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Profile: Jeffrey Bub (University of Maryland, College Park)
  1. Jeffrey Bub (forthcoming). Quantum Computation From a Quantum Logical Perspective. .
     
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  2. Allen Stairs & Jeffrey Bub (2013). Correlations, Contextuality and Quantum Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (3):483-499.
    Quantum theory is a probabilistic theory that embodies notoriously striking correlations, stronger than any that classical theories allow but not as strong as those of hypothetical ‘super-quantum’ theories. This raises the question ‘Why the quantum?’—whether there is a handful of principles that account for the character of quantum probability. We ask what quantum-logical notions correspond to this investigation. This project isn’t meant to compete with the many beautiful results that information-theoretic approaches have yielded but rather aims to complement that work.
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  3. Jeffrey Bub (2012). Why the Tsirelson Bound?. In. In Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.), Probability in Physics. Springer. 167--185.
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  4. William Demopoulos, Melanie Frappier & Jeffrey Bub (2012). Poincaré's “Les conceptions nouvelles de la matière”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (4):221-225.
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  5. Jeffrey Bub (2011). Quantum Probabilities: An Information-Theoretic Interpretation. In Claus Beisbart & Stephan Hartmann (eds.), Probabilities in Physics. Oxford University Press. 231.
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  6. Jeffrey Bub (2010). Quantum Computation: Where Does the Speed-Up Come From? In Alisa Bokulich & Gregg Jaeger (eds.), Philosophy of Quantum Information and Entanglement. Cambridge University Press. 231--246.
  7. Jeffrey Bub (2010). Von Neumann's 'No Hidden Variables' Proof: A Re-Appraisal. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1333-1340.
    Since the analysis by John Bell in 1965, the consensus in the literature is that von Neumann’s ‘no hidden variables’ proof fails to exclude any significant class of hidden variables. Bell raised the question whether it could be shown that any hidden variable theory would have to be nonlocal, and in this sense ‘like Bohm’s theory.’ His seminal result provides a positive answer to the question. I argue that Bell’s analysis misconstrues von Neumann’s argument. What von Neumann proved was the (...)
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  8. Jeffrey Bub & Williams Demopoulos (2010). Itamar Pitowsky 1950–2010. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (2):85-.
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  9. Jeffrey Bub & Itamar Pitowsky (2010). Two Dogmas About Quantum Mechanics. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.
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  10. Jeffrey Bub & Allen Stairs (2009). Contextuality and Nonlocality in 'No Signaling' Theories. Foundations of Physics 39 (7):690-711.
    We define a family of ‘no signaling’ bipartite boxes with arbitrary inputs and binary outputs, and with a range of marginal probabilities. The defining correlations are motivated by the Klyachko version of the Kochen-Specker theorem, so we call these boxes Kochen-Specker-Klyachko boxes or, briefly, KS-boxes. The marginals cover a variety of cases, from those that can be simulated classically to the superquantum correlations that saturate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality, when the KS-box is a generalized PR-box (hence a vertex of the ‘no (...)
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  11. Jeffrey Bub (2008). Quantum Computation and Pseudotelepathic Games. Philosophy of Science 75 (4):458-472.
    A quantum algorithm succeeds not because the superposition principle allows ‘the computation of all values of a function at once’ via ‘quantum parallelism’, but rather because the structure of a quantum state space allows new sorts of correlations associated with entanglement, with new possibilities for information‐processing transformations between correlations, that are not possible in a classical state space. I illustrate this with an elementary example of a problem for which a quantum algorithm is more efficient than any classical algorithm. I (...)
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  12. Jeffrey Bub, Quantum Entanglement and Information. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  13. Jeffrey Bub (2007). Quantum Probabilities as Degrees of Belief. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (2):232-254.
  14. Allen Stairs & Jeffrey Bub (2007). On Local Realism and Commutativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (4):863-878.
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  15. Allen Stairs & Jeffrey Bub (2006). Local Realism and Conditional Probability. Foundations of Physics 36 (4):585-601.
    Emilio Santos has argued (Santos, Studies in History and Philosophy of Physics http: //arxiv-org/abs/quant-ph/0410193) that to date, no experiment has provided a loophole-free refutation of Bell’s inequalities. He believes that this provides strong evidence for the principle of local realism, and argues that we should reject this principle only if we have extremely strong evidence. However, recent work by Malley and Fine (Non-commuting observables and local realism, http: //arxiv-org/abs/quant-ph/0505016) appears to suggest that experiments refuting Bell’s inequalities could at most confirm (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Bub (2005). Quantum Mechanics is About Quantum Information. Foundations of Physics 35 (4):541-560.
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  17. Jeffrey Bub (2004). Why the Quantum? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):241-266.
  18. Jeffrey Bub (2003). Indeterminacy and Enlanglemenl: The Challenge of Quantum. In Peter Clark & Katherine Hawley (eds.), Philosophy of Science Today. Oxford University Press. 236.
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  19. Jeffrey Bub (2003). 94 Obituary. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (1).
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  20. Jeffrey Bub & Christopher A. Fuchs (2003). Introduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (3):339-341.
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  21. Rob Clifton, Jeffrey Bub & Hans Halvorson (2003). Characterizing Quantum Theory in Terms of Information-Theoretic Constraints. Foundations of Physics 33 (11):1561-1591.
    We show that three fundamental information-theoretic constraints -- the impossibility of superluminal information transfer between two physical systems by performing measurements on one of them, the impossibility of broadcasting the information contained in an unknown physical state, and the impossibility of unconditionally secure bit commitment -- suffice to entail that the observables and state space of a physical theory are quantum-mechanical. We demonstrate the converse derivation in part, and consider the implications of alternative answers to a remaining open question about (...)
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  22. Jeffrey Bub (2001). Maxwell's Demon and the Thermodynamics of Computation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):569-579.
    It is generally accepted, following Landauer and Bennett, that the process of measurement involves no minimum entropy cost, but the erasure of information in resetting the memory register of a computer to zero requires dissipating heat into the environment. This thesis has been challenged recently in a two-part article by Earman and Norton. I review some relevant observations in the thermodynamics of computation and argue that Earman and Norton are mistaken: there is in principle no entropy cost to the acquisition (...)
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  23. Jeffrey Bub, Secure Key Distribution Via Pre- and Post-Selected Quantum States.
    A quantum key distribution scheme whose security depends on the features of pre- and post-selected quantum states is described.
     
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  24. Jeffrey Bub (2001). The Quantum Bit Commitment Theorem. Foundations of Physics 31 (5):735-756.
    Unconditionally secure two-party bit commitment based solely on the principles of quantum mechanics (without exploiting special relativistic signalling constraints, or principles of general relativity or thermodynamics) has been shown to be impossible, but the claim is repeatedly challenged. The quantum bit commitment theorem is reviewed here and the central conceptual point, that an “Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen” attack or cheating strategy can always be applied, is clarified. The question of whether following such a cheating strategy can ever be disadvantageous to the cheater is (...)
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  25. Jeffrey Bub & Laura Ruetsche (1998). Reviews-Interpreting the Quantum World. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (4):637-641.
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  26. Jeffrey Bub (1996). Schütte's Tautology and the Kochen-Specker Theorem. Foundations of Physics 26 (6):787-806.
    I present a new 33-ray proof of the Kochen and Specker “no-go” hidden variable theorem in ℋ3, based on a classical tautology that corresponds to a contingent quantum proposition in ℋ3 proposed by Kurt Schütte in an unpublished letter to Specker in 1965. 1 discuss the relation of this proof to a 31-ray proof by Conway and Kochen, and to a 33-ray proof by Peres.
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  27. Jeffrey Bub (1995). Interference, Noncommutativity, and Determinateness in Quantum Mechanics. Topoi 14 (1):39-43.
    I consider to what extent the phenomenon of interference precludes the possibility of attributing simultaneously determinate values to noncommuting observables, and I show that, while all observables can in principle be taken as simultaneously determinate, it suffices to take a suitable privileged observable as determinate to solve the measurement problem.
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  28. Jeffrey Bub (1994). How to Interpret Quantum Mechanics. Erkenntnis 41 (2):253 - 273.
    I formulate the interpretation problem of quantum mechanics as the problem of identifying all possible maximal sublattices of quantum propositions that can be taken as simultaneously determinate, subject to certain constraints that allow the representation of quantum probabilities as measures over truth possibilities in the standard sense, and the representation of measurements in terms of the linear dynamics of the theory. The solution to this problem yields a modal interpretation that I show to be a generalized version of Bohm's hidden (...)
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  29. Jeffrey Bub (1994). Is Cognitive Neuropsychology Possible? Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 1:417-427.
    The aim of cognitive neuropsychology is to articulate the functional architecture underlying normal cognition, on the basis of cognitive performance data involving brain-damaged subjects. Glymour (forthcoming) formulates a discovery problem for cognitive neuropsychology, in the sense of formal learning theory, concerning the existence of a reliable methodology, and argues that the problem is insoluble: granted certain apparently plausible assumptions about the form of neuropsychological theories and the nature of the available evidence, a reliable methodology does not exist! I argue for (...)
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  30. Jeffrey Bub (1994). On the Structure of Quantal Proposition Systems. Foundations of Physics 24 (9):1261-1279.
    I define sublaltices of quantum propositions that can be taken as having determinate (but perhaps unknown) truth values for a given quantum state, in the sense that sufficiently many two-valued maps satisfying a Boolean homomorphism condition exist on each determinate sublattice to generate a Kolmogorov probability space for the probabilities defined by the slate. I show that these sublattices are maximal, subject to certain constraints, from which it follows easily that they are unique. I discuss the relevance of this result (...)
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  31. Jeffrey Bub (1994). Testing Models of Cognition Through the Analysis of Brain-Damaged Patients. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (3):837-55.
    The aim of cognitive neuropsychology is to articulate the functional architecture underlying normal cognition, on the basis of congnitive performance data involving brain-damaged subjects. Throughout the history of the subject, questions have been raised as to whether the methods of neuropsychology are adequate to its goals. The question has been reopened by Glymour [1994], who formulates a discovery problem for cognitive neuropsychology, in the sense of formal learning theory, concerning the existence of a reliable methodology. It appears that the discovery (...)
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  32. Jeffrey Bub (1992). Quantum Mechanics Without the Projection Postulate. Foundations of Physics 22 (5):737-754.
    I show that the quantum state ω can be interpreted as defining a probability measure on a subalgebra of the algebra of projection operators that is not fixed (as in classical statistical mechanics) but changes with ω and appropriate boundary conditions, hence with the dynamics of the theory. This subalgebra, while not embeddable into a Boolean algebra, will always admit two-valued homomorphisms, which correspond to the different possible ways in which a set of “determinate” quantities (selected by ω and the (...)
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  33. Alan Hájek & Jeffrey Bub (1992). Epr. Foundations of Physics 22 (3):313-332.
    We present an exegesis of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument for the incompleteness of quantum mechanics, and defend it against the critique in Fine. (1) We contend,contra Fine, that it compares favorably with an argument reconstructed by him from a letter by Einstein to Schrödinger; and also with one given by Einstein in a letter to Popper. All three arguments turn on a dubious assumption of “separability,” which accords separate elements of reality to space-like separated systems. We discuss how this assumption figures (...)
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  34. Jeffrey Bub (1991). Measurement and “Beables” in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 21 (1):25-42.
    It is argued that the measurement problem reduces to the problem of modeling quasi-classical systems in a modified quantum mechanics with superselection rules. A measurement theorem is proved, demonstrating, on the basis of a principle for selecting the quantities of a system that are determinate (i.e., have values) in a given state, that after a suitable interaction between a systemS and a quasi-classical systemM, essentially only the quantity measured in the interaction and the indicator quantity ofM are determinate. The theorem (...)
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  35. Jeffrey Bub (1991). The Problem of Properties in Quantum Mechanics. Topoi 10 (1):27-34.
    The properties of classical and quantum systems are characterized by different algebraic structures. We know that the properties of a quantum mechanical system form a partial Boolean algebra not embeddable into a Boolean algebra, and so cannot all be co-determinate. We also know that maximal Boolean subalgebras of properties can be (separately) co-determinate. Are there larger subsets of properties that can be co-determinate without contradiction? Following an analysis of Bohrs response to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen objection to the complementarity interpretation of quantum (...)
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  36. Jeffrey Bub (1990). Incompleteness, Nonlocality, and Realism. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):140-141.
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  37. Jeffrey Bub (1990). On Bohr's Response to EPR: II. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 20 (8):929-941.
    In my reconstruction of Bohr's reply to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument, I pointed out that Bohr showed explicitly, within the framework of the complementarity interpretation, how a locally maximal measurement on a subsystem S2 of a composite system S1+S2, consisting of two spatially separated subsystems, can make determinate both a locally maximal Boolean subalgebra for S2 and a locally maximal Boolean subalgebra for S1. As it stands, this response is open to an objection. In this note, I show that meeting the (...)
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  38. Jeffrey Bub (1990). Book Review:Niels Bohr's Philosophy of Physics Dugald Murdoch. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 57 (2):344-.
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  39. Jeffrey Bub (1989). On Bohr's Response to EPR: A Quantum Logical Analysis. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (7):793-805.
    Bohr's complementarity interpretation is represented as the relativization of the quantum mechanical description of a system to the maximal Boolean subalgebra (in the non-Boolean logical structure of the system) selected by a classically described experimental arrangement. Only propositions in this subalgebra have determinate truth values. The concept of a minimal revision of a Boolean subalgebra by a measurement is defined, and it is shown that the nonmaximal measurement of spin on one subsystem in the spin version of the Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen experiment (...)
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  40. Jeffrey Bub (1989). Review: The Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (2):191 - 211.
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  41. Jeffrey Bub (1988). From Micro to Macro: A Solution to the Measurement Problem of Quantum Mechanics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:134 - 144.
    Philosophical debate on the measurement problem of quantum mechanics has, for the most part, been confined to the non-relativistic version of the theory. Quantizing quantum field theory, or making quantum mechanics relativistic, yields a conceptual framework capable of dealing with the creation and annihilation of an indefinite number of particles in interaction with fields, i.e. quantum systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom. I show that a solution to the standard measurement problem is available if we exploit the (...)
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  42. Jeffrey Bub (1988). How to Solve the Measurement Problem of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 18 (7):701-722.
    A solution to the measurement problem of quantum mechanics is proposed within the framework of an intepretation according to which only quantum systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom have determinate properties, i.e., determinate values for (some) observables of the theory. The important feature of the infinite case is the existence of many inequivalent irreducible Hilbert space representations of the algebra of observables, which leads, in effect, to a restriction on the superposition principle, and hence the possibility of (...)
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  43. Jeffrey Bub (1985). Nancy Cartwright, How The Laws of Physics Lie Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (3):104-107.
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  44. Jeffrey Bub & Itamar Pitowsky (1985). Postscript to the Logic of Scientific Discovery. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):539-552.
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  45. Jeffrey Bub (1983). Book Review:Physics and Philosophy: Selected Essays Henry Margenau. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 50 (3):515-.
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  46. Jeffrey Bub (1982). Quantum Logic, Conditional Probability, and Interference. Philosophy of Science 49 (3):402-421.
    Friedman and Putnam have argued (Friedman and Putnam 1978) that the quantum logical interpretation of quantum mechanics gives us an explanation of interference that the Copenhagen interpretation cannot supply without invoking an additional ad hoc principle, the projection postulate. I show that it is possible to define a notion of equivalence of experimental arrangements relative to a pure state φ , or (correspondingly) equivalence of Boolean subalgebras in the partial Boolean algebra of projection operators of a system, which plays a (...)
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  47. Jeffrey Bub (1982). Book Review:Readings From the New Book on Nature--Physics and Metaphysics in the Modern Novel Robert Nadeau. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (3):480-.
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  48. Jeffrey Bub (1981). Hidden Variables and Quantum Logic — a Sceptical Review. Erkenntnis 16 (2):275 - 293.
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  49. Jeffrey Bub (1980). Book Review:Quantum Logic Peter Mittelstaedt. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 47 (2):332-.
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