50 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Jeffrey Foss [23]Jeffrey E. Foss [15]Jeff Foss [13]
  1. Jeffrey Foss (ed.) (2013). Science and the World: Philosophical Approaches. Broadview Press.
    This new anthology includes both classic and contemporary readings on the methods and scope of science. Jeffrey Foss depicts science in a broadly humanistic context, contending that it is philosophically interesting because it has reshaped nearly all aspects of human culture—and in so doing has reshaped humanity as well. While providing a strong introduction to epistemological and metaphysical issues in science, this text goes beyond the traditional topics, enlarging the scope of philosophical engagement with science. Substantial introductions and critical questions (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jeffrey Foss (2011). Just the Facts, and Only the Facts, About Human Rationality? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):254-255.
    Elqayam & Evans' (E&E's) laudable program to keep the scientific investigation of human reasoning norm-free and focused on the facts alone is an essential part of a long tradition in the philosophy of science – but it faces deeper difficulties than the authors seem to realize, since reasoning is a competence, and the very concept of competence is normative.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jeff Foss (2009). The Scientific Explanation of Colour Qualia. Dialogue 48 (03):479-.
    ABSTRACT: Qualia, the subjectively known qualities of conscious experience, are judged by many philosophers and scientists to lie beyond the domain of scientific explanation, thus making the conscious mind partly incomprehensible to the objective physical sciences. Some, like Kripke and Chalmers, employ modal logic to argue that explanations of qualia are impossible in principle. I argue that there already exist perfectly normal scientific explanations of qualia, and rebut the arguments of those who deny this possibility.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jeffrey E. Foss (2008). Beyond Environmentalism: A Philosophy of Nature. Wiley.
    Beyond Environmentalism is the first book of its kind to present a timely and relevant analysis of environmentalism.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jeff Foss (2007). Only Three Dimensions and the Mother of Invention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):370-370.
    Although the first three dimensions of evolution outlined by Jablonka & Lamb (J&L) are persuasively presented as aspects of evolutionary science, the fourth dimension, symbolic evolution, is problematic: Though it may in some metaphorical sense be happening, there cannot be a science of symbolic evolution. Symbolic evolution essentially involves meaning, which, besides being nonphysical, resolutely resists scientific categorization.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jeffrey Foss (2007). Game Theory for Reformation of Behavioral Science Based on a Mistake. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):24-25.
    Gintis assumes the behavioral (=social) sciences are in disarray, and so proposes a theory for their unification. Examination of the unity of the physical sciences reveals he misunderstands the unity of science in general, and so fails to see that the social sciences are already unified with the physical sciences. Another explanation of the differences between them is outlined. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey Foss (2006). The Rituals of Explanation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):618-619.
    Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) explanation of ritualized behavior is plausible because it fits so well with elementary facts about evolution of plasticity in our behavioral repertoire. Its scope, however, may be broader than its authors explicitly admit. Science itself may be illuminated as ritual behavior. Science, like other rituals, can sustain both healthy and pathological forms. (Published Online February 8 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jeff Foss (2005). On Enlightenment. Dialogue 44 (1):194-196.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jeff Foss (2005). On Enlightenment David Stove Edited by Andrew Irvine Preface by Roger Kimball. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2003, Xxxvii + 185 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 44 (01):194-.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jeffrey Foss (2004). Good Science, Bad Philosophy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):791-792.
    Behrendt's & Young's (B&Y's) persuasive scientific theory explains hallucinations, and is supported by a wide variety of psychological evidence, both normal and abnormal – unlike their philosophical thesis, Kantian idealism. I argue that the evidence cited by the authors in support of idealism actually favors realism. Fortunately, their scientific theory is separable from their philosophy, and is methodologically consistent with realism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jeffrey Foss (2004). Patricia Smith Churchland, Brain-Wise: Studies in Neurophilosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (2):89-92.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jeffrey Foss (2004). Susan Haack, Defending Science-Within Reason: Between Scientism and Cynicism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (3):190-193.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jeffrey E. Foss (2000). Science and the Riddle of Consciousness: A Solution. Springer Netherlands.
    The questions examined in the book speak directly to neuroscientists, computer scientists, psychologists, and philosophers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jeffrey Foss (1998). Testosterone and the Second Sex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):374-375.
    Because the reciprocal theory of Mazur & Booth dominates the static basal model, given the evidence they present, it is worth considering the implications for women's equality, supposing it true. Testosterone might well give males a competitive edge, and hence higher status, creating an inequality that mere social legislation would be ill-suited to address. Further research on the role of testosterone is needed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jeffrey Foss (1997). Irresistible Environment Meets Immovable Neurons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):565-566.
    Quartz & Sejnowski's (Q&S's) main accomplishment is the presentation of increasing complexity in the developing brain. Although this cuts a colorful swath through current theories of learning, it leaves the central question untouched: How does the environment direct neural structure? In answer, Q&S offer us only Hebb's half-century-old suggestion once again.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jeffrey Foss (1997). Mad About Hue. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):189-189.
    Despite the heat of their attack, Saunders & van Brakel do illuminate various shortcomings of color research in the tradition of Berlin & Kay. Berlin and Kay elicit a pan-cultural pattern in color language, but the pattern does not provide much insight into the human mind.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jeffrey E. Foss (1997). How Many Beliefs Can Dance in the Head of the Self-Deceived? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):111-112.
    Mele desires to believe that the self-deceived have consistent beliefs. Beliefs are not observable, but are instead ascribed within an explanatory framework. Because explanatory cogency is the only criterion for belief attribution, Mele should carefully attend to the logic of belief-desire explanation. He does not, and the consistency of his own account as well as that of the self-deceived, are the victims.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeffrey Foss (1996). Arithmetic and Old Lace. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):252.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jeffrey Foss (1996). A Scientific Fix for the Classical Account of Addiction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):579.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jeffrey Foss (1996). Masters in Our Own House: A Reply to Brown. Dialogue 35 (01):165-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jeffrey E. Foss (1996). Is There a Natural Sexual Inequality of Intellect? A Reply to Kimura. Hypatia 11 (3):24 - 46.
    The noted psychologist, Doreen Kimura, has argued that we should not expect to find equal numbers of men and women in various professions because there is a natural sexual inequality of intellect. In rebuttal I argue that each of these mutually supporting theses is insufficiently supported by the evidence to be accepted. The social and ethical dimensions of Kimura's work, and of the scientific study of the nature-nurture controversy in general, are briefly discussed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jeffrey Foss (1995). On Seeking the Mythical Fountain of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):682.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jeffrey E. Foss (1995). Materialism, Reduction, Replacement, and the Place of Consciousness in Science. Journal of Philosophy 92 (8):401-29.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jeffrey E. Foss (1994). On the Evolution of Intentionality as Seen From the Intentional Stance. Inquiry 37 (3):287-310.
    Like everyone with a scientific bent of mind, Dennett thinks our capacity for meaningful language and states of mind is the product of evolution (Dennett [1987, ch. VIII]). But unlike many of this bent, he sees virtue in viewing evolution itself from the intentional stance. From this stance, ?Mother Nature?, or the process of evolution by natural selection, bestows intentionality upon us, hence we are not Unmeant Meaners. Thus, our intentionality is extrinsic, and Dennett dismisses the theories of meaning of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jeffrey E. Foss (1993). Ronald N. Giere, Ed., Cognitive Models of Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (6):311-315.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jeffrey E. Foss (1993). Subjectivity, Objectivity, and Nagel on Consciousness. Dialogue 32 (4):725-36.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jeffrey Foss (1992). John D. Greenwood, Ed., The Future of Folk Psychology: Intentionality and Cognitive Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (3):162-166.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jeffrey Foss (1992). Radu J. Bogdan, Ed., Mind and Common Sense: Philosophical Essays on Commonsense Psychology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (3):162-166.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jeffrey Foss (1992). Terrence Horgan and John Tienson, Eds., Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (6):398-400.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jeffrey E. Foss (1992). Introduction to the Epistemology of the Brain: Indeterminacy, Micro-Specificity, Chaos, and Openness. Topoi 11 (1):45-57.
    Given that the mind is the brain, as materialists insist, those who would understand the mind must understand the brain. Assuming that arrays of neural firing frequencies are highly salient aspects of brain information processing (the vector functional account), four hurdles to an understanding of the brain are identified and inspected: indeterminacy, micro-specificity, chaos, and openness.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jeff Foss (1991). On Saving the Phenomena and the Mice: A Reply to Bourgeois Concerning Van Fraassen's Image of Science. Philosophy of Science 58 (2):278-287.
    In the fusillade he lets fly against Foss (1984), Bourgeois (1987) sometimes hits a live target. I admit that I went beyond the letter of van Fraassen's The Scientific Image (1980), making inferences and drawing conclusions which are often absurd. I maintain, however, that the absurdities must be charged to van Fraassen's account. While I cannot redress every errant shot of Bourgeois, his essay reveals the need for further discussion of the concepts of the phenomena and the observables as used (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jeffrey Foss (1990). Paul M. Churchland, A Neurocomputational Perspective: The Nature of Mind and the Structure of Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (10):399-402.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeffrey E. Foss (1989). On the Logic of What It is Like to Be a Conscious Subject. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (June):305-320.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jeff Foss (1988). Hilary Putnam, Representation and Reality Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (12):491-494.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jeffrey E. Foss (1988). The Percept and Vector Function Theories of the Brain. Philosophy of Science 55 (December):511-537.
    Physicalism is an empirical theory of the mind and its place in nature. So the physicalist must show that current neuroscience does not falsify physicalism, but instead supports it. Current neuroscience shows that a nervous system is what I call a vector function system. I provide a brief outline of the resources that empirical research has made available within the constraints of the vector function approach. Then I argue that these resources are sufficient, indeed apt, for the physicalist enterprise, by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jeffrey E. Foss (1987). Is the Mind-Body Problem Empirical? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (September):505-32.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jeffrey Foss (1986). Abstract Solutions Versus Neurobiologically Plausible Problems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):95-96.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jeffrey Foss (1986). Nicholas Maxwell, From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution in the Aims and Methods of Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (5):235-237.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jeffrey Foss (1986). Perception and Cognition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):303-322.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jeff Foss (1985). Joseph Margolis, Culture and Cultural Entities Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (3):120-123.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jeff Foss (1985). Radical Behaviorism is a Dead End. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):59-59.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jeffrey E. Foss (1985). A Materialist's Misgivings About Eliminative Materialism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11:105-33.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jeff Foss (1984). On Accepting Van Fraassen's Image of Science. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):79-92.
    In his book, The Scientific Image, van Fraassen lucidly draws an alternative to scientific realism, which he calls "Constructive Empiricism". In this epistemological theory, the concept of observability plays the pivotal role: acceptable theories may be believed only where what they say solely concerns observables. Van Fraassen develops a concept of observability which is, as he admits, vague, relative, science-dependent, and anthropocentric. I draw out unacceptable consequences of each of these aspects of his concept. Also, I argue against his assumption (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jeff Foss (1984). Reflections on Peirce's Concepts of Testability and the Economy of Research. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:28 - 39.
    Peirce measures the testability of scientific hypotheses by these oft-repeated standards: "money, time, energy, thought". His concept of testability is outlined and developed. It is found to be strikingly different, but not incompatible with, the positivist-empiricist concept of testability- in-principle. Peirce's concept of testability is, however, much richer than the received positivist-empiricist concept, and plays a larger, more central role in the logic of science, as Peirce sees it. In particular, Peirce's concept, in its role in his theory of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Alex C. Michalos, Bruce A. Forster, Jeff Foss, John McMurtry & William D. Graf (1983). Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):157-168.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jeff Foss (1981). Richard M. Martin, Primordiality, Science and Value Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 1 (6):268-270.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeff Foss (1981). Scientific Progress. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (4):761-773.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jeffrey E. Foss (1981). C. I. Lewis and Dayton on Pragmatic Contradiction. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (2):153 - 157.
    Dayton's account of lewis' pragmatic contradiction seriously misconstrues this key concept by analyzing it in terms of logical contradiction. this order of analysis is explicitly rejected by lewis as the reverse of the proper order in which the pragmatic concept is foundational to logic and epistemology. i outline a correct account of pragmatic contradiction. then lewis' application of the idea to moral skepticism and the liar paradox is reconsidered, and is seen to vindicate his claim that both skeptic and liar (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jeffrey E. Foss (1980). Rethinking Self-Deception. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (July):237-242.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jeffrey Foss (1976). A Rule of Minimal Rationality: The Logical Link Between Beliefs and Values. Inquiry 19 (1-4):341 – 353.
    The object of this essay is to demonstrate a logical connection between beliefs and values. It is argued that such a connection can be established only if one keeps in mind the question: What is minimally required in order that it makes sense to speak of beliefs and values at all? Thus, the concept of minimal rationality is indispensable to the task at hand. A particular example of a logical connection between a belief and a value is examined, which leads (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation