Search results for 'Jeanette M. A. Beer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeanette M. A. Beer (1981). Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages. Librairie Droz.score: 622.5
    ETUDES DE PHILOLOGIE 38 ETD'HISTOIRE JEANETTE MA BEER Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages GENEVE ...
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  2. Jeanette Beer (2003). Frédéric Duval, La Traduction du “Romuleon” Par Sébastien Mamerot: Etude Sur la Diffusion de I'histoire Romaine En Langue Vernaculaire à la Fin du Moyen Âge. (Publications Romanes Et Françaises, 228.) Geneva: Droz, 2001. Paper. Pp. 480 Plus 4 Black-Andwhite Figures; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):876-877.score: 210.0
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  3. Barbara K. Altmann (2009). Jeanette Beer, Beasts of Love: Richard de Fournival's “Bestiaire d'Amour” and a Woman's “Response.” Toronto; Buffalo, N.Y.; and London: University of Toronto Press, 2003. Pp. X, 214 Plus Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (1):117-118.score: 81.0
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  4. C. Delisle Burns (1941). Book Review:A History of British Socialism. M. Beer, R. H. Tawney. [REVIEW] Ethics 51 (2):234-.score: 81.0
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  5. Ben R. McRee (1999). Judith M. Bennett, Ale, Beer, and Brewsters in England: Women's Work in a Changing World, 1300–1600. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. Xv, 260; Tables and Black-and-White Figures. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (1):120-122.score: 81.0
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  6. Alex Byrne (2011). Review Essay of Dorit Bar-On's "Speaking My Mind". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (3):705 - 717.score: 27.0
    “Avowals” are utterances that “ascribe [current] states of mind”; for instance utterances of ‘I have a terrible headache’ and ‘I’m finding this painting utterly puzzling’ (Bar-On 2004: 1). And avowals, “when compared to ordinary empirical reports…appear to enjoy distinctive security” (1), which Bar-On elaborates as follows: A subject who avows being tired, or scared of something, or thinking that p, is normally presumed to have the last word on the relevant matters; we would not presume to criticize her self-ascription or (...)
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  7. Robert M. Martin (2002). There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book, Revised and Expanded: A Sourcebook of Philosophical Puzzles, Paradoxes and Problems. Broadview Press.score: 24.0
    Martin provides fascinating discussions of each problem or puzzle, and appends suggestions for further reading. Where the puzzle or problem admits of a right answer, Martin provides it in a separate section. But he also often ends with a question; as this book richly and entertainingly demonstrates, philosophy is as much the search for the right questions as it is for the right answers. There are many new entries in this edition, including "God as the Tortoise on the Bottom," "Free (...)
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  8. M. Macnamara & Z. Postma de Beer (1988). Hobbes and Existential Meaning. A Discussion Between, INQ, an Inquirer, and X, a Political Philosopher. South African Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):9-17.score: 21.0
     
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  9. Justin L. Barrett & Ian M. Church (2013). Should CSR Give Atheists Epistemic Assurance? On Beer-Goggles, BFFs, and Skepticism Regarding Religious Beliefs. The Monist 96 (3):311-324.score: 15.0
    Recent work in cognitive science of religion (CSR) is beginning to converge on a very interesting thesis—that, given the ordinary features of human minds operating in typical human environments, we are naturally disposed to believe in the existence of gods, among other religious ideas (e.g., seeAtran [2002], Barrett [2004; 2012], Bering [2011], Boyer [2001], Guthrie [1993], McCauley [2011], Pyysiäinen [2004; 2009]). In this paper, we explore whether such a discovery ultimately helps or hurts the atheist position—whether, for example, it lends (...)
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  10. Richard M. Gale (2010). God and Metaphysics. Prometheus Books.score: 15.0
    God -- On the cognitivity of mystical experiences -- The problem of evil -- God eternal and Paul helm -- A new cosmological argument, co-authored with Alexander Pruss -- A response to oppy and to Davey and Clifton -- Co-authored with Alexander Pruss -- The ecumenicalism of William James -- Time -- Is it now now? -- McTaggart's analysis of time -- The egocentric particular and token-reflexive analyses of tense -- The impossibility of backward causation -- An identity theory of (...)
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  11. Anthony J. Daboub & Jerry M. Calton (2002). Stakeholder Learning Dialogues: How to Preserve Ethical Responsibility in Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):85 - 98.score: 15.0
    The shift in corporate strategy, from vertical integration to strategic alliances, has developed hand in hand with the evolution of organizational structure, from the vertically integrated firm to the network organization. The result has been the elimination of boundaries, more flexible organizations, and a greater interaction among individuals and organizations. On the negative side, the specialization of firms on single areas of competence has resulted in the disaggregation of the value chain and in the disaggregation of ethical and legal responsibility. (...)
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  12. Arthur M. Silverstein (2000). Pasteur, Pastorians, and the Dawn of Immunology: The Importance of Specificity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (1):29 - 41.score: 10.0
    Throughout his career, the problems that attracted Louis Pasteur almost invariably involved considerations of specificity of structure and/or of action. Thus, his work on asymmetric crystals showed that chemical form not only specifies crystalline structure, but affects the affinity of ferments as well. In his studies of diseases of silkworms, of beer, and of wine, he could unerringly distinguish with the microscope the specific agents of disease. From this emerged his concept of the specificity of species and against the (...)
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