1. Jeanne L. Schroeder & David Gray Carlson (2009). Psychoanalysis as the Jurisprudence of Freedom. In Francis J. Mootz & William S. Boyd (eds.), On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the future of legal philosophy? No doubt it has many. But we are betting that jurisprudence will gravitate towards freedom. Freedom, the attribute of the human subject, has largely been absent from legal philosophy. This is a lack that psychoanalytic jurisprudence aims to correct. In this essay, drafted as chapter in "On Philosophy in American Law" (Francis Jay Mootz III, ed.) to be published by the Cambridge University Press, we set forth what we think are the primary differences (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jeanne Lorraine Schroeder (2008). The Four Lacanian Discourses: Or Turning Law Inside-Out. Routledge-Cavendish.
    This book proposes a taxonomy of jurisprudence and legal practice, based on the discourse theory of Jacques Lacan. in the anglophone academy, the positivist...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jeanne L. Schroeder (2000). The Hysterical Attorney: The Legal Advocate Within Lacanian Discourse Theory. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 13 (2):181-213.
    In this essay, I apply Jacques Lacan'sfour discourses to the legal profession. A lawyer –i.e. a legal expert – engages in the Master'sdiscourse when he writes the law; he engages in theUniversity discourse when he interprets or attempts tojustify the law. In contrast, an attorney – i.e. a legal advisor – engages in the Analyst'sdiscourse when she counsel's her client; she engagesin the Hysteric's discourse when she represents herclient. From a Lacanian perspective, the two lawyer'sdiscourses are masculine, while the two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation