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Jean-Luc Schwartz [7]Jean-Luc L. Schwartz [1]
  1. Raphaël Laurent, Clément Moulin-Frier, Pierre Bessière, Jean-Luc Schwartz & Julien Diard (2013). Integrate, Yes, but What and How? A Computational Approach of Sensorimotor Fusion in Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):364 - 365.
    We consider a computational model comparing the possible roles of and in phonetic decoding, demonstrating that these two routes can contain similar information in some communication situations and highlighting situations where their decoding performance differs. We conclude that optimal decoding should involve some sort of fusion of association and simulation in the human brain.
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  2. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the processing (...)
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  3. Jean-Luc Schwartz (2007). Phonology Grounded in Sensorimotor Speech: Elements of a Morphogenesis Theory. Interaction Studies 5:313-324.
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  4. Jihène Serkhane, Jean-Luc Schwartz & Pierre Bessiere (2005). Building a Talking Baby Robot: A Contribution to the Study of Speech Acquisition and Evolution. Interaction Studies 6 (2):253-286.
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  5. Christian Abry, Anne Vilain & Jean-Luc Schwartz (2004). Introduction: Vocalize to Localize? A Call for Better Crosstalk Between Auditory and Visual Communication Systems Researchers: From Meerkats to Humans. Interaction Studies 5 (3):313-325.
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  6. Jean-Luc Schwartz, Frédéric Berthommier & Christophe Savariaux (2004). Seeing to Hear Better: Evidence for Early Audio-Visual Interactions in Speech Identification. Cognition 93 (2):69-78.
    Lip reading is the ability to partially understand speech by looking at the speaker's lips. It improves the intelligibility of speech in noise when audio-visual perception is compared with audio-only perception. A recent set of experiments showed that seeing the speaker's lips also enhances sensitivity to acoustic information, decreasing the auditory detection threshold of speech embedded in noise [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001) 2272; J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108 (2000) 1197]. However, detection is different from comprehension, and it remains (...)
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  7. Christian Abry, Marc Sato, Jean-Luc Schwartz, Hélène Loevenbruck & Marie-Agnès Cathiard (2003). Attention-Based Maintenance of Speech Forms in Memory: The Case of Verbal Transformations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):728-729.
    One of the fundamental questions raised by Ruchkin, Grafman, Cameron, and Berndt's (Ruchkin et al.'s) interpretation of no distinct specialized neural networks for short-term storage buffers and long-term memory systems, is that of the link between perception and memory processes. In this framework, we take the opportunity in this commentary to discuss a specific working memory task involving percept formation, temporary retention, auditory imagery, and the attention-based maintenance of information, that is, the verbal transformation effect.
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  8. Christian Abry, Louis-Jean Boë, Rafael Laboissière & Jean-Luc Schwartz (1998). A New Puzzle for the Evolution of Speech? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):512-513.
    We agree with MacNeilage's claim that speech stems from a volitional vocalization pathway between the cingulate and the supplementary motor area (SMA). We add the vocal self- monitoring system as the first recruitment of the Broca-Wernicke circuit. SMA control for “frames” is supported by wrong consonant-vowel recurring utterance aphasia and an imaging study of quasi-reiterant speech. The role of Broca's area is questioned in the emergence of “content,” because a primary motor mapping, embodying peripheral constraints, seems sufficient. Finally, we reject (...)
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