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Jean Keller [7]Jean Clare Keller [1]
  1. Jean Keller & Lisa Schwartzman, The Metaphysics of Gender and Sexual Difference.
    “It is certainly true, as nominalists have been concerned to acknowledge, that judgements about kinds are determined in part by human interests, projects, and practices. But the possibility that human interests, projects, and practices sometimes develop as they do because the real (physical or social) world is as it is suggests that this sort of dependence is not by itself an argument against essentialism.” -Susan Babbitt (1996, 146).
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  2. Jean Keller (2010). Rethinking Ruddick and the Ethnocentrism Critique of Maternal Thinking. Hypatia 25 (4):834-851.
    In the early 1990s, Sara Ruddick's Maternal Thinking was criticized for harboring a latent ethnocentrism. Ruddick responded to these critiques in the 1995 edition of her book, but her response has not yet been addressed in the feminist philosophical literature. This essay addresses this lacuna in the scholarship on Ruddick. In the last installment of this critique, Alison Bailey and Patrice DiQuinzio suggested that the only way for Ruddick to avoid the ethnocentrism charge would require her near-universalistic claims about mothering (...)
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  3. Jean Keller (2008). Dialogue Among Friends: Toward a Discourse Ethic of Interpersonal Relationships. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 158-181.
    Despite clear parallels between Jürgen Habermas’s discourse ethics and recent scholarship in feminist ethics, feminists are often suspicious of discourse ethics and have kept themselves mostly separate from the field. By developing a sustained application of Habermas’s discourse ethics to friendship, Keller demonstrates that feminist misgivings of discourse ethics are largely misplaced and that Habermas’s theory can be used to develop a compelling moral phenomenology of interpersonal relations.
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  4. Jean Keller (2008). Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men? Teaching Philosophy 31 (4):397-401.
  5. Linda Martín Alcoff, Bat-Ami Bar On, Laura Cannon, Ann Ferguson, Marilyn Frye, Alison M. Jaggar, Alison Kafer, Jean Keller, Sarah Clark Miller, Michele Moody-Adams, Lisa Tessman & Shelley Wilcox (2005). Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  6. Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.) (2005). Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
     
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  7. Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (2005). Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics : An Introduction. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 1.
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  8. Jean Keller (1997). Autonomy, Relationality, and Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 12 (2):152-164.
    While care ethics has frequently been criticized for lacking an account of autonomy, this paper argues that care ethics' relational model of moral agency provides the basis for criticizing the philosophical tradition's model of autonomy and for rethinking autonomy in relational terms. Using Diana Meyers's account of autonomy competency as a basis, a dialogical model of autonomy is developed that can respond to internal and external critiques of care ethics.
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