Search results for 'Jeff Vincent' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aviva Must, Gary Bennett, Christina Economos, Elizabeth Goodman, Joe Schilling, Lisa Quintiliani, Sara Rosenbaum, Jeff Vincent & Marice Ashe (2009). Improving Coordination of Legal-Based Efforts Across Jurisdictions and Sectors for Obesity Prevention and Control. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37:90-98.score: 240.0
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  2. Marice Ashe, Gary Bennett, Christina Economos, Elizabeth Goodman, Joe Schilling, Lisa Quintiliani, Sara Rosenbaum, Jeff Vincent & Aviva Must (2009). Assessing Coordination of Legal-Based Efforts Across Jurisdictions and Sectors for Obesity Prevention and Control. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37:45-54.score: 240.0
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  3. Andrew Vincent (2010). The Politics of Human Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Politics of Human Rights provides a systematic introductory overview of the nature and development of human rights. At the same time it offers an engaging argument about human rights and their relationship with politics. The author argues that human rights have only a slight relation to natural rights and they are historically novel: In large part they are a post-1945 reaction to genocide which is, in turn, linked directly to the lethal potentialities of the nation-state. He suggests that an (...)
     
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  4. Nicole A. Vincent (2010). On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):77-98.score: 30.0
    Various authors debate the question of whether neuroscience is relevant to criminal responsibility. However, a plethora of different techniques and technologies, each with their own abilities and drawbacks, lurks beneath the label “neuroscience”; and in criminal law responsibility is not a single, unitary and generic concept, but it is rather a syndrome of at least six different concepts. Consequently, there are at least six different responsibility questions that the criminal law asks – at least one for each responsibility concept – (...)
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  5. Nicole A. Vincent (2007). Responsibility, Compensation and Accident Law Reform. Dissertation, University of Adelaidescore: 30.0
    This thesis considers two allegations which conservatives often level at no-fault systems — namely, that responsibility is abnegated under no-fault systems, and that no-fault systems under- and over-compensate. I argue that although each of these allegations can be satisfactorily met – the responsibility allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that to properly take responsibility for our actions we must accept liability for those losses for which we are causally responsible; and the compensation allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that tort (...)
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  6. Nicole A. Vincent (2008). Book Review of "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" by Tsachi Keren-Paz. [REVIEW] Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 33:199-204.score: 30.0
    In "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" (Ashgate, 2007), Tsachi Keren-Paz presents impressingly detailed analysis that bolsters the case in favour of incremental tort law reform. However, although this book's greatest strength is the depth of analysis offered, at the same time supporters of radical law reform proposals may interpret the complexity of the solution that is offered (and its respective cost) as conclusive proof that tort law can only take adequate account of egalitarian aims at an unacceptably high cost.
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  7. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). What Do You Mean I Should Take Responsibility for My Own Ill Health? Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):39-51.score: 30.0
    Luck egalitarians think that considerations of responsibility can excuse departures from strict equality. However critics argue that allowing responsibility to play this role has objectionably harsh consequences. Luck egalitarians usually respond either by explaining why that harshness is not excessive, or by identifying allegedly legitimate exclusions from the default responsibility-tracking rule to tone down that harshness. And in response, critics respectively deny that this harshness is not excessive, or they argue that those exclusions would be ineffective or lacking in justification. (...)
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  8. Nicole A. Vincent (2006). Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery. Imprints 9 (2):118-39.score: 30.0
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
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  9. Nicole A. Vincent (2005). Compensation for Mere Exposure to Risk. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 29:89-101.score: 30.0
    It could be argued that tort law is failing, and arguably an example of this failure is the recent public liability and insurance (‘PL&I’) crisis. A number of solutions have been proposed, but ultimately the chosen solution should address whatever we take to be the cause of this failure. On one account, the PL&I crisis is a result of an unwarranted expansion of the scope of tort law. Proponents of this position sometimes argue that the duty of care owed by (...)
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  10. Andrew Vincent (2009). Patriotism and Human Rights: An Argument for Unpatriotic Patriotism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (4):347 - 364.score: 30.0
    This paper centres on the question as to whether human rights can be reconciled with patriotism. It lays out the more conventional arguments which perceive them as incommensurable concepts. A central aspect of this incommensurability relates to the close historical tie between patriotism and the state. One further dimension of this argument is then articulated, namely, the contention that patriotism is an explicitly political concept. The implicit antagonism between, on the one hand, the state, politics and patriotism, and, on the (...)
