Search results for 'Jeff Collin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gary Fooks, Anna Gilmore, Jeff Collin, Chris Holden & Kelley Lee (2013). The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility: Techniques of Neutralization, Stakeholder Management and Political CSR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):283-299.score: 120.0
    Since scholarly interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has primarily focused on the synergies between social and economic performance, our understanding of how (and the conditions under which) companies use CSR to produce policy outcomes that work against public welfare has remained comparatively underdeveloped. In particular, little is known about how corporate decision-makers privately reconcile the conflicts between public and private interests, even though this is likely to be relevant to understanding the limitations of CSR as a means of aligning (...)
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  2. Finn Collin (2001). Bunge and Hacking on Constructivism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (3):424-453.score: 30.0
  3. Finn Collin (1997). Social Reality. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Social reality is a key problem in the philosophy of social science. Outlining the major historical and contemporary issues raised by the social reality and social facts, this book has something to offer both philosophers and social scientists. To the former is shows how the well-worn topic of realism versus anti-realism assumes new and interestingly varied forms when social reality is substituted for physical reality. For the social scientist, the book offers conceptual clarification of key issues in recent social science (...)
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  4. Finn Collin (1998). Semantic Holism in Social Science. Philosophical Explorations 1 (3):201 – 214.score: 30.0
    In the debate between internalists and externalists in philosophy of language and philosophy of psychology, internalists such as Jerry Fodor have invoked a strong a priori argument to show that externalist descriptions can play no role in a science of the human mind and of human action. Shifting the ground of the debate from psychology to social science, I try to undermine Fodor's reasoning. I also point to a role for externalist theorising in the area where the socio-semantic theory of (...)
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  5. Finn Collin (2003). Judging Kuhn by His Fruits, Or: Guilt by Association? Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):141 – 145.score: 30.0
  6. Remy Collin (1935). Domaine de la Biologie Théorique. Acta Biotheoretica 1 (1-2).score: 30.0
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  7. Françoise Collin (1999). Birth as Praxis. In Joke J. Hermsen & Dana Richard Villa (eds.), The Judge and the Spectator: Hannah Arendt's Political Philosophy. Peeters.score: 30.0
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  8. Finn Collin (1985). Theory and Understanding: A Critique of Interpretive Social Science. B. Blackwell.score: 30.0
  9. Rodney Collin (1968/1984). The Theory of Celestial Influence: Man, the Universe, and Cosmic Mystery. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.score: 30.0
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  10. Finn Collin & Anders Engstrøm (2001). Metaphor and Truth-Conditional Semantics: Meaning as Process and Product. Theoria 67 (1):75-92.score: 20.0
  11. F. Collin (2010). Between Poiesis and Praxis: Women and Art. Diogenes 57 (1):83-92.score: 20.0
    If we think of artistic creation as a basic dimension of humanity we need to question the absence of female artists in history. We should also look at their gradual emergence in the late 20th century, an emergence that coincides with the feminist movement and a change in the conception of art itself, revealed chiefly by Duchamp. But does art by women have some specificity? Without giving a definite answer as far as subject matter is concerned, we note that the (...)
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  12. Julie Zahle & Finn Collin (2012). Conference on the Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2011. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):133-136.score: 20.0
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  13. Julie Zahle & Finn Collin (2013). ENPOSS 2012: The First Conference of the European Network for the Philosophy of the Social Sciences (Copenhagen, September 21–23, 2012). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 44 (1):225-226.score: 20.0
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  14. R. J. Collin (1952). Plato's Use of the Word MANTEYOMAI. Classical Quarterly 2 (1-2):93-.score: 20.0
  15. Finn Collin (2001). Guest Editor's Preface. Theoria 67 (1):4-6.score: 20.0
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  16. Finn Collin (1987). Meta-Constraints Upon Interpretation. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):137 - 148.score: 20.0
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  17. Françoise Collin (1995). Subjekt Und Geschlechterdifferenz Seminar Am Collège International de Philosophie, Paris. Die Philosophin 6 (11):120-123.score: 20.0
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  18. Finn Collin (2008). The Strong Programme. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:43-49.score: 20.0
    The strong programme in the sociology of science is officially "inductively" based, generalizing a number of highly acclaimed case studies into a general approach to the social study of science. However, at a critical juncture, the programme allies itself with certain radical ideas in philosophical semantics, notablyWittgenstein's "rule following considerations". The result is an implausible, radical conventionalist view of natural science which undermines the empirical programme.
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  19. Françoise Collin (2002). Du Sexe Sans Génération à la Génération Sans Sexe. Cités 9 (1):39.score: 20.0
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  20. Finn Collin (1987). Understanding Social Science. Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):410-411.score: 20.0
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  21. Jeff Kochan (2012). Review of Finn Collin, Science Studies as Naturalized Philosophy. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (1):121-124.score: 15.0
    Review of: Finn Collin (2011), Science Studies as Naturalized Philosophy (Dordecht: Springer).
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  22. Volker Dieringer (2009). Is a Jamesian Wager the Only Safe Bet? On Jeff Jordan's New Book on Pascal's Wager. Archiv für Geschichte Der Philosophie 91 (2):237-247.score: 12.0
    In his new book on Pascal's Wager, Jeff Jordan argues that only the ‘Jamesian’ version of the wager argument, as he sees it presented in William James' essay The Will to Believe , constitutes a sound pragmatic argument in favour of theism, whereas Pascal's original wager argument is doomed to fail on various grounds. This article argues that Jordan's theory is untenable. The many-gods objection is used as an example: it is demonstrated that the Jamesian Wager argument too is (...)
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  23. Re'em Segev (2007). Lesser Evil and Responsibility: Comments on Jeff McMahan's Analysis of the Morality of War. Israel Law Review 40 (3):709-729.score: 12.0
    The main aim of Jeff McMahan's manuscript on the morality of war is to answer the question: why and accordingly when is it justified or permissible to kill people in war? However, McMahan argues that the same principles apply to individual actions and to war. McMahan rejects all doctrines of collective responsibility and liability. His claim is that every individual is liable for what he has done and not for the actions of others - even if both are part (...)
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  24. Christopher Norris (2004). Reply to Jeff Malpas: On Truth, Realism, Changing One's Mind About Davidson (Not Heidegger), and Related Topics. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):357 – 374.score: 12.0
    This essay responds to Jeff Malpas's foregoing article, itself written in response to my various publications over the past two decades concerning Donald Davidson's ideas about truth, meaning, and interpretation. It has to do mainly with our disagreement as regards the substantive content of Davidson's truth-based semantic approach in relation to the problematic legacy of logical empiricism, including Quine's incisive but no less problematical critique of that legacy. I also raise questions with respect to Malpas's coupling of Davidson with (...)
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  25. Ross Parker (2013). Deep and Wide: A Response to Jeff Jordan on Divine Love. Faith and Philosophy 30 (4):444-461.score: 12.0
    Recently Jeff Jordan has argued against the view that divine perfection would require God to love every human with equal maximal intensity. He asserts that his argument depends on principles of perfect being theology which he develops and defends. In this paper I argue that Jordan’s case can be better understood as two conceptually distinct arguments, only one of which depends on his proffered principles of perfect being theology. I then critically evaluate each of these arguments, arguing that both (...)
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  26. Peter Suber, Review of Jeff Mason, Philosophical Rhetoric. [REVIEW]score: 12.0
    Can we interpret human reason simultaneously as a product of neurochemistry and natural selection and as a transcendental standard? Jeff Mason asks the analogous question of philosophical writing. Can we interpret philosophical discourse as "rhetorical," embodied in language, and designed to persuade historical audiences, and at the same time preserve its traditional intention to disclose truths that transcend language, history, and audiences? Mason argues that these polar attitudes toward philosophical writing are untenable precisely when they exclude each other. This (...)
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  27. Angie Biondi (2010). Imagens do cotidiano ou o real construído? O jogo do real e do ficcional na narrativa fotográfica de Jeff Wall. Logos 17 (1):17-28.score: 12.0
    Este texto observa alguns aspectos da relação entre fotografia e produção de um discurso sobre o cotidiano contemporâneo, através do trabalho de Jeff Wall. O que se inscreve nestas imagens é a proposição de um diálogo entre espaço e personagem, como duas figuras narrativas privilegiadas, vistas sob o jogo de uma inversão dos estatutos do real e do ficcional como elemento de uma estratégia visual responsável pela construção de uma releitura do cotidiano. Trata-se de observar os elementos enunciativos presentes (...)
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  28. Jeff Mcmahan (2010). 20 Cognitive Disability and Cognitive Enhancement Jeff McMahan. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 345.score: 12.0
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  29. Rahul Kumar (2008). Permissible Killing and the Irrelevance of Being Human. Journal of Ethics 12 (1):57 - 80.score: 9.0
    This is a review essay of Jeff McMahan's recent book The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life (OUP: 2002). In the first part, I lay out the central features of McMahan's account of the wrongness of killing and its implications for when it is permissible to kill. In the second part of the essay, I argue that we ought not to accept McMahan's rejection of species membership as having any bearing on whether it is permissible to (...)
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  30. Paul Bartha (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God – Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):571–574.score: 9.0
  31. Uwe Steinhoff (2012). Rights, Liability, and the Moral Equality of Combatants. Journal of Ethics 16 (4):339-366.score: 9.0
    According to the dominant position in the just war tradition from Augustine to Anscombe and beyond, there is no “moral equality of combatants.” That is, on the traditional view the combatants participating in a justified war may kill their enemy combatants participating in an unjustified war— but not vice versa (barring certain qualifications). I shall argue here, however, that in the large number of wars (and in practically all modern wars) where the combatants on the justified side violate the rights (...)
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  32. Christopher Toner (2010). The Logical Structure of Just War Theory. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):81-102.score: 9.0
    A survey of just war theory literature reveals the existence of quite different lists of principles. This apparent arbitrariness raises a number of questions: What is the relation between ad bellum and in bello principles? Why are there so many of the former and so few of the latter? What order is there among the various principles? To answer these questions, I first draw on some recent work by Jeff McMahan to show that ad bellum and in bello principles (...)
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  33. Roxana Baiasu (2009). Heidegger's Topology: Being, Place, World, by Jeff Malpas. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):315-323.score: 9.0
  34. N. Athanassoulis (2005). Jeff McMahan, the Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life, New York, Oxford University Press, 2002, Pp. VII+540. Utilitas 17 (1):117-119.score: 9.0
  35. Uwe Steinhoff (2008). Debate: Jeff McMahan on the Moral Inequality of Combatants. Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (2):220–226.score: 9.0
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  36. Daniel Howard-Snyder, Trinity. The Routledge Online Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 9.0
    This 9,000+ word entry briefly assesses five models of the Trinity, those espoused by (i) Richard Swinburne, (ii) William Lane Craig, (iii) Brian Leftow, (iv) Jeff Brower and Michael Rea, and (v) Peter van Inwagen.
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  37. Don Marquis (2003). Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life:The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life. Ethics 113 (2):437-440.score: 9.0
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  38. Nils Holtug (2011). Killing and the Time-Relative Interest Account. Journal of Ethics 15 (3):169-189.score: 9.0
    Jeff McMahan appeals to what he calls the “Time-relative Interest Account of the Wrongness of Killing” to explain the wrongness of killing individuals who are conscious but not autonomous. On this account, the wrongness of such killing depends on the victim’s interest in his or her future, and this interest, in turn, depends on two things: the goods that would have accrued to the victim in the future; and the strength of the prudential relations obtaining between the victim at (...)
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  39. Douglas P. Lackey (2010). Killing in War – by Jeff McMahan. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):212-215.score: 9.0
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  40. Robert Danderson (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God - by Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (1):94-96.score: 9.0
  41. Christopher Grau, McMahan on Speciesism and Deprivation.score: 9.0
    Jeff McMahan has shown himself to be a vigorous and incisive critic of speciesism, and he has been particularly critical of speciesist arguments that draw inspiration from Wittgenstein. In this essay I argue that McMahan’s ethical framework (as outlined in The Ethics of Killing) is more nuanced and more open to the incorporation of speciesist intuitions regarding deprivation than he himself sometimes suggests. I will also argue that a sensible speciesism can be pluralist and flexible enough to accommodate many (...)
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  42. Michael Lacewing (2002). Review of Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (11).score: 9.0
  43. Micheal Walzer (2006). Response to Jeff McMahan. Philosophia 34 (1):19-21.score: 9.0
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  44. Peter Nichols (2012). Abortion, Time-Relative Interests, and Futures Like Ours. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (4):493-506.score: 9.0
    Don Marquis ( 1989 ) has argued most abortions are immoral, for the same reason that killing you or me is immoral: abortion deprives the fetus of a valuable future (FLO). Call this account the FLOA. A rival account is Jeff McMahan’s ( 2002 ), time-relative interest account (TRIA) of the wrongness of killing. According to this account, an act of killing is wrong to the extent that it deprives the victim of future value and the relation of psychological (...)
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  45. Carleton B. Christensen (2001). Place and Experience: A Philosophical Topography. Jeff E. Malpas. Mind 110 (439):789-792.score: 9.0
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  46. Nate Zuckerman (2010). Steven Crowell and Jeff Malpas (Eds): Transcendental Heidegger. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):575-578.score: 9.0
  47. Paul Saka (2007). Jeff Jordan Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006). Pp. X+227. $65.00; £35.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0199291328. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 43 (4):492-496.score: 9.0
  48. David Kolb (2007). Review of Jeff Malpas, Heidegger's Topology: Being, Place, World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).score: 9.0
  49. Gerald Lang (2010). Review of N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen, Jeff McMahan (Eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).score: 9.0
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  50. Soren Holm (2000). John McKie, Jeff Richardson, Peter Singer, and Helga Kuhse, The Allocation of Health Care Resources: An Ethical Evaluation of the “QALY” Approach:The Allocation of Health Care Resources: An Ethical Evaluation of the “QALY” Approach. Ethics 110 (3):627-629.score: 9.0
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