Search results for 'Jeannie Morgan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Caitlin Janzen, Susan Strega, Leslie Brown, Jeannie Morgan & Jeannine Carrière (2013). “Nothing Short of a Horror Show”: Triggering Abjection of Street Workers in Western Canadian Newspapers. Hypatia 28 (1):142-162.
    Over the past decade, Canadian media coverage of street sex work has steadily increased. The majority of this interest pertains to graphic violence against street sex workers, most notably from Vancouver, British Columbia. In this article, the authors analyze newspaper coverage that appeared in western Canadian publications between 2006 and 2009. In theorizing the violence both depicted and perpetrated by newspapers, the authors propose an analytic framework capable of attending to the process of othering in all of its complexity. To (...)
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  2. Mervyn Hartwig & Jamie Morgan (eds.) (2012). Critical Realism and Spirituality: Theism, Atheism, and Meta-Reality / Edited by Mervyn Hartwig and Jamie Morgan. Routledge.
    The rise of neo-integrative worldviews : towards a rational spirituality for the coming planetary civilization -- Beyond fundamentalism : spiritual realism, spiritual literacy and education -- Realism, literature and spirituality -- Judgemental rationality and the equivalence of argument : realism about God, response to Morgan's critique -- Transcendence and God : reflections on critical realism, the "new atheism", and Christian theology -- Human sciences at the edge of panentheism : God and the limits of ontological realism -- Beyond East (...)
     
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  3.  0
    John Henry Morgan (2010). John Henry Morgan. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):175-202.
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  4. Natasha Morgan (2009). 'The Mission of Poetry is to Make Us Alive'-Natasha Morgan Plans a Poetic Revolution. Philosophy Now 74:33.
     
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  5.  0
    John Morgan & Antonio Pace (1963). Two New Letters From John Morgan's Italian Travels. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 54:475-479.
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  6. George John Romanes & Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1897). Essays, Ed. By C.L. Morgan.
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  7. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, J. Pierpont Morgan & Albert Schinz (1925). La Collection Jean-Jacques Rousseau de la Bibliothèque [de] J. Pierpont Morgan Lettres, Notes Manusrites [!] Et Éditions. Smith College.
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  8.  13
    Michael L. Morgan (2007/2009). Discovering Levinas. Cambridge University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is well known to students of twentieth-century continental philosophy and especially French philosophy. But he is largely unknown within the circles of Anglo-American philosophy. In Discovering Levinas, Michael L. Morgan shows how this thinker faces in novel and provocative ways central philosophical problems of twentieth century philosophy and religious thought. He tackles this task by placing Levinas in conversation with philosophers such as Donald Davidson, Stanley Cavell, John McDowell, Onora O'Neill, Charles Taylor, and Cora Diamond. He also (...)
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  9.  91
    Mary S. Morgan & Till Grüne-Yanoff (2013). Modeling Practices in the Social and Human Sciences. An Interdisciplinary Exchange. Perspectives on Science 21 (2):143-156.
    Philosophers of science studying scientific practice often consider it a methodological requirement that their conceptualization of "model" closely connects with the understanding and use of models by practicing scientists. Occasionally, this connection has been explicitly made (Hutten 1954, Suppes 1961, Morgan and Morrison 1999, Bailer-Jones 2002, Lehtinen and Kuorikoski 2007, Kuorikoski 2007, Morgan 2012a). These studies have been dominated by a focus on the—relatively similar forms of—mathematical models in physics and economics. Yet it has become increasingly evident that (...)
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  10.  2
    Jamie Morgan (2013). Landmarks? Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):5 - 12.
    Landmarks? Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Pages 5-12 Authors Jamie Morgan, Leeds Metropolitan University Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 12 Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 1 / 2013.
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  11.  53
    Anne Morgan (2008). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics of Freedom and Absolute Evil. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 75-89.
    Simone de Beauvoir held that human experience is intrinsically ambiguous and that there are no values extrinsic to experience, but she also designated some actions as absolute evil. This essay explains how Beauvoir utilized an intrinsic absolute value to ground an action-guiding principle of freedom that justifies her notion of evil. Morgan’s analysis counters Robin May Schott’s objections that Beauvoir failed to systematically justify her notion of absolute evil and that Beauvoir shifted from a “logic of action” to a (...)
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  12.  10
    Peter Howlett & Mary S. Morgan (eds.) (2010). How Well Do Facts Travel?: The Dissemination of Reliable Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Travelling facts Mary S. Morgan; Part I. Matters of Fact: 2. Facts and building artefacts: what travels in material objects? Simona Valeriani; 3. A journey through times and cultures? Ancient Greek forms in American 19th century architecture: an archaeological view Lambert Schneider; 4. Manning's N: putting roughness to work Sarah J. Whatmore and Catharina Landström; 5. My facts are better than your facts: spreading good news about global warming Naomi Oreskes; 6. Real problems with (...)
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  13.  7
    Eileen Morgan (1998). Navigating Cross-Cultural Ethics: What Global Managers Do Right to Keep From Going Wrong. Butterworth-Heinemann.
    Through the personal stories of managers running global business, this book takes an inside look into the dilemmas of managers who are asked to make profits ethically according to the dictates of their company's ethics code. It examines what companies `think" they are doing to help managers in those situations and how those managers are actually affected. Thanks to the boost from the 1991 Sentencing Guidelines which minimizes penalties for companies with ethics codes caught in ethical wrongdoing, more than 85% (...)
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  14.  8
    Jamie Morgan (2015). Seeing the Potential of Realism in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 45 (2):176-201.
    In this article, I clarify some of the key concepts and commitments of realist social ontology in economics. To do so, I make use of a recent critique of Lawson’s Reorienting Economics by Mohun and Veneziani. Their article provides a useful foil because responding to their critique allows us to emphasize that realism’s claims are more conditional and less controversial than one might otherwise anticipate. The basic claim is that ontology matters and that explicit recognition and consideration of ontological issues (...)
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  15.  5
    Charner Perry & Douglas Morgan (1958). Philosophy in the Education of Teachers. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 32:139 - 144.
    The following is a joint report of the Committee on Philosophy in Education of the American Philosophical Association and of the Committee on Cooperation with the American Philosophical Association of the Philosophy of Education Society. The report has been approved by the Executive Committee of the Philosophy of Education Society and by the Board of Officers of the American Philosophical Association (September, 1959). The Committee of the American Philosophical Association was composed of the following: C. W. Hendel, Chairman, H. G. (...)
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  16.  9
    Douglas N. Morgan & Charner Perry (1958). The Teaching of Philosophy in American High Schools. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 32:91 - 137.
    The following statement is a report of the Committee on Philosophy in Education of the American Philosophical Association and was approved by the Association's Board of Officers in December, 1958. The Committee was composed of the following: C. W. Hendel, Chairman, H. G. Alexander, R. M. Chisholm, Max Fisch, Lucius Garvin, Douglas Morgan, A. E. Murphy, Charner Perry and R. G. Turnbull. Primary responsibility for the preparation of this report belonged to a subcommittee composed of Douglas N. (...)
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  17.  3
    Robert P. Morgan (1984). Secret Languages: The Roots of Musical Modernism. Critical Inquiry 10 (3):442.
    It is frequently noted that a “crisis in language” accompanied the profound changes in human consciousness everywhere evident near the turn of the century. As the nature of reality itself became problematic—or at least suspect, distrusted for its imposition of limits upon individual imagination—so, necessarily, did the relationship of language to reality. Thus in the later nineteenth century, the adequacy of an essentially standardized form of “classical” writing was increasingly questioned as an effective vehicle for artistic expression: even though often (...)
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  18.  2
    Robert P. Morgan (1980). Musical Time/Musical Space. Critical Inquiry 6 (3):527.
    There is no question, of course, that music is a temporal art. Stravinsky, noting that it is inconceivable apart from the elements of sound and time, classifies it quite simply as "a certain organization in time, a chrononomy."1 His definition stands as part of a long and honored tradition that encompasses such diverse figures as Racine, Lessing, and Schopenhauer. Schopenhauer, putting the case in its strongest terms, remarks that music is "perceived solely in and through time, to the complete exclusion (...)
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  19.  5
    Ruth Morgan (2011). Counting on the Weather. Metascience 20 (3):585-588.
    Counting on the weather Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9503-3 Authors Ruth Morgan, History Discipline, Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  20.  2
    Jamie Morgan (2013). The End of the Beginning. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):99 - 111.
    In the following short essay I set out the key insights and main arguments in Nick Hostettler’s Eurocentrism . This text is an important contribution to the potential for creative elaboration inherent in Roy Bhaskar’s Dialectic and is also a substantive achievement in its own right. Hostettler’s work provides a way to move beyond the partialities and tensions of eurocentrism and anti-eurocentrism by repositioning both in terms of the europic. There are, however, a number of potential limitations in the way (...)
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  21.  0
    William W. Morgan (1976). Feminism and Literary Study: A Reply to Annette Kolodny. Critical Inquiry 2 (4):807.
    Like Kolodny, I think feminism one of the most vital and energizing forces in literary criticism today, but for two reasons I found her exposition of the topic disappointing. It seems to me that she underplays the most crucial of the many aesthetic and pedagogical issues raised by feminist literary study, and she endorses a kind of intellectual defeatism when, in the conclusion of her essay, she places a "Posted" sign between the male readers of Critical Inquiry and her own (...)
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  22.  8
    Diane Morgan (2000). Kant Trouble: The Obscurities of the Enlightened. Routledge.
    Kant Trouble offers a highly original and incisive reading of some of the lesser known and less lucid aspects of Kantian thought. Diane Morgan focuses her investigation on a radical reappraisal of Kant's writings on architecture, monarchy and faith in progress. She challenges the widely held view of Kant as the exponent of concrete and rigid rationality, and argues that his airtight "architectonic" mode of reasoning, which Kant identified in The Critique of Pure Reason, overlooks certain topics which destabilize (...)
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  23.  0
    Robert P. Morgan (1977). On the Analysis of Recent Music. Critical Inquiry 4 (1):33.
    According to [Edward T.] Cone, then, there is a great deal of music written today that is simply no longer susceptible to analysis. If this is true, it can mean one of several things. First, it may indicate that, although there are new compositions that one finds interesting and representative of the period in which we live, the music simply does not lend itself to analysis. Thus, even if we enjoy and admire this music, there is not much that we (...)
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  24. Teresa Morgan (2007). Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire. Cambridge University Press.
    Morality is one of the fundamental structures of any society, enabling complex groups to form, negotiate their internal differences and persist through time. In the first book-length study of Roman popular morality, Dr Morgan argues that we can recover much of the moral thinking of people across the Empire. Her study draws on proverbs, fables, exemplary stories and gnomic quotations, to explore how morality worked as a system for Roman society as a whole and in individual lives. She examines (...)
     
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  25. Diane Morgan (2001). The Best Guide to Eastern Philosophy and Religion. Renaissance Books.
    The Best Guide to Eastern Philosophy & Religion provides a thorough discussion of the most widely practices belief systems of the East. Author Diane Morgan understands how to direct the materialistic, linear way of Western thinking toward a comprehension of the cyclical, metaphysical essence of Eastern philosophy. With an emphasis on the tenets and customs that Wester seekers find most compelling, this text is accessible to the novice yet sophisticated enough for the experienced reader. Inside, you'll find complete coverage (...)
     
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  26. Margaret Morrison & Mary Morgan (eds.) (1999). Models as Mediators.
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  27. Kathryn Pauly Morgan (1991). Women and the Knife: Cosmetic Surgery and the Colonization of Women's Bodies. Hypatia 6 (3):25 - 53.
    The paper identifies the phenomenal rise of increasingly invasive forms of elective cosmetic surgery targeted primarily at women and explores its significance in the context of contemporary biotechnology. A Foucauldian analysis of the significance of the normalization of technologized women's bodies is argued for. Three "Paradoxes of Choice" affecting women who "elect" cosmetic surgery are examined. Finally, two utopian feminist political responses are discussed: a Response of Refusal and a Response of Appropriation.
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  28. Daniel Morgan (2010). Rethinking Bazin : Ontology and Realist Aesthetics. In Marc Furstenau (ed.), The Film Theory Reader: Debates and Arguments. Routledge 443-481.
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  29.  40
    Jamie Morgan (2003). Addressing Human Wrongs: A Philosophy-of-Ontology Perspective. Philosophy East and West 53 (4):575-587.
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  30.  24
    Mary S. Morgan (2005). Experiments Versus Models: New Phenomena, Inference and Surprise. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):317-329.
    A comparison of models and experiments supports the argument that although both function as mediators and can be understood to work in an experimental mode, experiments offer greater epistemic power than models as a means to investigate the economic world. This outcome rests on the distinction that whereas experiments are versions of the real world captured within an artificial laboratory environment, models are artificial worlds built to represent the real world. This difference in ontology has epistemic consequences: experiments have greater (...)
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  31.  15
    Liz Gulliford, Blaire Morgan & Kristján Kristjánsson (2013). Recent Work on the Concept of Gratitude in Philosophy and Psychology. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (3):285-317.
  32.  22
    Mary S. Morgan (2001). Models, Stories and the Economic World. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (3):361-384.
    Stories form an integral part of models. An economic model can not be fully characterized simply by knowing its structure: the model can only be completely described when we know how it works and what it can do. This activity of manipulating a model requires a narrative device, such as a question, which sets off a story told with the model. The structure or system portrayed in the model constrains and shapes the stories that can be told, but without stories (...)
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  33.  95
    William J. Morgan (2014). Games, Rules, and Conventions. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):383-401.
    In a recent article in this journal, Del Mar offered two main criticisms of Marmor’s account of social conventions. The first took issue with Marmor’s claim that the constitutive rules of games and kindred social practices determine in an objective way their central aims and values; the second charged Marmor with scanting the historical context in which conventions do their important normative work in shaping the goals of games. I argue that Del Mar’s criticism of Marmor’s account of the normative (...)
