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  1. Jeanne M. Logsdon & I. I. I. Buren (unknown). National Styles of Corporate Social Responsibility: Exploring Macro Influences on Responsible Business Behavior. Philosophical Explorations:253-268.
    While the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR) suggests that its form and content differ at least somewhat from country to country, it has not begun to address whether CSR practices converge or diverge over time as countries benefit from higher levels of economic development, or whether these practices relate to specific cultural values and institutional structures. This paper proposes an initial conceptual model and propositions to begin to assess whether and how the different levels of economic development, cultural values, (...)
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  2. Kathleen Rehbein, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Buren (2013). Corporate Responses to Shareholder Activists: Considering the Dialogue Alternative. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):137-154.
    This empirical study examines corporate responses to activist shareholder groups filing social-policy shareholder resolutions. Using resource dependency theory as our conceptual framing, we identify some of the drivers of corporate responses to shareholder activists. This study departs from previous studies by including a fourth possible corporate response, engaging in dialogue. Dialogue, an alternative to shareholder resolutions filed by activists, is a process in which corporations and activist shareholder groups mutually agree to engage in ongoing negotiations to deal with social issues. (...)
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  3. Mercy Berman & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2012). Business Participation in Regulatory Reform. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:179-189.
    President Barack Obama ordered federal regulatory agencies to engage in a retrospective regulatory review process in early 2011. This paper reports the initial results of an analysis of participation in the notice and comment process by business and public interest groups. The focus of the analysis is on comments given to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some attention is given to the EPA’s identification of regulations to be reviewed, as a result of this process.
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  4. Mercy Berman & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2011). Business Obligations for Human Rights. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:189-201.
    While it is generally assumed that large corporations today give rhetorical support for basic human rights in public relations documents, skepticism continues toarise about the behavior of these firms. Do company actions support their rhetoric? This paper provides the initial analysis of our study of both rhetoric and practice regarding human rights in a small sample of large U.S. firms. At this point in the analysis, UNGC membership does not appear to have much influence on corporate rhetoric, but may be (...)
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  5. Jacqueline N. Hood & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2011). Challenges That Employees with Personality Disorders Pose for Ethics and Compliance in Organizations. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:32-43.
    Personality-disordered individuals of certain types tend to exhibit behaviors that cause particular problems for the Ethics and Compliance (E&C) function inorganizations. This paper defines personality-disordered individuals and focuses on three types that might create such problems: the psychopath, the narcissist, and the obsessivecompulsive personality. We provide a working hypothesis about the problems that they may cause in organizations and then report the results of an exploratory study of E&C personnel. The paper concludes with recommendations for managers and for future research.
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  6. Jeanne M. Logsdon & John F. Mahon (2011). The BP Oil Disaster. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:379-390.
    This paper develops a two-part model of the crucial roles that episodic memory and perceptual filters play in responses to organizational crisis. We examine thecascading impacts of episodic memory, the types of filters that shape stakeholder responses to crisis, and subsequent impacts on reputation. A sound wave analogy is developed to understand the complexity of organizational crisis. The model is partially applied to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster.
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  7. Jeanne M. Logsdon & I. I. I. Buren (2009). Beyond the Proxy Vote: Dialogues Between Shareholder Activists and Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):353-365.
    The popular view of shareholder activism focuses on shareholder resolutions and the shareholder vote via proxy statements at the annual meeting, which is treated as a “David vs. Goliath” showdown between the small group of socially responsible investors and the powerful corporation. This article goes beyond the popular view to examine where the real action typically occurs – in the Dialogue process where corporations and shareholder activist groups mutually agree to ongoing communications to deal with a serious social issue. Use (...)
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  8. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Karen D. W. Patterson (2009). Deception in Business Networks: Is It Easier to Lie Online? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):537 - 549.
    This article synthesizes research presented in several models of unethical behavior to develop propositions about the factors that facilitate and mitigate deception in online business communications. The work expands the social network perspective to incorporate the medium of communication as a significant influence on deception. We go beyond existing models by developing seven propositions that identify how social network and issue moral intensity characteristics influence the probability of deception in online business communication in comparison to traditional communication channels. Remedies to (...)
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  9. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Van Buren (2009). Beyond the Proxy Vote: Dialogues Between Shareholder Activists and Corporations. Journal of Business Ethics 87:353 - 365.
    The popular view of shareholder activism focuses on shareholder resolutions and the shareholder vote via proxy statements at the annual meeting, which is treated as a "David vs. Goliath" showdown between the small group of socially responsible investors and the powerful corporation. This article goes beyond the popular view to examine where the real action typically occurs-in the Dialogue process where corporations and shareholder activist groups mutually agree to ongoing communications to deal with a serious social issue. Use of the (...)
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  10. Jacqueline N. Hood & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2008). The Influence of Organizational Culture Type on Forms of Bullying Behavior. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:65-73.
    Bullying in organizations is receiving more attention by managers, public policy makers, and scholars. This paper adds to the literature by examining how the culture of an organization may influence the frequency and types of bullying behavior that are predicted to occur. We develop propositions and examine measurement instruments in preparation for an empirical study.
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  11. Jeanne M. Logsdon (2008). Business Citizenship as Metaphor and Reality. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):51-59.
    We argue that Néron and Norman’s article stops short of the point where it would truly advance our understanding of corporate citizenship. Their article, in our view, fosters normative confusion and displays significant gaps in logic. In addition, the large and useful literature on business-government relations has for the most part been overlooked by Néron and Norman, even though their article ends with an enthusiastic call for scholarly attention to this subject.
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  12. Jeanne M. Logsdon, Harry van Buren Iii & Kathleen Rehbein (2008). Social Responsibility Ratings and Corporate Responses to Activist Shareholder Resolutions. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:307-317.
    The conventional view of the relationship between ratings of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and responses to activist shareholder resolutions is that firms with low CSR ratings are likely to resist activist’s pressures to change corporate policies and behavior. By contrast, firms with high CSR ratings are more likely to support such activist shareholder efforts. In the IABS discussionsession and this paper, we argue that the conventional view of corporate responses to shareholder resolutions is inadequate to explain the motivations, strategies, and (...)
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  13. Donna J. Wood & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2008). Business Citizenship as Metaphor and Reality. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):51-59.
    We argue that Néron and Norman’s article stops short of the point where it would truly advance our understanding of corporate citizenship. Their article, in our view, fosters normative confusion and displays significant gaps in logic. In addition, the large and useful literature on business-government relations has for the most part been overlooked by Néron and Norman, even though their article ends with an enthusiastic call for scholarly attention to this subject.
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  14. Jeanne M. Logsdon (2007). About These Proceedings. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:7-7.
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  15. Jeanne M. Logsdon, Jacqueline N. Hood & Michelle Detry (2007). Bullying in the Workplace. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:67-71.
    Workplace bullying is defined as repeated, malicious, and health-endangering mistreatment of an employee by one or more other employees. Workplace bullying has been associated with negative outcomes for the individual being bullied and for the organization in which such actions take place. This paper explains the nature, frequency, and costs of workplace bullying in the context of organizational culture, ethical culture, and organizational moral development. We also propose ways that organizations can and should deal with this increasingly common behavior.
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  16. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. van Buren Iii (2007). GLOBE Data in Business and Society Research? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:530-533.
    This workshop was organized to explain the GLOBE database to IABS members and elicit interest in embarking upon a major study of national similarities anddifferences in corporate responsibility practices.
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  17. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. van Buren Iii (2007). National Styles of Corporate Social Responsibility. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:253-268.
    While the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR) suggests that its form and content differ at least somewhat from country to country, it has not begun to address whether CSR practices converge or diverge over time as countries benefit from higher levels of economic development, or whether these practices relate to specific cultural values and institutional structures. This paper proposes an initial conceptual model and propositions to begin to assess whether and how the different levels of economic development, cultural values, (...)
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  18. Harry J. van Buren Iii & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2006). Stages of Economic Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Civil Society. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:170-172.
    This paper begins to examine the question of where societal expectations about the nature of corporate social responsibility come from. In particular, we begin to consider arguments about how a country’s stage of economic development affects the kinds of social responsibility expectations that firms face and then how the nature of a country’s civil society might affect CSR expectations. The factors that should be taken into account for future empirical research are also considered.
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  19. Harry J. van Buren Iii, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Douglas E. Thomas (2006). The Evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in Mexico. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:173-177.
    This paper begins to explore how corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved in Mexico. It looks at Mexico's social and political history to see the values that shaped expectations about how Mexican firms should address the needs and desires of their stakeholders in various periods in the 20th century. Particular attention is given to firms in Monterrey because they pioneered a form of company paternalism that reflected early CSR initiatives. Finally the paper briefly examines some contemporary CSR practices by large (...)
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  20. Jeanne M. Logsdon, Kimberly S. Davenport, Edwin A. Epstein, Patsy G. Lewellyn & Donna J. Wood (2005). Creating a Better World. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:368-372.
    This workshop introduced the concept of global business citizenship and explored several ways to use the model, its underlying theory, and cases representing it in classroom teaching. Links to peace studies, organizational change exercises, accountability resources, and the use of United Nations Global Compact case studies all received attention.
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  21. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2005). Confronting the Paradox. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:142-147.
    Both positive and negative consequences typically result from business activities for all types of stakeholders. How these consequences are judged is at the heart of economics and ethics, sociology and political economy. For example, the poorly run supermarket in a low-income community that charges exorbitantly high prices rarely gets our sympathy, and we often call for more competition to bring down prices and improve customer service. At the same time, small businesses that serve their customers well and provide a modest (...)
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  22. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2005). Global Business Citizenship and Voluntary Codes of Ethical Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):55 - 67.
    This article describes the theory and process of global business citizenship (GBC) and applies it in an analysis of characteristics of company codes of business conduct. GBC is distinguished from a commonly used term, “corporate citizenship,” which often denotes corporate community involvement and philanthropy. The GBC process requires (1) a set of fundamental values embedded in the corporate code of conduct and in corporate policies that reflect universal ethical standards; (2) implementation throughout the organization with thoughtful awareness of where the (...)
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  23. Jeanne M. Logsdon (2004). Global Business Citizenship: Applications to Environmental Issues. Business and Society Review 109 (1):67-87.
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  24. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2002). Business Citizenship: From Domestic to Global Level of Analysis. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):155-188.
    Abstract: In this article we first review the development of the concept of global business citizenship and show how the libertarian political philosophy of free-market capitalism must give way to a communitarian view in order for the voluntaristic, local notion of “corporate citizenship” to take root. We then distinguish the concept of global business citizenship from “corporate citizenship” by showing how the former concept requires a transition from communitarian thinking to a position of universal human rights. In addition, we link (...)
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  25. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2002). Reputation as an Emerging Construct in the Business and Society Field an Introduction. Business and Society 41 (4):365-370.
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  26. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Patsy G. Lewellyn (2000). Expanding Accountability to Stakeholders: Trends and Predictions. Business and Society Review 105 (4):419-435.
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  27. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Kristi Yuthas (1997). Corporate Social Performance, Stakeholder Orientation, and Organizational Moral Development. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1213-1226.
    This article begins with an explanation of how moral development for organizations has parallels to Kohlberg's categorization of the levels of individual moral development. Then the levels of organizational moral development are integrated into the literature on corporate social performance by relating them to different stakeholder orientations. Finally, the authors propose a model of organizational moral development that emphasizes the role of top management in creating organizational processes that shape the organizational and institutional components of corporate social performance. This article (...)
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  28. Jeanne M. Logsdon (1996). Just a Classic? Assessment and Reflections on Private Management and Public Policy. Business and Society 35 (4):454-459.
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  29. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Steven L. Wartick (1995). Commentary Theoretically Based Applications and Implications for Using the Brown and Perry Database. Business and Society 34 (2):222-226.
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  30. Jeanne M. Logsdon, Judith Kenner Thompson & Richard A. Reid (1994). Software Piracy: Is It Related to Level of Moral Judgment? Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):849 - 857.
    The possible relationship between widespread unauthorized copying of microcomputer software (also known as software piracy) and level of moral judgment is examined through analysis of over 350 survey questionnaires that included the Defining Issues Test as a measure of moral development. It is hypothesized that the higher one''s level of moral judgment, the less likely that one will approve of or engage in unauthorized copying. Analysis of the data indicate a high level of tolerance toward unauthorized copying and limited support (...)
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  31. Jacqueline N. Hood, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Judith Kenner Thompson (1993). Collaboration for Social Problem Solving: A Process Model. Business and Society 32 (1):1-17.
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  32. F. Neil Brady & Jeanne M. Logsdon (1988). Zimbardo's “Stanford Prison Experiment” and the Relevance of Social Psychology for Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (9):703 - 710.
    The prevailing pedagogical approach in business ethics generally underestimates or even ignores the powerful influences of situational factors on ethical analysis and decision-making. This is due largely to the predominance of philosophy-oriented teaching materials. Social psychology offers relevant concepts and experiments that can broaden pedagogy to help students understand more fully the influence of situational contexts and role expectations in ethical analysis. Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment is used to illustrate the relevance of social psychology experiments for business ethics instruction.
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  33. Jeanne M. Logsdon & David R. Palmer (1988). Issues Management and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (3):191 - 198.
    Issues management (IM) is becoming widely accepted in the business-and-society literature as a policy tool to enhance the social performance of corporations. Its acceptance is based on the presumption that firms have incorporated ethical norms into their decision-making process. This paper argues that IM is simply a technique to identify, analyze, and respond to social issues. It can be used either to improve or forestall corporate social performance. Different values will steer IM practitioners in different policy directions.If IM is to (...)
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