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Profile: Jeff Malpas (University of Tasmania)
  1.  3
    Jeff Malpas (2006). Heidegger's Topology: Being, Place, World. A Bradford Book.
    This groundbreaking inquiry into the centrality of place in Martin Heidegger's thinking offers not only an illuminating reading of Heidegger's thought but a detailed investigation into the way in which the concept of place relates to core philosophical issues. In Heidegger's Topology, Jeff Malpas argues that an engagement with place, explicit in Heidegger's later work, informs Heidegger's thought as a whole. What guides Heidegger's thinking, Malpas writes, is a conception of philosophy's starting point: our finding ourselves already "there," situated in (...)
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  2.  16
    Steven Crowell & Jeff Malpas (eds.) (2007). Transcendental Heidegger. Stanford University Press.
    The thirteen essays in this volume represent the most sustained investigation, in any language, of the connections between Heidegger's thought and the tradition of transcendental philosophy inaugurated by Kant. This collection examines Heidegger's stand on central themes of transcendental philosophy: subjectivity, judgment, intentionality, truth, practice, and idealism. Several essays in the volume also explore hitherto hidden connections between Heidegger's later "post-metaphysical" thinking—where he develops a "topological" approach that draws as much upon poetry as upon the philosophical tradition—and the transcendental project (...)
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  3. Jeff Malpas, Davidson's Holism: Epistemology in the Mirror of Meaning.
    Foreword to the new edition Acknowledgements Introduction: radically interpreting Davidson I. From translation to interpretation 1. The Quinean background 1.1 Radical translation and naturalized epistemology 1.2 Meaning and indeterminacy 1.3 Analytical hypotheses and charity 2. The Davidsonian project 2.1 The development of a theory of meaning 2.2 The project of radical interpretation 2.3 From charity to triangulation..
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  4.  2
    Mark Wrathall & Jeff Malpas (eds.) (2000). Heidegger, Authenticity, and Modernity: Essays in Honor of Hubert L. Dreyfus. The MIT Press.
    For more than a quarter of a century, Hubert L. Dreyfus has been the leading voice in American philosophy for the continuing relevance of phenomenology, particularly as developed by Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Dreyfus has influenced a generation of students and a wide range of colleagues, and these volumes are an excellent representation of the extent and depth of that influence.In keeping with Dreyfus's openness to others' ideas, many of the essays in this volume take the form (...)
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  5. Philip Brey, Lee Caragata, James Dickinson, David Glidden, Sara Gottlieb, Bruce Hannon, Ian Howard, Jeff Malpas, Katya Mandoki, Jonathan Maskit, Bryan G. Norton, Roger Paden, David Roberts, Holmes Rolston Iii, Izhak Schnell, Jonathon M. Smith, David Wasserman & Mick Womersley (1998). Philosophy and Geography Iii: Philosophies of Place. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A growing literature testifies to the persistence of place as an incorrigible aspect of human experience, identity, and morality. Place is a common ground for thought and action, a community of experienced particulars that avoids solipsism and universalism. It draws us into the philosophy of the ordinary, into familiarity as a form of knowledge, into the wisdom of proximity. Each of these essays offers a philosophy of place, and reminds us that such philosophies ultimately decide how we make, use, and (...)
     
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  6.  6
    Jeff Malpas (2012). Heidegger and the Thinking of Place: Explorations in the Topology of Being. The MIT Press.
    The idea of place--topos--runs through Martin Heidegger's thinking almost from the very start. It can be seen not only in his attachment to the famous hut in Todtnauberg but in his constant deployment of topological terms and images and in the situated, "placed" character of his thought and of its major themes and motifs. Heidegger's work, argues Jeff Malpas, exemplifies the practice of "philosophical topology." In Heidegger and the Thinking of Place, Malpas examines the topological aspects of Heidegger's thought and (...)
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  7. Jeff Malpas & Norelle Lickiss (eds.) (forthcoming). Perspectives on Human Suffering. Springer.
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  8.  27
    Jeff Malpas (1997). The Transcendental Circle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (1):1 – 20.
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  9.  5
    Mark A. Wrathall & Jeff E. Malpas (eds.) (2000). Heidegger Coping and Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
    The essays in this volume reflect this desire to "make a difference"—not just in the world of academic philosophy, but in the broader world.
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  10. Mark Wrathall & Jeff Malpas (eds.) (2000). Heidegger, Coping, and Cognitive Science: Essays in Honor of Hubert L. Dreyfus, Volume 2. MIT Press.
     
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  11. Jeff Malpas (2005). Place and Experience: A Philosophical Topography. Cambridge University Press.
    While the 'sense of place' is a familiar theme in poetry and art, philosophers have generally given little or no attention to place and the human relation to place. In Place and Experience, Jeff Malpas seeks to remedy this by advancing an account of the nature and significance of place as a complex but unitary structure that encompasses self and other, space and time, subjectivity and objectivity. Drawing on a range of sources from Proust and Wordsworth to Davidson, Strawson and (...)
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  12.  8
    David Armstrong, Rae Langton, Robert Audi, Jerrold Levinson, John Bacon, David Lewis, Rick Benitez, Gary Malinas, John Biro & Jeff Malpas (1995). The Editor and the Associate Editors Thank the Consulting Editors, the Members of the Editorial Board and the Following Philosophers for Their Help with Refereeing Papers During the Period July 1994 to June 1995. Adeney, Douglas Kennett, Jeanette Agar, Nicholas Lamarque, Peter. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4).
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  13. Jeff Malpas (1999). Constituting the Mind: Kant, Davidson, and the Unity of Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (1):1-30.
    Both Kant and Davidson view the existence of mental states, and so the possibility of mental content, as dependent on the obtaining of a certain unity among such states. And the unity at issue seems also to be tied, in the case of both thinkers, to a form of self-reflexivity. No appeal to self-reflexivity, however, can be adequate to explain the unity of consciousness that is necessary for the possibility of content- it merely shifts the focus of the question from (...)
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  14. Jeff Malpas, 'Sprache Ist Gespräch': On Gadamer, Language and Philosophy.
    Gadamer was fond of telling of his last meeting with his old teacher Martin Heidegger: ‘You are right’, said Heidegger, ‘language is conversation [Sprache ist Gespräch].’1 We might argue as to what such a comment, assuming Gadamer remembered it aright, would really have meant for Heidegger – whether it would have constituted a significant revision of any view to which Heidegger was himself committed.2 The fact that Gadamer felt it worth repeating, however, does indicate something of Gadamer’s conception of the (...)
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  15.  82
    Jeff Malpas (2002). Review: The Self and its Other: Philosophical Essays. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):701-703.
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  16.  9
    Jeff Malpas, Donald Davidson. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17. Jeff Malpas, The Strangeness of Death.
    The life of Gautama, who came to be known as the Buddha, the Enlightened One, is famously said to have been irrevocably changed by his experience of three things: poverty, old age, and death – it was this experience that started him on the road to enlightenment. There is no doubt that the encounter with death can be a life-changing experience, perhaps more so than either poverty or old-age, and not only because death may be construed as an especially powerful (...)
     
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  18.  63
    Jeff Malpas (1997). Space and Sociality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (1):53 – 79.
    To what extent is our being as social creatures dependent on our having a grasp of sociality? Is a purely solipsistic space, a space that can be grasped without any grasp of the existence of others, possible? These questions are examined and the possible connection between space and sociality explored. The central claim is that there is indeed an intimate relation between the concept of space and the idea of the social: that any creature that has a grasp of the (...)
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  19.  46
    Jeff Malpas (2011). Truth, Narrative, and the Materiality of Memory: An Externalist Approach in the Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):328-353.
    One of the most influential and significant developments in the philosophy of language over the last thirty years has been the rise of externalist conceptions of content. This essay aims to explore the implications of a form of externalism, largely derived from the work of Donald Davidson, for thinking about history, and in so doing to suggest one way in which contemporary philosophy of language may engage with contemporary philosophy of history. Much of the discussion focuses on the (...)
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  20.  14
    Jeff Malpas (2003). Martin Heidegger. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 143--162.
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  21.  15
    Jeff Malpas (2003). On the Map: Comments on Stuart Elden's Mapping the Present: Heidegger, Foucault and the Project of a Spatial History. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):213 – 218.
  22.  32
    Jeff Malpas (2004). The Discomfort of Strangeness. The Philosophers' Magazine 27 (27):34-36.
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  23.  5
    Jeff Malpas (2005). The Dualities of Work. Philosophy Today 49 (3):256-263.
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  24.  30
    Jeff Malpas (2008). Truth, Lies, and Deceit. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):1-12.
    On the one hand, most of us would take honesty to be a key ethical virtue. Corporations and other organizations often include it in their codes of ethics, we legislate against various forms of dishonesty, we tend to be ashamed (or at least defensive) when we are caught not telling the truth, and honesty is often regarded as a key element in relationships. Yet on the other hand, dishonesty, that is, lying and deceit, seems to be commonplace in contemporary public (...)
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  25.  47
    Jeff Malpas (2004). Holism, Realism, and Truth: How to Be an Anti-Relativist and Not Give Up on Heidegger (or Davidson) - a Debate with Christopher Norris. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):339 – 356.
    Responding to criticisms raised by Christopher Norris, this paper defends an anti-relativist reading of the work of both Davidson and Heidegger arguing that that there are important lessons to be learnt from their example - one can thus be an anti-relativist (as well as a certain sort of realist) without giving up on Davidson or on Heidegger.
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  26.  48
    Jeff Malpas (1994). Self-Knowledge and Scepticism. Erkenntnis 40 (2):165-184.
    Donald Davidson has argued that 'most of our beliefs must be true' and that global scepticism is therefore false. Davidson's arguments to this conclusion often seem to depend on externalist considerations. Davidson's position has been criticised, however, on the grounds that he does not defeat the sceptic, but rather already assumes the falsity of scepticism through his appeal to externalism. Indeed, it has been claimed that far from defeating the sceptic Davidson introduces an even more extreme version of scepticism according (...)
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  27.  15
    Jeff Malpas (1999). The Fragility of Robust Realism: A Reply to Dreyfus and Spinosa. Inquiry 42 (1):89 – 101.
    Hubert Dreyfus and Charles Spinosa's argument for 'robust' realism centres on the possibility of our having access to things as they are in themselves and so as having access to things in a way that is not dependent on our 'quotidian concerns or sensory capacities'. Dreyfus and Spinosa claim that our everyday access to things is incapable of providing access of this kind, since our everyday access is holistically enmeshed with our everyday attitudes and concerns. The argument that Dreyfus and (...)
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  28. Jeff Malpas, At the Threshold: The Edge of Liminality.
    Every threshold is placed at an edge, and yet not merely an edge, for the threshold always carries with it a sense of opening up toward or closing away from. Only that place at the edge that anticipates or remembers can constitute a threshold. The threshold thus is not a place in which one can remain – to do so is for it to cease to be a threshold – but is always a place of movement and transition. Indeed, one (...)
     
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  29.  6
    Jeff Malpas (2003). Loptson, Peter. Reality: Fundamental Topics in Metaphysics. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):663-665.
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  30.  39
    Jeff Malpas, Disclosing the Depths of Heidegger's Topology: A Response to Relph.
    Ted Relph’s review of Heidegger’s Topology acknowledges the importance of Heidegger’s thought in the contemporary turn to place within the Humanities and Social Sciences, just as it acknowledges the importance of the philosophical inquiry into place as such (Relph is also particularly generous in his estimation of the role of my work, in Heidegger’s Topology and elsewhere, in contributing to this). Moreover, Relph provides a strikingly apt and vivid image of the way the concept of ‘place’ has, in recent years, (...)
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  31.  8
    Jeff Malpas (1994). A Taste of Madeleine. International Philosophical Quarterly 34 (4):433-451.
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  32.  27
    Frank Ankersmit & Jeff Malpas (2011). Why Does Language Matter to History (and History to Language)? Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):241-243.
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  33.  33
    Jeff Malpas, Heidegger in Benjamin's City.
    The commonplace image of Heidegger is of a philosopher firmly rooted, not in the city of Freiburg in which much of his life was spent, but in the Alemannic-Schwabian countryside around the village of Messkirch in which he was born. It would seem that the distance between Heidegger and Benjamin, between Messkirch and Berlin or Paris could not be greater. But to what extent are Heidegger's own personal predilections for the provincial and the bauerlich actually tied to the philosophical positions (...)
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  34.  33
    Jeff Malpas (2008). Heidegger, Geography, and Politics. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (2):185-213.
    It is often argued that there is a connection between certain forms of environmental or place-oriented thinking and conservative or reactionary politics. Frequently, the philosopher Martin Heidegger is taken to exemplify this connection through his own involvement with Nazism. In this essay, I explore the relations between Heidegger's thought and that of certain other key thinkers, principally the ethologist Jakob von Uexküll, and the geographers Friedrich Ratzel and Paul Vidal de la Blache, as well as with elements of Nazi ideology. (...)
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  35.  32
    Jeff Malpas (2008). On Not Giving Up the World - Davidson and the Grounds of Belief. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (2):201 – 215.
    What is the relation between our beliefs, or thoughts in general, and the perceptual experience of the world that gives rise to those beliefs? Donald Davidson is usually taken to have a well-known answer to this question that runs as follows: while our beliefs are, at least in part, caused by our experience, such experience does not thereby count as providing a rational ground for those beliefs; our beliefs are thus evidentially grounded in other beliefs, but not in the experience (...)
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  36.  31
    Jeff Malpas (1988). The Nature of Interpretative Charity. Dialectica 42 (1):17-36.
    SummaryIn Davidson's Theory of radical interpretation the principle of charity plays a crucial role. However the principle is the subject of widespread misunderstanding. The author attempts to provide an overall account of the principle and in doing so details some aspects of the holism which characterises the Davidsonian approach to interpretation. Charity is shown as inseparable from that holism. Two aspects of the principle are distinguished and some objections to the principle are also considered.
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  37.  21
    Jeff Malpas (2011). The Place of Topology: Responding to Crowell, Beistegui, and Young. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):295 - 315.
    The idea of philosophical topology, or topography as I call it outside of the Heideggerian context, has become increasingly central to my work over the last twenty years. While the idea is not indebted only to Heidegger’s thinking, it is probably Heidegger to whom I owe the most. Moreover, one of my claims, central to _Heidegger’s Topology_, is that Heidegger’s own work cannot adequately be understood except as topological in character, and so as centrally concerned with place – _topos, Ort, (...)
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  38.  7
    Jeff Malpas (2011). Philosophy's Nostalgia. In Hagi Kenaan & Ilit Ferber (eds.), Philosophy's Moods: The Affective Grounds of Thinking. Springer 87--101.
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  39.  7
    Jeff Malpas, The Weave of Meaning: Holism and Contextuality.
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  40. Jeff Malpas, Cultural Heritage in the Age of New Media.
    Walter Benjamin’s 1936 essay, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’, constitutes one of the earliest reflections on the way in which the cultural experience and interpretation is transformed by the advent of what were then the ‘new’ media technologies of photography and film. Benjamin directs attention to the way in which these technologies release cultural objects from their unique presence in a place and make them uniformly available irrespective of spatial location. The way in which old (...)
     
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  41.  26
    Jeff Malpas (2008). Finding the Space of Sense. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):155-158.
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  42. Jeff Malpas, Truth, Politics, and Democracy – Arendt, Orwell, and Camus.
    The venture into the public realm seems clear to me. One exposes oneself to the light of the public, as a person. Although I am of the opinion that one must not appear and act in public selfconsciously, still I know that in every action the person is expressed as in no other human activity. Speaking is also a form of action. That is one venture. The other is: we start something. We weave our strand into a network of relations. (...)
     
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  43.  25
    Jeff Malpas, The Forms of Water: In the Land and in the Soul.
    Water, its presence or absence, and the forms in which it appears, is fundamental to any and every place on earth. Indeed, along with soil, air and light, water is elemental to place, and so also to all life and dwelling in place. Moreover, human life is itself essentially determined through its entanglement in place and places, and so is constituted, if indirectly, perhaps, through water and its forms. The centrality of place that I am alluding to here arises out (...)
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  44.  14
    Jeff Malpas (1999). Locating Interpretation: The Topography of Understanding in Heidegger and Davidson. Philosophical Topics 27 (2):129-148.
  45.  13
    Jeff Malpas (1998). Unity, Locality and Agency. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):627-633.
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  46.  6
    Jeff Malpas, Wim Wenders : The Role of Memory.
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  47.  6
    Jeff Malpas, Place and Human Being.
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  48.  6
    Jeff Malpas & Linn Miller, Home and the Place of Memory.
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  49. Jeff Malpas, The Problem of Dependence in Being and Time.
    For anyone interested in the place of spatiality in Heidegger’s thinking, one of the key problems presented by Being and Time is Heidegger’s attempt, in §70, ‘to derive existential spatiality from temporality’1 – an attempt he himself referred to as ‘untenable’.2 This attempt turns out to not to be merely peripheral to Heidegger’s overall analysis, but is instead tied to certain central and problematic features in the argument of Being and Time, including its treatment of spatial and topographic concepts in (...)
     
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  50.  5
    Jeff E. Malpas (1991). Holism and Indeterminacy. Dialectica 47 (1):47-58.
    SummaryDonald Davidson's account of the interrelation between attitudes, and linguistic and non‐linguistic behaviour is a thoroughly holistic one. The project of radical interpretation itself embodies a holistic approach to the interpretative task. Yet Davidson also accepts a degree of indeterminacy in interpretation. Davidson's commitment to both holism and indeterminacy can give rise to a problem in the Davidsonian position. That problem is explained and a solution proposed. The indeterminacy thesis is thereby clarified, as is the nature of Davidsonian holism.
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