Search results for 'Jeffery Oakley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  53
    Michael J. Shaffer & Jeffery Oakley (2005). Some Epistemological Concerns About Dissociative Identity Disorder and Diagnostic Practices in Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):1-29.
    In this paper we argue that dissociative identity disorder (DID) is best interpreted as a causal model of a (possible) post-traumatic psychological process, as a mechanical model of an abnormal psychological condition. From this perspective we examine and criticize the evidential status of DID, and we demonstrate that there is really no good reason to believe that anyone has ever suffered from DID so understood. This is so because the proponents of DID violate basic methodological principles of good causal modeling. (...)
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  2.  50
    Justin Oakley (2001). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  3. Renée Jeffery (2016). Reason and Emotion in International Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The study of international ethics is marked by an overwhelming bias towards reasoned reflection at the expense of emotionally driven moral deliberation. For rationalist cosmopolitans in particular, reason alone provides the means by which we can arrive at the truly impartial moral judgments a cosmopolitan ethic demands. However, are the emotions as irrational, selfish and partial as most rationalist cosmopolitans would have us believe? By re-examining the central claims of the eighteenth-century moral sentiment theorists in light of cutting-edge discoveries in (...)
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  4. Francis Oakley (2010). Empty Bottles of Gentilism: Kingship and the Divine in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Yale University Press.
    In this book—the first volume in his groundbreaking trilogy on the emergence of western political thought—Francis Oakley explores the roots of secular political thinking by examining the political ideology and institutions of Hellenistic and late Roman antiquity and of the early European middle ages. By challenging the popular belief that the ancient Greek and Roman worlds provided the origins of our inherently secular politics, Oakley revises our understanding of the history of political theory in a fundamental and far-reaching (...)
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  5. Francis Oakley (2015). The Watershed of Modern Politics: Law, Virtue, Kingship, and Consent. Yale University Press.
    The concluding volume of Francis Oakley's authoritative trilogy moves on to engage the political thinkers of the later Middle Ages, Renaissance, Age of Reformation and religious wars, and the era that produced the Divine Right Theory of Kingship. Oakley's ground-breaking study probes the continuities and discontinuities between medieval and early modern modes of political thinking and dwells at length on the roots and nature of those contract theories that sought to legitimate political authority by grounding it in the (...)
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  6. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2005). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  7. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2009). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  8. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2006). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous (...)
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  9. David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan (2009). Hypnotic Suggestion and Cognitive Neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):264-270.
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  10.  18
    David A. Oakley (ed.) (1985). Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  11. N. W. Oakley (2007). Jubilee Manifesto: A Framework, Agenda and Strategy for Christian Social Reform. Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (1):154-156.
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  12. Patrick Haggard, P. Catledge, M. Dafydd & David A. Oakley (2004). Anomalous Control: When "Free Will" is Not Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):646-654.
    The conscious feeling of exercising ‘free-will’ is fundamental to our sense of self. However, in some psychopathological conditions actions may be experienced as involuntary or unwilled. We have used suggestion in hypnosis to create the experience of involuntariness in normal participants. We compared a voluntary finger movement, a passive movement and a voluntary movement suggested by hypnosis to be ‘involuntary.’ Hypnosis itself had no effect on the subjective experience of voluntariness associated with willed movements and passive movements or on time (...)
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  13. Judith G. Oakley (2000). Gender-Based Barriers to Senior Management Positions: Understanding the Scarcity of Female CEOs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (4):321 - 334.
    Although the number of women in middle management has grown quite rapidly in the last two decades, the number of female CEOs in large corporations remains extremely low. This article examines many explanations for why women have not risen to the top, including lack of line experience, inadequate career opportunities, gender differences in linguistic styles and socialization, gender-based stereotypes, the old boy network at the top, and tokenism. Alternative explanations are also presented and analyzed, such as differences between female leadership (...)
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  14. Andrew V. Jeffery (1994). MA Corey, God and the New Cosmology: The Anthropic Design Argument Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):246-248.
     
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  15.  5
    Justin Oakley, Practitioner Courage and Ethical Health Care Environments.
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  16.  66
    Justin Oakley (1992). Morality and the Emotions. Routledge.
    Introduction In recent years there has been a welcome reawakening of philosophical interest in the emotions. A significant number of contemporary ...
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  17.  9
    Tim Oakley (forthcoming). How to Release Oneself From an Obligation: Good News for Duties to Oneself. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    ABSTRACTIn some cases, you may release someone from some obligation they have to you. For instance, you may release them from a promise they made to you, or an obligation to repay money they have borrowed from you. But most take it as clear that, if you have an obligation to someone else, you cannot in any way release yourself from that obligation. I shall argue the contrary. The issue is important because one standard problem for the idea of having (...)
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  18.  1
    Gillian Rhodes, Stephen Pond, Nichola Burton, Nadine Kloth, Linda Jeffery, Jason Bell, Louise Ewing, Andrew J. Calder & Romina Palermo (2015). How Distinct is the Coding of Face Identity and Expression? Evidence for Some Common Dimensions in Face Space. Cognition 142:123-137.
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  19.  12
    Justin Oakley, A Virtue Ethics Analysis of Disclosure Requirements and Financial Incentives as Responses to Conflicts of Interest in Physician Prescribing.
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  20.  67
    Justin Oakley (1996). Varieties of Virtue Ethics. Ratio 9 (2):128-152.
  21. Ann Oakley (2000). Experiments in Knowing: Gender and Method in the Social Sciences. New Press.
  22. N. Oakley (2004). Book Review: Choosing the Good: Christian Ethics in a Complex World. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (3):65-67.
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  23. N. W. Oakley (2007). Short Review: Andreas Csepregi, Two Ways to Freedom: Christianity and Democracy in the Thought of Istvan Bibo and Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Budapest: Acta Theologica Lutherana Budapestinensia Il., 2003), 255 Pp. ISBN 963 210 760. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (2):315-316.
  24.  1
    Patricia L. Smith & I. I. I. Oakley (1997). Gender-Related Differences in Ethical and Social Values of Business Students: Implications for Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):37-45.
    This study investigated gender-related differences in ethical attitudes of 318 graduate and undergraduate business students. Significant differences were observed in male and female responses to questions concerning ethics in social and personal relationships. No differences were noted for survey items concerning rules-based obligations. Implications for future management are discussed.
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  25.  17
    Justin Oakley, Shame, Virtue, and Right Action.
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  26. Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley (1995). Indirect Consequentialism, Friendship, and the Problem of Alienation. Ethics 106 (1):86-111.
    In this article we argue that the worries about whether a consequentialist agent will be alienated from those who are special to her go deeper than has so far been appreciated. Rather than pointing to a problem with the consequentialist agent's motives or purposes, we argue that the problem facing a consequentialist agent in the case of friendship concerns the nature of the psychological disposition which such an agent would have and how this kind of disposition sits with those which (...)
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  27.  11
    David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan (2011). Using Hypnosis to Gain Insights Into Healthy and Pathological Cognitive Functioning. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):328-331.
    The demonstration that hypnotic suggestion can inhibit word/colour Stroop highlights one of the benefits of using hypnosis to explore cognitive psychology and in particular attentional processes. The compelling results using a rigorous design have particular relevance for the presumed automaticity of some forms of information processing. Moreover the results support the potential that hypnotic suggestion offers for creating clinically informed analogues of relevant psychological and neuropsychological conditions. As with all novel research, the results of Raz and Campbell raise further operational (...)
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  28.  29
    I. T. Oakley (2001). A Skeptic's Reply to Lewisian Contextualism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):309-332.
    In his justifiedly famous paper, “Elusive Knowledge” (Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 74:4, 1996), David Lewis presents a contextualist account of knowledge, which, like other contextualist accounts, depicts sceptical claims as involving application of a higher standard of knowledge than is applied in everyday ascriptions of knowledge. On Lewis’ account, the sceptic’s denials and the everyday ascriptions are made in different contexts, which allows them both to be true. His account gives detailed specification of how contexts are to be determined. My (...)
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  29.  40
    Kathryn J. Jeffery, Aleksandar Jovalekic, Madeleine Verriotis & Robin Hayman (forthcoming). Navigating in a 3D World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
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  30.  5
    Linda Jeffery, Ainsley Read & Gillian Rhodes (2013). Four Year-Olds Use Norm-Based Coding for Face Identity. Cognition 127 (2):258-263.
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  31.  34
    Francis Oakley (2005). Natural Law, Laws of Nature, Natural Rights: Continuity and Discontinuity in the History of Ideas. Continuum.
    Metaphysical schemata and intellectual traditions -- Laws of nature : the scientific concept -- Natural law : disputed moments of transition -- Natural rights : origins and grounding.
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  32.  4
    Justin Oakley (2016). Diagnosing True Virtue? Remote Scenarios, Warranted Virtue Attributions, and Virtuous Medical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):85-96.
    Immanuel Kant argues in the Foundations that remote scenarios are diagnostic of genuine virtue. When agents commonly thought to have a particular virtue fail to exhibit that virtue in an extreme situation, he argues, they do not truly have the virtue at all, and our propensities to fail in such ways indicate that true virtue might never have existed. Kant’s suggestion that failure to show, say, courage in extraordinary circumstances necessarily silences one’s claim to have genuine courage seems to rely (...)
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  33. J. Oakley (2015). Good Medical Ethics, From the Inside Out--And Back Again. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):48-51.
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  34.  21
    Gillian Rhodes, Rachel Robbins, Emma Jaquet, Elinor McKone, Linda Jeffery & Colin Wg Clifford (2005). Adaptation and Face Perception: How Aftereffects Implicate Norm-Based Coding of Faces. In Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.), Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. OUP Oxford
  35.  1
    Iustin Oakley (2013). 9 Virtue Ethics and Bioethics. In Daniel C. Russell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Virtue Ethics. Cambridge University Press 197.
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  36.  11
    Paul Biegler, Jeanette Kennett, Justin Oakley & Patrick Vargas, Ethics of Implicit Persuasion in Pharmaceutical Advertising.
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  37.  14
    Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.) (2011). Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press.
    Pathological Altruism presents a number of new, thought-provoking theses that explore a range of hurtful effects of altruism and empathy.
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  38.  5
    Justin Oakley (2014). Virtue Ethics and Utilitarianism. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd.
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  39.  13
    Jeanne M. Serb & Todd H. Oakley (2005). Hierarchical Phylogenetics as a Quantitative Analytical Framework for Evolutionary Developmental Biology. Bioessays 27 (11):1158-1166.
  40.  11
    Justin Oakley, Response to Commentaries: Sketch of a Virtue Ethics Regulatory Model.
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  41.  46
    I. T. Oakley (1976). An Argument for Scepticism Concerning Justified Beliefs. American Philosophical Quarterly 13 (3):221 - 228.
    This paper argues for a completely universal scepticism, according to which no beliefs at all are justified to the least degree. The argument starts with a version of the Agrippan trilemma, according to which, if we accept that a belief is justified, we must choose between foundationalism, coherentism of a particular sort, and an infinite regress of justified beliefs. Each of these theories is given a careful specification in terms of the relationship of “justifiedness in p depending on justifiedness in (...)
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  42.  13
    Kathryn J. Jeffery & Neil Burgess (2006). A Metric for the Cognitive Map: Found at Last? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-3.
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  43.  17
    Diana D. Jeffery & Janet Fries (2011). Unauthorized Uses of a Coauthored Work and a Doctoral Dissertation. Ethics and Behavior 21 (2):118-126.
    This article describes the unauthorized uses of a coauthored work and a copyrighted U.S. dissertation by European scientists. The case involves alleged infringements of copyright and plagiarism in 6 works that were published up to 19 years after completion of the dissertation and up to 11 years after publication of the coauthored work. Relevant copyright laws, international copyright agreements, and professional psychology ethics and definitions of scientific misconduct are presented. Graduate students and professionals are advised to protect themselves from copyright (...)
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  44.  14
    I. T. Oakley (1988). Scepticism and the Diversity of Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Quarterly 38 (152):263-279.
    Sceptics have been accused of achieving their sceptical conclusions by an arbitrary (though usually implicit) redefinition of terms like “justified”, so that, while it may be true that no belief is justified in the sceptic’s new sense of the word, all the beliefs we have taken as justified remain so in the ordinary, standard meaning of the term. This paper defends scepticism against this charge. It is pointed out that there are several sorts of case where someone’s belief may be (...)
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  45. David A. Oakley (1985). Animal Awareness, Consciousness, and Self-Image. In Brain and Mind. Methuen
     
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  46.  14
    Andrew V. Jeffery (1998). Experience of God and the Rationality of Theistic Belief. Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):149-150.
  47.  9
    Kathryn J. Jeffery, Aleksandar Jovalekic, Madeleine Verriotis & Robin Hayman (2013). Navigating in a Three-Dimensional World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):523-543.
    The study of spatial cognition has provided considerable insight into how animals (including humans) navigate on the horizontal plane. However, the real world is three-dimensional, having a complex topography including both horizontal and vertical features, which presents additional challenges for representation and navigation. The present article reviews the emerging behavioral and neurobiological literature on spatial cognition in non-horizontal environments. We suggest that three-dimensional spaces are represented in a quasi-planar fashion, with space in the plane of locomotion being computed separately and (...)
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  48.  1
    E. Walsh, M. A. Mehta, D. A. Oakley, D. N. Guilmette, A. Gabay, P. W. Halligan & Q. Deeley (2014). Using Suggestion to Model Different Types of Automatic Writing. Consciousness and Cognition 26:24-36.
    Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as “automatic writing” whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed suggestion in highly hypnotically suggestible participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional suggestion, was associated with a small but significant (...)
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  49.  1
    Steven Vaughan & Emma Oakley (2016). ‘Gorilla Exceptions’ and the Ethically Apathetic Corporate Lawyer. Legal Ethics 19 (1):50-75.
    ABSTRACTThis paper draws on interviews with 57 corporate finance lawyers working from global law firms based in the City of London. Drawing on this data, we highlight common themes of taking deals at ‘face value’, being the lawyer-technician who uses the law to effect his client’s wishes, and not ‘pushing’ ethics. We suggest that there is an apathy – a lack of concern or interest – about ethics on the part of corporate lawyers. This apathy stems from various sources. It (...)
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  50.  1
    A. Einstein, G. B. Jeffery & W. Perrett (1925). Sidelights on Relativity. Philosophical Review 34 (2):204-205.
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