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  1.  28
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). Corpus. Fordham University Press.
    The last and most poignant of these essays is The Intruder, Nancys philosophical meditation on his heart transplant.
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  2.  28
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2000). Being Singular Plural. Stanford University Press.
    One of the strongest strands in Nancy's philosophy is an attempt to rethink community and the very idea of the social in a way that does not ground these ideas in some individual subject or subjectivity. The fundamental argument of this book is that being is always 'being with', that 'I' is not prior to 'we', that existence is essentially co-existence. He thinks this being together, not as a comfortable enclosure in a pre-existing group, but as a mutual abandonment and (...)
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  3. Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). The Sense of the World. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    An essential exploration of sense and meaning. -/- Is there a “world” anymore, let alone any “sense” to it? Acknowledging the lack of meaning in our time, and the lack of a world at the center of meanings we try to impose, Jean-Luc Nancy presents a rigorous critique of the many discourses-from philosophy and political science to psychoanalysis and art history-that talk and write their way around these gaping absences in our lives. -/- In an original style befitting his search (...)
     
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  4. Jean-Luc Nancy (2007). The Creation of the World or Globalization. State University of New York Press.
    Appearing in English for the first time, Jean-Luc Nancy’s 2002 book reflects on globalization and its impact on our being-in-the-world. Developing a contrast in the French language between two terms that are usually synonymous, or that are used interchangeably, namely globalisation (globalization) and mondialisation (world-forming), Nancy undertakes a rethinking of what “world-forming” might mean. At stake in this distinction is for him nothing less than two possible destinies of our humanity, and of our time. On the one hand, (...)
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  5.  7
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1991). The Inoperative Community. University of Minnesota Press.
    A collection of five essays of French philosopher Nancy, originally published in 1985-86: The Inoperative Community, Myth Interpreted, Literary Communism, Shattered Love, and Of Divine Places.
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  6. Jean-Luc Nancy (2013). Adoration. Fordham University Press.
    Adoration is the second volume of the Deconstruction of Christianity, following Dis-Enclosure. The first volume attempted to demonstrate why it is necessary to open reason up not to a religious dimension but to one transcending reason as we have been accustomed to understanding it; the term "adoration" attempts to name the gesture of this dis-enclosed reason. -/- Adoration causes us to receive ignorance as truth: not a feigned ignorance, perhaps not even a "nonknowledge," nothing that would attempt to justify the (...)
     
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  7.  3
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). Dis-Enclosure: The Deconstruction of Christianity. Fordham Univesity Press.
    This book is a profound and eagerly anticipated investigation into what is left of a monotheistic religious spirit—notably, a minimalist faith that is neither confessional nor credulous. Articulating this faith as works and as an objectless hope, Nancy deconstructs Christianity in search of the historical and reflective conditions that provided its initial energy. Working through Blanchot and Nietzsche, re-reading Heidegger and Derrida, Nancy turns to the Epistle of Saint James rather than those of Saint Paul, discerning in it the primitive (...)
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  8.  9
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2003). A Finite Thinking. Stanford University Press.
    This book is a rich collection of philosophical essays radically interrogating key notions and preoccupations of the phenomenological tradition. While using Heidegger’s Being and Time as its permanent point of reference and dispute, this collection also confronts other important philosophers, such as Kant, Nietzsche, and Derrida. The projects of these pivotal thinkers of finitude are relentlessly pushed to their extreme, with respect both to their unexpected horizons and to their as yet unexplored analytical potential. A Finite Thinking shows that, paradoxically, (...)
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  9.  22
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2005). The Ground of the Image. Fordham University Press.
    If anything marks the image, it is a deep ambivalence. Denounced as superficial, illusory, and groundless, images are at the same time attributed with exorbitant power and assigned a privileged relation to truth. Mistrusted by philosophy, forbidden and embraced by religions, manipulated as “spectacle” and proliferated in the media, images never cease to present their multiple aspects, their paradoxes, their flat but receding spaces.What is this power that lies in the depths and recesses of an image—which is always only an (...)
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  10.  26
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1993). The Experience of Freedom. Stanford University Press.
    This is the most systematic, the most radical, and the most lucid treatise on freedom that has been written in contemporary Continental philosophy. Finding its guiding motives in Kant's second Critique and working its way up to and beyond Heidegger and Adorno, this book marks the most advanced position in the thinking of freedom that has been proposed after Sartre and Levinas. If we do not think being itself as a freedom, we are condemned to think of freedom as a (...)
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  11. Jean-Luc Nancy (2002). Hegel: The Restlessness of the Negative. University of Minnesota Press.
    At once an introduction to Hegel and a radically new vision of his thought, this work penetrates the entirety of the Hegelian field with brevity and precision, while compromising neither rigour nor depth.
     
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  12. Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). The Being-with of Being-There. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):1-15.
    In Being and Time, Heidegger affirms that being-with or Mitsein is an essential constitution of Dasein but he does not submit this existential to the same rigorous analyses as other existentials. In this essay, Jean-Luc Nancy points to the different places where Heidegger erased the possibility of thinking an essential with that he himself opened. This erasure is due, according to Nancy, to the subordination of Mitsein to a thinking of the proper and the improper. The polarization of Being-with between (...)
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  13.  1
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). Noli Me Tangere: On the Raising of the Body. Fordham University Press.
    Christian parables have retained their force well beyond the sphere of religion; indeed, they share with much of modern literature their status as a form of address: "Who hath ears to hear, let him hear." There is no message without there first being--or, more subtly, without there also being in the message itself--an address to a capacity or an aptitude for listening. This is not an exhortation of the kind "Pay attention!" Rather, it is a warning: if you do not (...)
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  14.  16
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1993). The Birth to Presence. Stanford University Press.
    The central problem posed in these essays, collected from over a decade, is how in the wake of Western ontologies to conceive the coming, the birth that characterises being. The first part of this book, 'Existence' asks how, today, one can give sense or meaning to existence as such, arguing that existence itself, as it comes nude into the world, must now be our 'sense'. In examining what this birth to presence might be, we should not ask what presence 'is'; (...)
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  15. Eduardo Cadava, Peter Connor & Jean-Luc Nancy (eds.) (1991). Who Comes After the Subject? Routledge.
  16. Jean-Luc Nancy & Tracy B. Strong (1992). La Comparution /the Compearance: From the Existence of "Communism" to the Community of "Existence". Political Theory 20 (3):371-398.
  17.  22
    Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe & Jean-Luc Nancy (1997). Retreating the Political. Routledge.
    Retreating the Political presents many of the key issues at the heart of Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe and Jean-Luc Nancy's work. Published here for the first time in English, we see some of the key motifs that have characterized their work: their debt to a Heideggerian pre-understanding of philosophy; the centrality of the "figure" in western philosophy and the totalitarianism of both politics and the political. Through contemporary readings of the political in Freud, Heidegger and Marx they reveal how philosophy relies on (...)
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  18. Jean-Luc Nancy (2003). Noli me tangere: Essai sur la levée du corps. Bayard.
    Noli me tangere - Ne me touche pas : c'est une scène singulière de l'évangile de Jean, et c'est une parole emblématique pour des situations de violence ou de désir. C'est aussi, et d'abord, le rappel lapidaire d'un tabou majeur de toutes les cultures : celui du toucher. Or Marie-Madeleine, à qui cette parole est adressée par Jésus, a connu dans l'hagiographie un destin bien particulier : amante tantôt physique et tantôt mystique du Christ, double féminin et sensuel de l'incarnation (...)
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  19.  12
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). Multiple Arts: The Muses II. Stanford University Press.
    This collection of writings by Jean-Luc Nancy, the renowned French critic and poet, delves into the history of philosophy to locate a fundamentally poetic modus operandi there. The book represents a daring mixture of Nancy’s philosophical essays, writings about artworks, and artwork of his own. With theoretical rigor, Nancy elaborates on the intrinsic multiplicity of art as a concept of “making,” and outlines the tensions inherent in the faire, the “making” that characterizes the very process of production and thereby the (...)
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  20. Jean-Luc Nancy (1996). The Muses. Stanford University Press.
    This collection, by one of the most challenging of contemporary thinkers, asks the question: why are there several arts and not just one? This question focuses on the point of maximal tension between the philosophical tradition and contemporary thinking about the arts: the relation between the plurality of the human senses and sense or meaning in general. Throughout the five essays, Nancy's argument hinges on the culminating formulation of this relation in Hegel's Aesthetics and The Phenomenology of Spirit - art (...)
     
