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  1. Jeffrey Kirby (2014). Engaging With a Peer-Proposed, Additional Exploitation Condition: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Transnational Gestational Surrogacy: Does It Have to Be Exploitative?”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):W1 - W3.
  2. Jeffrey Kirby (2014). Transnational Gestational Surrogacy: Does It Have to Be Exploitative? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):24-32.
  3. Jeffrey Kirby (2012). Shifting the Emphasis to Meaningful Ethics Engagement in theDevelopmentof Health Policies. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):18-20.
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  4. Jeffrey Kirby & Christy Simpson (2012). Deliberative Engagement: An Inclusive Methodology for Exploring Professionalization. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (3):187-201.
    Early on in the development of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists Exploring Professionalization (PHEEP), the founding members recognized the need to address and meet two important goals: (1) the creation of a dynamic, rigorous process to support the exploratory work, and (2) the establishment of the means—deliberative engagement—to generate and justify the substantive content of professionalization-related products, such as practice standards and position statements. Drawing from social justice and deliberative democracy conceptions and insights (among others), the authors identify and describe the core (...)
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  5. Jeffrey Kirby (2011). Ethically Preferable Alternative Practice: “No”; A Preferable, Head-to-Head Analytical Approach: “Maybe”. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):57 - 59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 57-59, June 2011.
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  6. Jeffrey Kirby (2010). Accessing the Ethics of Complex Health Care Practices: Would a “Domains of Ethics Analysis” Approach Help? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (2):133-143.
    This paper explores how using a domains of ethics analysis approach might constructively contribute to an enhanced understanding (among those without specialized ethics training) of ethically-complex health care practices through the consideration of one such sample practice, i.e., deep and continuous palliative sedation (DCPS). For this purpose, I select four sample ethics domains (from a variety of possible relevant domains) for use in the consideration of this practice, i.e., autonomous choice, motives, actions and consequences. These particular domains were choosen because (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Kirby (2010). Enhancing the Fairness of Pandemic Critical Care Triage. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):758-761.
    Historically, the triage of temporarily scarce health resources has served narrow utilitarian ends. The recent H1N1 pandemic experience provided an opportunity for expanding the theoretical foundations/understandings of critical care triage in the context of declared infectious pandemics. This paper briefly explores the ethics-related challenges associated with the development of modern critical care triage protocols and provides descriptions of some ‘enhanced fairness’ features which were developed through the use of an inclusive deliberative engagement process by a Canadian provincial Department of Health.
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  8. Jeffrey Kirby (2009). Is Context a Distortional Factor, Really? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):20-21.
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  9. Jeffrey Conyers Kirby (2009). Organ Donation: Who Should Decide?—A Canadian Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):123-128.
    This paper examines an under-explored issue in organ donation: whose decision making authority should be privileged posthumously in the context of known, explicit consent for donation? Current practices in Canada support the family as the ultimate decision maker, despite the existence of legislative support in many Canadian provinces for the potential donor as legitimate decision maker. Arguments for and against privileging the family and the potential donor are identified. Informing the question of “who should decide” are considerations of individual and (...)
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  10. Jeff Kirby & Christy Simpson (2007). An Innovative, Inclusive Process for Meso-Level Health Policy Development. HEC Forum 19 (2):161-176.
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  11. Jeffrey C. Kirby (2004). Disability and Justice. Social Theory and Practice 30 (2):229-246.
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  12. Christy Simpson & Jeff Kirby (2004). Organizational Ethics and Social Justice in Practice: Choices and Challenges in a Rural-Urban Health Region. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 16 (4):274-283.
  13. Jeff Kirby (2003). A New Group-Selection Model for the Evolution of Homosexuality. Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):683-694.
    Abstract. Scientists have long puzzled over how homosexual orientation has evolved, given the assumed low relative fitness of homosexual individuals compared to heterosexual individuals. A number of theoretical models for the evolution of homosexuality have been postulated including balance polymorphism, "Fertile females", hypervariability of DNA sequences, kin selection, and "parental manipulation". In this paper, I propose a new group-selection model for the evolution of homosexuality which offers two advantages over existing models: (1) its non-assumption of genetic determinism, and (2) its (...)
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