10 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Jean Bricmont
  1. Jean Bricmont, The Sleep of Reason.
    You will remember that in 1996 a physicist at New York University named Alan Sokal brought off a delicious hoax that displayed the fraudulence of certain leading figures in cultural studies. He submitted to the journal Social Text an article entitled "Transgressing the boundaries: Toward a transformative hermeneutics of quantum gravity", espousing the fashionable doctrine that scientific objectivity is a myth, and combining heavy technical references to contemporary physics and mathematics with patently ridiculous claims about their broader philosophical, cultural (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jean Bricmont & Alan Sokal, The Furor Over Impostures Intellectuelles.
    The publication in France of our book Impostures Intellectuelles [1] appears to have created a small storm in certain intellectual circles. According to Jon Henley in The Guardian, we have shown that ``modern French philosophy is a load of old tosh.''[2] According to Robert Maggiori in Libération, we are humourless scientistic pedants who correct grammatical errors in love letters.[3] We shall try to explain here why neither is the case.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alan Sokal & Jean Bricmont, Postmodernism, Poststructuralism, Etc.
    My favorite poststructuralist is Gilles Deleuze (with or without Guattari). I like to think that he was really writing an elaborate series of works of science fiction, in a non-fictional format (much as Stanislaw Lem did in Imaginary Magnitude and A Perfect Vacuum ), only without letting anyone in on the joke. Partly this is because there are moments where what he says is almost right (such as the definition of "relation" he gives in his interview with Claire Parnet, where (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alan Sokal & Jean Bricmont, Sokal and Bricmont: Is This the Beginning of the End of the Dark Ages in the Humanities?
    When I was a boy, I was friendly with a lad who lived a few doors away. We used to take bicycle rides together and have gunfights on the waste land and light fires and play scratch cricket. Our ways parted as our interests evolved in different directions. There were no hard feelings and, indeed, much residual good will. Roger (this is not his true name, which I shall withhold for the sake of his family) did not share any of (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jean Bricmont (2011). Looking for a Quantum Ontology. Metascience 20 (1):103-106.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jean Bricmont (2005). 14 The Responsibility of the Intellectual. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press. 280.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jean Bricmont & Alan D. Sokal (2000). Authors' Response [to David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek and Steve Fuller]. Metascience 9 (3):372-395.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek, Steve Fuller, Alan Sokal, Jean Bricmont, Alan Frost, Alan Chalmers, Anna Salleh, Alfred I. Tauber, Yvonne Luxford, Nicolaas Rupke, Steven French, Peter G. Brown, Hugh LaFollette, Peter Machamer, Nicolas Rasmussen, Andy J. Miller, Marya Schechtman, Ross S. West, John Forge, David Oldroyd, Nancy Demand, Darrin W. Belousek, Warren Schmaus, Sungook Hong, Rachel A. Ankeny, Peter Anstey, Jeremy Butterfield & Harshi Gunawardena (2000). Clarity, Charity and Criticism, Wit, Wisdom and Worldliness: Avoiding Intellectual Impositions. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (3):347-498.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jean Bricmont, Comment Peut-on Être « Positiviste » ?
    Je voudrais demander au lecteur d’envisager favorablement une doctrine qui peut, je le crains, paraître extrêmement paradoxale et subversive. La doctrine en question est la suivante : il n’est pas désirable de croire en une proposition lorsqu’il n’y a aucune raison..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jean Bricmont, Qu'est-Ce Que le Matérialisme Scientifique ?
    En général, les dogmes matérialistes n’ont pas été édifiés par des gens qui aimaient les dogmes, mais par des gens qui pensaient que rien de moins net ne leur permettrait de combattre les dogmes qu’ils n’aimaient pas. Ils étaient dans la situation de gens qui lèvent des armées pour défendre la paix (1).
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation