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Jeffrey A. Bernstein [20]Jeffrey Alan Bernstein [1]
  1. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2014). New Directions in the Thought of Leo Strauss. Idealistic Studies 44 (2):139-147.
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  2. Jeffrey A. Bernstein & Claire E. Katz (2014). Ready When You Are: A Correspondence on Claire Elise Katz's Levinas and the Crisis of Humanism. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):123-136.
    A Conversation with Claire Katz about her book, Levinas and the Crisis of Humanism.
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  3. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2013). Thoughts on the Two Translations of Heidegger's Beiträge. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):295 - 306.
  4. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2013). The Weimar Moment: Liberalism, Political Theology, and Law. Edited by Leonard V. Kaplan and Rudy Koshar. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012. [REVIEW] Constellations 20 (3):508-509.
  5. Jeffrey A. Bernstein, Maura Jane Farrelly, Robert Faulkner, Matthew Holbreich, Jonathan Israel, Peter McNamara, Carla Mulford, Vincent Philip Muñoz, Danilo Petranovich, Eran Shalev & Aristide Tessitore (2013). Resistance to Tyrants, Obedience to God: Reason, Religion, and Republicanism at the American Founding. Lexington Books.
    This volume, with contributions from scholars in political science, literature, and philosophy, examines the mutual influence of reason and religion at the time of the American Founding.
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  6. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohns Theological-Political Thought, Michah Gottlieb, Oxford University Press, 2011. 209 Pp. Cl. ISBN: 978-0-19-539894. [REVIEW] International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (2):224-226.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  7. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Is History New? Recent Modernist Interpretations of Hegel. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):283-298.
    This review explores a recent trend in commentary on Hegel’s philosophy of history which owes much of its interpretive substance to the aesthetic modernism of the Frankfurt School. This modernist trend emphasizes the interplay of form and content, material conditions of rationality, and the temporal disjunction between experiencing and cognizing history. In so doing, it produces a deeply political, psychoanalytic, and musical reading of Hegel.
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  8. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). The Paradoxical Transmission of Tradition and Agamben's Potential Reading of the Rishonim. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (2):225-242.
    This essay explores the significance of Agamben’s sparse references to medieval Jewish thinkers (that is, the Rishonim) and raises the question as to whether the modern interpretive horizon of “history” is adequate for providing an understanding of these thinkers.
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  9. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Viewing the Premises, Review Of: Richard L. Velkley. Heidegger, Strauss, and the Premises of Philosophy: On Original Forgetting. Research in Phenomenology 42 (3):467-477.
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  10. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Child's Play. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):49-64.
    This article explores the influence of Winnicott’s conceptual constellation of early childhood, play, use, transitional phenomena, and transitional object upon Agamben’s thinking of contemporary historical exigency.
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  11. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Giorgio Agamben. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16:49-64.
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  12. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Nietzsche, Psychology, and First Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):127-128.
    The first four chapters of Pippin's elegant volume on Nietzsche were originally delivered as a series of lectures at the Collège de France in 2004. In a certain respect, the context of these lectures defines the parameters of Pippin's reading of Nietzsche: he advocates an interpretation very close to Bernard Williams in emphasizing the psychological aspects and motifs of Nietzsche's thought over and against certain contemporary French appropriations . In over-emphasizing the deconstructive capacity of Nietzsche's text, Pippin holds, these interpretations (...)
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  13. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses: Spinoza and Freud on the Traumatic Legacy of Theological-Political Identity. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  14. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  15. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Editor's Note. Idealistic Studies 38 (1-2):1-1.
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  16. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2005). On the Interval Between Negative and Positive Philosophy in Schelling's Thought. Review of the Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time by Jason M. Wirth. Research in Phenomenology 35 (1):343-350.
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  17. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1999). Balibar, Etienne. Spinoza and Politics. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):426-428.
  18. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1996). The Relevance of Philosophy to Life. Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):167-168.
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