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Jeffrey A. Bernstein [19]Jeffrey Bernstein [10]
  1. Jeffrey A. Bernstein & Claire E. Katz (2014). Ready When You Are: A Correspondence on Claire Elise Katz's Levinas and the Crisis of Humanism. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):123-136.
    A Conversation with Claire Katz about her book, Levinas and the Crisis of Humanism .
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  2. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2013). Thoughts on the Two Translations of Heidegger's Beiträge. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):295 - 306.
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  3. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2013). The Weimar Moment: Liberalism, Political Theology, and Law. Edited by Leonard V. Kaplan and Rudy Koshar. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012. [REVIEW] Constellations 20 (3):508-509.
  4. Jeffrey A. Bernstein, Maura Jane Farrelly, Robert Faulkner, Matthew Holbreich, Jonathan Israel, Peter McNamara, Carla Mulford, Vincent Philip Muñoz, Danilo Petranovich, Eran Shalev & Aristide Tessitore (2013). Resistance to Tyrants, Obedience to God: Reason, Religion, and Republicanism at the American Founding. Lexington Books.
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  5. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohns Theological-Political Thought, Michah Gottlieb, Oxford University Press, 2011. 209 Pp. Cl. ISBN: 978-0-19-539894. [REVIEW] International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (2):224-226.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  6. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Is History New? Recent Modernist Interpretations of Hegel. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):283-298.
  7. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). The Paradoxical Transmission of Tradition and Agamben's Potential Reading of the Rishonim. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (2):225-242.
    This essay explores the significance of Agamben’s sparse references to medieval Jewish thinkers (that is, the Rishonim) and raises the question as to whether the modern interpretive horizon of “history” is adequate for providing an understanding of these thinkers.
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  8. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2012). Viewing the Premises, Review Of: Richard L. Velkley. Heidegger, Strauss, and the Premises of Philosophy: On Original Forgetting. Research in Phenomenology 42 (3):467-477.
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  9. Jeffrey Bernstein (2011). Peter Sloterdijk: Rage and Time: A Psychopolitical Investigation. Mario Wenning (Trans.). [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (2):253-257.
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  10. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Child's Play. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):49-64.
    This article explores the influence of Winnicott’s conceptual constellation of early childhood, play, use, transitional phenomena, and transitional object upon Agamben’s thinking of contemporary historical exigency.
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  11. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Giorgio Agamben. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16:49-64.
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  12. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2011). Nietzsche, Psychology, and First Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):127-128.
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  13. Jeffrey Bernstein (2010). From Tragedy to Iconoclasm. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):139-163.
    This paper explores the transformation which Adorno’s conception of history undergoes from his texts of the 1930s to those of the 1960s. This transformation involves a change in the role played by Hölderlin’s figure of transience. In the texts of the ’30s, Hölderlinian transience (in its Benjaminian interpretation) amounts to a moment of negative content within Adorno’s conception of history. In the texts of the ’60s, such transience becomes the very form of Adornian philosophical history. As such, his thinking of (...)
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  14. Jeffrey Bernstein (2008). Creation History: The Creation of the World, or Globalization. Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):122-128.
  15. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses: Spinoza and Freud on the Traumatic Legacy of Theological-Political Identity. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  16. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  17. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Editor's Note. Idealistic Studies 38 (1-2):1-1.
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  18. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2005). On the Interval Between Negative and Positive Philosophy in Schelling's Thought. Review of the Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time by Jason M. Wirth. Research in Phenomenology 35 (1):343-350.
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  19. Jeffrey Bernstein (2004). Dialectics of Enlightenment. Idealistic Studies 34 (2):131-150.
    This article explores the recent reception of the German Idealist tradition within the English-speaking philosophical world. Texts by four authors—Fredrick Beiser, Richard Velkley, Dennis Schmidt, and Gregg Horowitz—are examined as to their respective participation in what I call a materialist appropriation of German Idealism. In this article, I explore (1) what the term ‘materialism’ means in this context and (2) the reasons for such a new interpretation. I hold that this interpretation is utilized as a response to the Enlightenment priority (...)
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  20. Jeffrey Bernstein (2004). Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, simultaneously, a dialectical (...)
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  21. Jeffrey Bernstein (2003). Returns of the Repressed. Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):115-120.
    This introduction provides the context for the succeeding papers in this volume. After raising the question as to why Spinoza's philosophy attracts such extreme-and extremely diverse-attention and interpretation, I suggest that there is a "repressed" element to his thought which becomes manifest when one perceives the diversity of Spinoza-interpretations in a relational manner. I refer to this repressed element of Spinoza's thought as "the materiality of nature." I claim that the articles in this volume, all of which contain important insights (...)
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  22. Jeffrey Bernstein (2001). Francis Bacon. Teaching Philosophy 24 (2):188-191.
  23. Jeffrey Bernstein (2000). The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy, 1637-1739. Teaching Philosophy 23 (4):381-384.
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  24. Jeffrey Bernstein (2000). The Irreducibility of the Ontic. Idealistic Studies 30 (2):91-105.
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  25. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1999). Balibar, Etienne. Spinoza and Politics. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):426-428.
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  26. Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  27. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (1996). The Relevance of Philosophy to Life. Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):167-168.
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