics is subsequently (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2001). Bonhoeffer on Modernity: Sic Et Non. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):345-366.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  16
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1993). Augustine and the Limits of Virtue. Augustinian Studies 24:187-194.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1981). Against Androgyny. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 47:5.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2008). Elegy and Eulogy. Common Knowledge 14 (2):291-295.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1995). The Communitarian Individual. In Amitai Etzioni (ed.), New Communitarian Thinking: Persons, Virtues, Institutions, and Communities. University Press of Virginia
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Jean Bethke Elshtain & James Tully (1994). The Risks and Responsibilities of Affirming Ordinary Life. In Charles Taylor, James Tully & Daniel M. Weinstock (eds.), Philosophy in an Age of Pluralism: The Philosophy of Charles Taylor in Question. Cambridge University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  2
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1992). Begging to Differ. Hastings Center Report 22 (1):47-48.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  2
    Jeffrey M. Perl, Stanley N. Katz, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Joris van Eijnatten, Yoke-Sum Wong, Miguel Tamen, Natalie Zemon Davis, John L. Flood, Randolph Starn & G. Thomas Tanselle (2002). Peace and Mind: Seriatim Symposium on Dispute, Conflict, and Enmity Part 2: Caveats and Consolations. Common Knowledge 8 (2):284-286.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  4
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1983). The Vexation of Weil. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1983 (58):195-203.
    Simone Weil is a vexation. An intellectual in the French Cartesian tradition who bore witness to her experience of Christ's presence (in November 1938); a radical who called “the destruction of the past… perhaps the greatest of all crimes”; a left-winger who penned trenchant critiques of Marxist thought and state socialist practice; a social theorist who condemned human collectives as a Great Beast yet yearned for a working class movement from “below;” Weil defies the usual categories. Embracing the role of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  4
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1993). Christianity and Patriarchy: The Odd Alliance. Modern Theology 9 (2):109-122.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  3
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2003). 7 Don't Be Cruel: Reflections on Rortyian Liberalism. In Charles B. Guignon & David R. Hiley (eds.), Richard Rorty. Cambridge University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  3
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2004). But Was It Just-Reflections on the Iraq War. Nexus 9:69.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  3
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1996). Review Essay. Modern Theology 12 (3):367-376.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  10
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2008). Comments on Kasher and Yadlin. Philosophia 36 (2):203-208.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  9
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2005). Against the New Utopianism. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (2):91–96.
    Why do utopian dreams of a peaceable kingdom run high despite all historic evidence to the contrary? Examining this question in light of the current struggle on how best to respond to terrorism and within the framework of a just war tradition indebted to Augustine, the paper examines, first, the new utopianism, before going on to assay the ongoing capacities of Augustinianism as an alternative way to frame issues of international justice in light of contemporary threats.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  1
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (1989). Book Review:Peace and War: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Mary Lecron Foster. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (2):448-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  2
    Jean Bethke Elshtain & Christopher Beem (2002). Communities and Community: Critique and Retrieval. In Philip Alperson (ed.), Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Blackwell Pub.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2008). Toleration, Proselytizing, and the Politics of Recognition. In Thomas Banchoff (ed.), Religious Pluralism, Globalization and World Politics. Oxford University Press
  42.  1
    Jean Bethke Elshtain (2009). St Augustine. In David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.), Contemporary Political Theory. OUP Oxford 268-274.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert (2003). History of American Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Richard J. Bernstein, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Amitai Etzioni, William Galston, Franklin I. Gamwell, Timothy Jackson, James Turner Johnson, John Kelsay & Jean Porter (2006). Universalism Vs. Relativism: Making Moral Judgments in a Changing, Pluralistic, and Threatening World. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Has moral relativism run its course? The threat of 9/11, terrorism, reproductive technology, and globalization has forced us to ask anew whether there are universal moral truths upon which to base ethical and political judgments. In this timely edited collection, distinguished scholars present and test the best answers to this question. These insightful responses temper the strong antithesis between universalism and relativism and retain sensitivity to how language and history shape the context of our moral decisions. This important and relevant (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Albert Borgmann, Richard Rorty, Steven Fesmire, Christina Hoff Sommers, Edward W. Said, Stanley Kurtz, Barbara Ehrenreich, Jerry L. Walls, Jerry Weinberger, Leon Kass, Jane Smiley, Janet C. Gornick, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas Pogge, Isabel V. Sawhill & Richard Pipes (2004). Moral Soundings: Readings on the Crisis of Values in Contemporary Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This topically organized, interdisciplinary anthology provides competing perspective on the claim that western culture faces a moral crisis. Using clearly written, accessible essays by well-known authors in philosophy, the social sciences, and the humanities, the book introduces students to a variety of perspectives on the current cultural debate about values that percolates beneath the surface of most of our social and political controversies.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Stanley Carlson-Thies, Jonathan Chaplin, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Kenneth L. Grasso, Russell Hittinger, Timothy Sherratt & James W. Skillen (2008). Christianity and Civil Society: Catholic and Neo-Calvinist Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    A work of contemporary Christian political thought, this volume addresses the crisis of modern democracy evident in the decline of the institutions of civil society and their theoretical justification. Drawing upon a rich store of social and political reflection found in the Catholic and Neo-Calvinist traditions, the essays mount a robust defense of the irreducible identity and value of the social institutions_family, neighborhood, church, civic association_that serve as the connective tissue of a political community.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. : Nicholas C. Lund-Molfese, Michael Kelly, Francis Cardinal George, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Patrick Lee, Peter Kreeft, Charles E. Rice & Gerard V. Bradley (2004). Bioethics: A Culture War. Upa.
    The purpose of this valuable book is to consider recent cultural trends in bioethics from a Catholic perspective. Bioethics is intended for a lay audience interested in understanding bioethical issues from a Catholic perspective.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1982). Birth Control and Controlling Birth. Women‐Centered Perspectives. By the Same Editors. Hastings Center Report 12 (1):40-43.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2000). [Book Review] New Wine and Old Bottles, International Politics and Ethical Discourse. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 14:180-182.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2001). Christian Imperatives and Civil Life. Modern Schoolman 78 (2/3):163-178.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 61