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  34.  9
    C. Lloyd Morgan (1903). An Introduction to Comparative Psychology. London: Walter Scott Publishing.
  35.  13
    Gregory J. Morgan (1998). Emile Zuckerkandl, Linus Pauling, and the Molecular Evolutionary Clock, 1959-1965. Journal of the History of Biology 31 (2):155 - 178.
  36.  37
    C. Lloyd Morgan (1923). Emergent Evolution. Williams and Norgate.
    EMERGENT EVOLUTION- THE GIFFORD LECTURES DELIVERED IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ST.
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  37.  73
    Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Laws of Biological Design: A Reply to John Beatty. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):379-389.
    In this paper, I argue against John Beatty’s position in his paper “The Evolutionary Contingency Thesis” by counterexample. Beatty argues that there are no distinctly biological laws because the outcomes of the evolutionary processes are contingent. I argue that the heart of the Caspar–Klug theory of virus structure—that spherical virus capsids consist of 60T subunits (where T = k 2 + hk + h 2 and h and k are integers)—is a distinctly biological law even if the existence of spherical (...)
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  38.  8
    Jamie Morgan (2007). What is Meta-Reality? Alternative Interpretations of the Argument. Journal of Critical Realism 1 (2):115-146.
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  39. M. S. Morgan (2013). Nature's Experiments and Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):341-357.
    This article explores the characteristics of research sites that scientists have called “natural experiments” to understand and develop usable distinctions for the social sciences between “Nature’s or Society’s experiments” and “natural experiments.” In this analysis, natural experiments emerge as the retro-fitting by social scientists of events that have happened in the social world into the traditional forms of field or randomized trial experiments. By contrast, “Society’s experiments” figure as events in the world that happen in circumstances that are already sufficiently (...)
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  40. Michael L. Morgan (2008). On Shame. Routledge.
    Shame, the Holocaust, and dark times -- Locating moral shame -- Film, literature, and the ramification of shame -- Beyond shame : emotional reaction and moral response.
     
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  41. Seiriol Morgan (2009). Can There Be a Kantian Consequentialism? Ratio 22 (1):19-40.
    In On What Matters Derek Parfit argues that we need to make a significant reassessment of the relationship between some central positions in moral philosophy, because, contrary to received opinion, Kantians, contractualists and consequentialists are all 'climbing the same mountain on different sides'. In Parfit's view Kant's own attempt to outline an account of moral obligation fails, but when it is modified in ways entirely congenial to his thinking, a defensible Kantian contractualism can be produced, which survives the objections which (...)
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  42.  0
    Michael J. Morgan (1977). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. Cambridge University Press.
  43.  38
    Mary S. Morgan (2004). Imagination and Imaging in Model Building. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):753-766.
    Modelling became one of the primary tools of mathematical economic research in the twentieth century, but when we look at examples of how nonanalogical models were first built in economics, both the process of making representations and aspects of the representing relation remain opaque. Like early astronomers, economists have to imagine how the hidden parts of their world are arranged and to make images, that is, create models, to represent how they work. The case of the Edgeworth Box, a model (...)
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  44.  9
    Drew Morgan (2006). Newman the Businessman. Newman Studies Journal 3 (1):73-74.
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  45.  72
    Seiriol Morgan (2005). The Missing Formal Proof of Humanity's Radical Evil in Kant's Religion. Philosophical Review 114 (1):63-114.
  46. Seiriol Morgan (2003). Dark Desires. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):377-410.
    An influential view of sexual morality claims that participant consent is sufficient for the moral permissibility of a sexual act. I argue that the complex and frequently dark nature of sexual desire precludes this, because some sexual desire has a character such that it should not be gratified, even if this were consented to. I illustrate this with a discussion of a famous literary character, the Vicomte de Valmont, and draw on Kant's anthropology to illuminate the nature of such desire, (...)
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  47.  0
    Jamie Morgan (2013). Reality Without Disjoints. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (2):244 - 254.
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  48.  34
    A. Guilherme & W. John Morgan (2009). Martin Buber’s Philosophy of Education and its Implications for Non-Formal Education. International Journal of Lifelong Learning 28 (5).
    The Jewish philosopher and educator Martin Buber (1878–1965) is considered one of the twentieth century’s greatest contributors to the philosophy of religion and is also recognized as the pre-eminent scholar of Hasidism. He has also attracted considerable attention as a philosopher of education. However, most commentaries on this aspect of his work have focussed on the implications of his philosophy for formal education and for the education of the child. Given that much of Buber’s philosophy is based on dialogue, on (...)
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  49.  7
    Vance Morgan (2000). Parachutes, Ticks & Moral Environments. Philosophy Now 26:12-15.
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  50.  6
    C. Lloyd Morgan (1897). The Realities of Experience. The Monist 8 (1):1-18.
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