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  21.  12
    Jean-Luc Nancy & Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe (1988). The Literary Absolute: The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism. SUNY.
    The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, Jean-Luc Nancy. Preface: The. Literary. Absolute. I. "There are classifications that are bad enough as classifications, but that have nonetheless dominated entire ...
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  22.  10
    Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross & Slavoj Zizek (2011). Democracy in What State? Columbia University Press.
    "Is it meaningful to call oneself a democrat? And if so, how do you interpret the word?" -/- In responding to this question, eight iconoclastic thinkers prove the rich potential of democracy, along with its critical weaknesses, and reconceive the practice to accommodate new political and cultural realities. Giorgio Agamben traces the tense history of constitutions and their coexistence with various governments. Alain Badiou contrasts current democratic practice with democratic communism. Daniel Bensaid ponders the institutionalization of democracy, while Wendy Brown (...)
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  23. Jean-Luc Nancy (2001). La pensée dérobée. Galilée.
    « “Je pense comme une fille enlève sa robe.” (Bataille.) La pensée est une mise à nu et la nudité est inachevable : elle n’est pas un état, elle est un mouvement incessant pour se porter à l’extrémité à laquelle n’atteint que ce qui se dérobe encore en atteignant l’extrémité. Mais le dénudement touche aussi au dénuement : aujourd’hui, la pensée doit répondre d’une détresse du monde et d’un souci de l’histoire qui défient toutes nos philosophies, nos religions, nos représentations. (...)
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  24. Jean-Luc Nancy (1996). Être singulier pluriel. Galilée.
    "Les uns avec les autres" : ni les “uns”, ni les “autres” ne sont premiers, mais seulement l’“avec” par lequel il y a des “uns” et des “autres”. L’“avec” est une détermination fondamentale de l’“être”. L’existence est essentiellement co-existence. Non seulement co-existence de “nous” (les hommes), mais de tous les étants (il faut de tout faire un “monde”). Être-avec, ou s’exposer les uns aux autres, les uns par les autres : rien à voir avec une “société du spectacle”, mais rien (...)
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  25.  69
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1999). Heidegger's “Originary Ethics”. Studies in Practical Philosophy 1 (1):12-35.
  26. Jean-Luc Nancy (1993). Le Sens du Monde. Galilée.
    « On ne cesse de répéter que notre époque manque de sens, et qu’elle est en quête de sens. Ce livre essaie de dire que ce diagnostic n’est peut-être pas le bon. Nous avons perdu, en effet, le “sens” que les religions et les philosophies proposaient comme une “vision du monde”, avec ses valeurs et ses buts. Cette époque est révolue. Cela veut dire qu’il nous reste à découvrir comment le monde lui-même, en tant que l’espace de nos existences, et (...)
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  27.  2
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2010). The Truth of Democracy. Fordham.
    Written in a direct and accessible, almost manifesto-like style, The Truth of Democracy presents a forceful plea that we rethink democracy not as one political regime or form among others but as that which opens up the very experience of ...
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  28. Jean-Luc Nancy (1997). The Gravity of Thought. Humanities Press.
    A meditation on the changing role of philosophy in a postmodernist context, the two essays gathered here—The Forgetting of Philosophy and The Weight of a Thought—represent some of the themes that have recently occupied Nancy's thought.
     
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  29. Jean-Luc Nancy (1990). Sharing Voices. In Gayle Ormiston & Alan Schrift (eds.), Transforming the Hermeneutic Context: From Nietzsche to Nancy. SUNY
     
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  30.  11
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2014). What Is to Be Done? Diacritics 42 (2):100-117.
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  31. Jean-Luc Nancy (2007). Listening. Fordham University Press.
    In this lyrical meditation on listening, Jean-Luc Nancy examines sound in relation to the human body. How is listening different from hearing? What does listening entail? How does what is heard differ from what is seen? Can philosophy even address listening, écouter, as opposed to entendre, which means both hearing and understanding? -/- Unlike the visual arts, sound produces effects that persist long after it has stopped. The body, Nancy says, is itself like an echo chamber, responding to music by (...)
     
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  32.  14
    Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe & Jean-Luc Nancy (1990). The Nazi Myth. Critical Inquiry 16 (2): 291–312..
    What interests us and claims our attention in Nazism is, essentially, its ideology, in the definition Hannah Arendt has given of this term in her book on The Origins of Totalitarianism. In this work, ideology is defined as the totally self-fulfilling logic of an idea, an idea “by which the movement of history is explained as one consistent process.” “The movement of history and the logical process of this notion,” Arendt continues, “are supposed to correspond to each other, so that (...)
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  33. Jean-Luc Nancy (1988). L'expérience de la liberté. Galilée.
    « La liberté : ce singulier ne désigne pas ici une essence à laquelle rapporter toutes nos “libertés”. Il suspend au contraire toute détermination de ces “libertés”, qu’on sait bien “formelles”, sans pourtant vouloir le savoir… Il le fait au nom de l’expérience singulière de ce qui est sans essence : l’existence même. Cette expérience est un fait, lui aussi singulier, car il n’obéit pas à une logique du “fait” opposé à la “loi”. Ni fait, ni loi, mais l’être même (...)
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  34. Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). Rancière and Metaphysics. In Gabriel Rockhill & Philip Watts (eds.), Jacques Rancière: History, Politics, Aesthetics. Duke University Press
  35. Jean-Luc Nancy (1994). Les Muses. Galilée.
    « Pourquoi y a-t-il plusieurs arts, et non pas un seul ? Cette question paraît trop simple : on pensera même qu’elle ne fait pas question. Et cependant, pour peu qu’on se dérobe à une idée romantique de l’Art majuscule, elle est de nature à déplacer toute notre manière de considérer ce qu’on appelle les arts, et avec eux d’une part les sens (et le sens de “sens”), d’autre part la technique (dont l’“art” n’est jamais que la traduction). Avec les (...)
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  36.  41
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1999). Thinking Better of Capital: An Interview. Studies in Practical Philosophy 1 (2):214-232.
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  37. Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). The Confronted Community. In Andrew J. Mitchell & Jason Kemp Winfree (eds.), The Obsessions of Georges Bataille: Community and Communication. State University of New York Press
     