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  11. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). Responsibility: Distinguishing Virtue From Capacity. Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):111-26.score: 30.0
    Garrath Williams claims that truly responsible people must possess a “capacity … to respond [appropriately] to normative demands” (2008:462). However, there are people whom we would normally praise for their responsibility despite the fact that they do not yet possess such a capacity (e.g. consistently well-behaved young children), and others who have such capacity but who are still patently irresponsible (e.g. some badly-behaved adults). Thus, I argue that to qualify for the accolade “a responsible person” one need not possess such (...)
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  12. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments. Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49.score: 30.0
    Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.
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  13. Nicole A. Vincent (2001). What is at Stake in Taking Responsibility? Lessons From Third-Party Property Insurance. [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 20 (1):75-94.score: 30.0
    Third-party property insurance (TPPI) protects insured drivers who accidentally damage an expensive car from the threat of financial ruin. Perhaps more importantly though, TPPI also protects the victims whose losses might otherwise go uncompensated. Ought responsible drivers therefore take out TPPI? This paper begins by enumerating some reasons for why a rational person might believe that they have a moral obligation to take out TPPI. It will be argued that if what is at stake in taking responsibility is the ability (...)
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  14. Nicole A. Vincent (2008). Responsibility, Dysfunction and Capacity. Neuroethics 1 (3):199-204.score: 30.0
    The way in which we characterize the structural and functional differences between psychopath and normal brains – either as biological disorders or as mere biological differences – can influence our judgments about psychopaths’ responsibility for criminal misconduct. However, Marga Reimer (Neuroethics 1(2):14, 2008) points out that whether our characterization of these differences should be allowed to affect our judgments in this manner “is a difficult and important question that really needs to be addressed before policies regarding responsibility... can be implemented (...)
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  15. Andrew Vincent (2005). Nationalism and the Open Society. Theoria 44 (107):36-64.score: 30.0
    Nationalism has had a complex relation with the discipline of political theory during the 20th century. Political theory has often been deeply uneasy with nationalism in relation to its role in the events leading up to and during the Second World War. Many theorists saw nationalism as an overly narrow and potentially irrationalist doctrine. In essence it embodied a closed vision of the world. This article focuses on one key contributor to the immediate post-war debate—Karl Popper—who retained deep misgivings about (...)
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  16. Patrick Amar, Pascal Ballet, Georgia Barlovatz-Meimon, Arndt Benecke, Gilles Bernot, Yves Bouligand, Paul Bourguine, Franck Delaplace, Jean-Marc Delosme, Maurice Demarty, Itzhak Fishov, Jean Fourmentin-Guilbert, Joe Fralick, Jean-Louis Giavitto, Bernard Gleyse, Christophe Godin, Roberto Incitti, François Képès, Catherine Lange, Lois Le Sceller, Corinne Loutellier, Olivier Michel, Franck Molina, Chantal Monnier, René Natowicz, Vic Norris, Nicole Orange, Helene Pollard, Derek Raine, Camille Ripoll, Josette Rouviere-Yaniv, Milton Saier, Paul Soler, Pierre Tambourin, Michel Thellier, Philippe Tracqui, Dave Ussery, Jean-Claude Vincent, Jean-Pierre Vannier, Philippa Wiggins & Abdallah Zemirline (2002). Hyperstructures, Genome Analysis and I-Cells. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4).score: 30.0
    New concepts may prove necessary to profit from the avalanche of sequence data on the genome, transcriptome, proteome and interactome and to relate this information to cell physiology. Here, we focus on the concept of large activity-based structures, or hyperstructures, in which a variety of types of molecules are brought together to perform a function. We review the evidence for the existence of hyperstructures responsible for the initiation of DNA replication, the sequestration of newly replicated origins of replication, cell division (...)
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  17. Andrew W. Vincent (1989). Can Groups Be Persons? Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):687-715.score: 30.0
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  18. Charles Vincent & Jean Camp (2004). Looking to the Internet for Models of Governance. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (3):161-173.score: 30.0
    If code is law then standards bodies are governments. This flawed but powerful metaphor suggests the need to examine more closely those standards bodies that are defining standards for the Internet. In this paper we examine the International Telecommunications Union, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association, the Internet Engineering Task Force, and the World Wide Web Consortium. We compare the organizations on the basis of participation, transparency, authority, openness, security and interoperability. We conclude that the IETF and (...)
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  19. R. H. Vincent (1962). The Paradox of Ideal Evidence. Philosophical Review 71 (4):497-503.score: 30.0
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  20. Vern C. Vincent & Wig De Moville (1993). Ethical Considerations for Streaming Business Publications. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (1):37 - 43.score: 30.0
    This exploratory ethics study of a publication and presentation practice herein defined as streaming investigates the attitudes of deans of schools of business and business professors regarding such behavior. Streaming publications is the practice of presenting or publishing an article at one outlet and then taking the same article with perhaps minor revisions and presenting or publishing it at another publication outlet. The results of the survey suggest that the most important ethical behavior regarding streaming practices is disclosure. If authors (...)
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  21. Vida Carver & P. Vincent (1964). The British Society of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):135-135.score: 30.0
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  22. R. H. Vincent (1961). Goodman and Relevant Conditions. Philosophical Studies 12 (1-2):28 - 29.score: 30.0
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  23. R. H. Vincent (1962). Popper on Qualitative Confirmation and Disconfirmation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):159 – 166.score: 30.0
  24. Gilbert Vincent (2001). The Engagement of French Protestantism in Solidarism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (4):401-421.score: 30.0
    It is conventional to think of modernity as being characterised by the irremediable separation of philosophy and theology, of reason and faith. Failing to reconsider the idea of such a divorce, post-modernity has pushed this postulate to its very limits by attempting to abolish all types of normativity whether on the grounds of reason or any other basis. Against these prevailing conceptions, we argue that there exist, within philosophy and theology, processes of differentiation as well as original combinations. To illustrate (...)
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  25. R. H. Vincent (1964). The Problem of the Unexamined Individual. Mind 73 (292):550-556.score: 30.0
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  26. P. Vincent & Pat Statham (1967). British Society of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):307-307.score: 30.0
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  27. Louis-Marie Vincent (1993). Theory of Data Transferal. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2).score: 30.0
    A new approach to information is proposed with the intention of providing a conceptual tool adapted to biology, including a semantic value.Information involves a material support as well as a significance, adapted to the cognitive domain of the receiver and/or the transmitter. A message does not carry any information, only data. The receiver makes an identification by a procedure of recognition of the forms, which activate previously learned significance. This treatment leads to a new significance (or new knowledge).
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  28. D. H. Vincent (1964). The Paradoxes of Confirmation. Mind 73 (290):273-279.score: 30.0
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  29. Denis Noble, Jean Didier Vincent & György Ádám (eds.) (1997). The Ethics of Life. Unesco Pub..score: 30.0
     
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  30. John Russell Vincent (2006). An Intelligent Person's Guide to History. Duckworth Overlook.score: 30.0
  31. R. H. Vincent (1961). A Note on Some Quantitative Theories of Confirmation. Philosophical Studies 12 (6):91 - 92.score: 30.0
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  32. R. H. Vincent (1963). Concerning an Alleged Contradiction. Philosophy of Science 30 (2):189-194.score: 30.0
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  33. Theo Vincent (2004). Everyman I Will Go with Thee: The Highways of Literature. University of Lagos Press.score: 30.0
     
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  34. Alexander Vincent (1892/1993). Lex Mundi. F.B. Rothman.score: 30.0
     
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  35. Andrew Vincent (2006). Metaphysics and Ethics in the Philosophy of T.H. Green. In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  36. R. H. Vincent (1963). On My Cognitive Sensibility. Philosophical Studies 14 (5):77 - 79.score: 30.0
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  37. Andrew Vincent (1984). Philosophy, Politics, and Citizenship: The Life and Thought of the British Idealists. B. Blackwell.score: 30.0
     
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  38. Louis-Marie Vincent (1994). Reflexions Sur l'Usage, En Biologie, de la Theorie de L'Information. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3).score: 30.0
    For living beings, information is as fundamental as matter or energy. In this paper we show: a) inadequacies of quantitative theories of information, b) how a qualitative analysis leads to a classification of information systems and to a modelling of intercellular communication.From a quantitative point of view, the application in biology of information theories borrowed from communication techniques proved to be disappointing. These theories ignore deliberately the significance of messages, and do not give any definition of information. They refer to (...)
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  39. Hyung Wook Park (2008). Edmund Vincent Cowdry and the Making of Gerontology as a Multidisciplinary Scientific Field in the United States. Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):529 - 572.score: 24.0
    The Canadian-American biologist Edmund Vincent Cowdry played an important role in the birth and development of the science of aging, gerontology. In particular, he contributed to the growth of gerontology as a multidisciplinary scientific field in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s. With the support of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation, he organized the first scientific conference on aging at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where scientists from various fields gathered to discuss aging as a scientific research topic. He (...)
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  40. Julie Adkins, Kathleen Arnold, Kurt Borchard, David Cook, Jeff Ferrell, Vincent Lyon-Callo, Jürgen von Mahs, Don Mitchell, Rob Rosenthal, Michael Rowe, Lynn A. Staeheli & J. Talmadge Wright (2012). Professional Lives, Personal Struggles: Ethics and Advocacy in Research on Homelessness. Lexington Books.score: 24.0
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  41. E. R. Hilgard & A. A. Campbell (1937). Vincent Curves of Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (3):310.score: 21.0
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  42. Ludovic Frobert (2011). Théorie cellulaire, science économique et République dans l'œuvre de François-Vincent Raspail autour de 1830. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 1:27-58.score: 21.0
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  43. Volker Dieringer (2009). Is a Jamesian Wager the Only Safe Bet? On Jeff Jordan's New Book on Pascal's Wager. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 91 (2):237-247.score: 18.0
    In his new book on Pascal's Wager, Jeff Jordan argues that only the ‘Jamesian’ version of the wager argument, as he sees it presented in William James' essay The Will to Believe , constitutes a sound pragmatic argument in favour of theism, whereas Pascal's original wager argument is doomed to fail on various grounds. This article argues that Jordan's theory is untenable. The many-gods objection is used as an example: it is demonstrated that the Jamesian Wager argument too is (...)
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  44. Re'em Segev (2007). Lesser Evil and Responsibility: Comments on Jeff McMahan's Analysis of the Morality of War. Israel Law Review 40 (3):709-729.score: 18.0
    The main aim of Jeff McMahan's manuscript on the morality of war is to answer the question: why and accordingly when is it justified or permissible to kill people in war? However, McMahan argues that the same principles apply to individual actions and to war. McMahan rejects all doctrines of collective responsibility and liability. His claim is that every individual is liable for what he has done and not for the actions of others - even if both are part (...)
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  45. Patrick Allo (2008). Vincent Hendricks, Mainstream and Formal Epistemology. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 69 (3):427-432.score: 18.0
    As Vincent Hendricks remarks early on in this book, the formal and mainstream traditions of epistemic theorising have mostly evolved independently of each other. This initial impression is confirmed by a comparison of the main problems and methods practitioners in each tradition are concerned with. Mainstream epistemol- ogy engages in a dialectical game of proposing and challenging definitions of knowledge. Formal epistemologists proceed differently, as they design a wide variety of axiomatic and model-theoretic methods whose consequences they investigate independently (...)
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  46. Christopher Norris (2004). Reply to Jeff Malpas: On Truth, Realism, Changing One's Mind About Davidson (Not Heidegger), and Related Topics. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):357 – 374.score: 18.0
    This essay responds to Jeff Malpas's foregoing article, itself written in response to my various publications over the past two decades concerning Donald Davidson's ideas about truth, meaning, and interpretation. It has to do mainly with our disagreement as regards the substantive content of Davidson's truth-based semantic approach in relation to the problematic legacy of logical empiricism, including Quine's incisive but no less problematical critique of that legacy. I also raise questions with respect to Malpas's coupling of Davidson with (...)
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  47. Mikael Stenmark (1998). The End of the Theism–Atheism Debate? A Response to Vincent Brümmer. Religious Studies 34 (3):261-280.score: 18.0
    Vincent Brümmer has recently, by taking his starting-point in the writings of Wittgenstein, defended the idea that the debate about the truth or falsehood of the claim that God exists has no future. I suggest that the arguments Brümmer develops to support this claim fail. This is so because he does not show why any attempt to prove or disprove the truth or falsehood of the belief in the existence of God is circular or how the purported non-provability of (...)
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  48. John C. Bowes (1998). St. Vincent de Paul and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (15):1663-1667.score: 18.0
    St. Vincent de Paul (1581–1660) is well known for his contribution to charitable and social works. Even though he left no detailed examination of his business practices, by examining his life and his commitment to the poor, it is possible to frame a Vincentian theology of business ethics. Such an understanding would include educating students in the social teaching of the Catholic Church, a preferential option for the poor, good organization, sound business theory, economizing, and a foundation in the (...)
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  49. Ross Parker (2013). Deep and Wide: A Response to Jeff Jordan on Divine Love. Faith and Philosophy 30 (4):444-461.score: 18.0
    Recently Jeff Jordan has argued against the view that divine perfection would require God to love every human with equal maximal intensity. He asserts that his argument depends on principles of perfect being theology which he develops and defends. In this paper I argue that Jordan’s case can be better understood as two conceptually distinct arguments, only one of which depends on his proffered principles of perfect being theology. I then critically evaluate each of these arguments, arguing that both (...)
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  50. Jeff Mcmahan (2010). 20 Cognitive Disability and Cognitive Enhancement Jeff McMahan. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 345.score: 18.0
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