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  1. Jeffrey B. Wagman (2010). What is Responsible for the Emergence of Order and Pattern in Psychological Systems? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 30 (1):32-50.
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  2. Jeffrey B. Wagman (2008). Perception-Action as Reciprocal, Continuous, and Prospective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):219-220.
    From the perspective of ecological psychology, perception and action are not separate, linear, and mechanistic processes that refer to the immediate present. Rather, they are reciprocal and continuous and refer to the impending future. Therefore, from the perspective of ecological psychology, delays in perception and action are impossible, and delay compensation mechanisms are unnecessary.
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  3. Jeffrey B. Wagman & Claudia Carello (2003). Haptically Creating Affordances: The User-Tool Interface. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 9 (3):175.
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  4. Jeffrey B. Wagman (2002). Symmetry for the Sake of Symmetry, or Symmetry for the Sake of Behavior? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):423-424.
    Wynn suggests that the imposition of symmetry on stone tools is indicative of the evolutionary development of cognitive abilities of the tool makers, particularly that of creating mental images. I suggest that it is more likely indicative of the evolutionary development of the perceptual ability to detect resources for behavior of hand-held objects.
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  5. Robert E. Shaw & Jeffrey B. Wagman (2001). Explanatory Burdens and Natural Law: Invoking a Field Description of Perception-Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):905-906.
    Although we agree with Hommel et al. that perception and action refer to one another, we disagree that they do so via a code. Gibson (1966; 1979) attempted to frame perception-action as a field phenomenon rather than as a particle phenomenon. From such a perspective, perception and action are adjoint, mutually interacting through an information field, and codes are unnecessary.
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