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  38.  18
    Jean-Luc Nancy & Roxanne Lapidus (2011). Rühren, Berühren, Aufruhr. Substance 40 (3):10-17.
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  39.  4
    Paul Audi, Jean-François Mattéi, Jean-Luc Nancy, Isabelle Barbéris, Alain Renaut & Christian Godin (2014). À Propos de : Marion, Mattéi, Nancy, Rancière, Renaut, Serres, Zarka. Cités 58 (2):223.
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  40. Jean-Luc Nancy (1990). Une pensée finie. Galilée.
    « L’existence a-t-elle un sens quelconque ? – cette question aura besoin de quelques siècles pour seulement être entendue de façon complète et dans toute sa profondeur. » Nietzsche -/- « Parce que la philosophie s’adresse à l’homme dans sa totalité et dans ce qu’il a de plus élevé, il faut que la finitude s’indique dans la philosophie d’une manière tout à fait radicale. » Heidegger.
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  41.  6
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2002). Chronique. Rue Descartes 4 (4):120-122.
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  42. Jean-Luc Nancy (2002). The Speculative Remark: (One of Hegel’s Bons Mots). Stanford University Press.
     
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  43.  58
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). On the Meanings of Democracy. Theoria 53 (111):1-5.
    'On the Meanings of Democracy' points to the fragility and contested meanings of 'democracy'. Once 'the assurance is given that "democracy" is the only kind of political regime that is acceptable to an adult, emancipated population which is an end in itself, the very idea of democracy fades and becomes blurred and confusing'. Such 'wide-spread lack of clarity' gave rise to Europe's 'totalitarian' regimes. It is claimed that 'it is impossible to be simply a "democrat" without questioning what this really (...)
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  44. Jean-luc Nancy (2001). L'"Il y a" du Rapport Sexuel. Galilée.
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  45. Jean-Luc Nancy (2007). On the Multiple Senses of Democracy. In Martin McQuillan (ed.), The Politics of Deconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Other of Philosophy. Pluto Press 43--53.
     
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  46.  1
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2016). Les Iris. le Portique 36.
    Ce texte de Jean-Luc Nancy est une « divagation » pensante sur ce qu’évoquent les iris, ces fleurs dont le nom fait penser à celui d’un auteur qui a sans cesse joué avec ce type de consonances et de résonnances, entre les mots, les choses et les idées. Iris est une déesse qui importe à la philosophie : elle est la messagère des dieux, et comme un arc-en-ciel qui ne cesse de susciter l’étonnement. Nous sommes invités à emprunter quelques-unes de (...)
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  47. Jean-Luc Nancy (2000). Le regard du portrait. Galilée.
    « Quel est le sujet du portrait ? Nul autre que le sujet lui-même, absolument. Où le sujet lui-même a-t-il sa vérité et son effectivité ? Nulle part ailleurs que dans le portrait. Il n’y a donc de sujet qu’en peinture, tout comme il n’y a de peinture que du sujet. Dans la peinture, le sujet s’en va par le fond (il “revient à soi”) ; dans le sujet, la peinture fait surface (elle excède la face). Surgit alors d’un trait, (...)
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  48.  35
    Jean-Luc Nancy (1988). Introduction. Topoi 7 (2):87-92.
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  49.  16
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2008). La scène mondiale du rock. Rue Descartes 60 (2):74-84.
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  50. Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe & Jean-Luc Nancy (eds.) (1981). Les fins de l'homme: À partir du travail de Jacques Derrida (Colloque de Cerisy, 23 juillet-2 août 1980). Galilée.
    Actes du colloque organisé dans la troisième décade de juillet 1980, au Centre culturel international de Cerisy-la-Salle. L’enjeu étant que « le travail de Jacques Derrida n’en soit pas l’objet mais le prétexte ou l’occasion ». Dirigé par Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe et Jean-Luc Nancy, le fil conducteur en est « l’implication que peut avoir une question des « “fins de l’homme” » dans le travail de Derrida ou pour son travail. Son ambition aura été de traverser et de déplacer en (...)
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