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  1. Paul E. Smaldino & Jeffrey C. Schank (2012). Human Mate Choice is a Complex System. Complexity 17 (5):11-22.
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  2. Paul E. Smaldino & Jeffrey C. Schank (2012). Invariants of Human Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):164-164.
    Because of the complexity of human emotional responses, invariants must be sought not in the responses themselves, but in their generating mechanisms. Lindquist et al. show that functional locationism is a theoretical dead end; their proposed mechanistic framework is a first step toward better models of emotional behavior. We caution, however, that emotions may still be quasi-natural perceptual types.
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  3. William Bechtel, Werner Callebaut, James R. Griesemer & Jeffrey C. Schank (2006). Bill Wimsatt on Multiple Ways of Getting at the Complexity of Nature. Biological Theory 1 (2):213-219.
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  4. Christopher J. May, Jeffrey C. Schank, Sanjay Joshi, Jonathan Tran, R. J. Taylor & I.-Esha Scott (2006). Rat Pups and Random Robots Generate Similar Self-Organized and Intentional Behavior. Complexity 12 (1):53-66.
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  5. Jeffrey C. Schank (2006). Do Human Menstrual-Cycle Pheromones Exist? Human Nature 17 (4):448-470.
    Research over the past 15 years indicates, contrary to earlier results, that women do not synchronize their menstrual cycles. If women do not synchronize their cycles, this implies there is no mechanism for synchronizing cycles. Since a pheromone mechanism of synchronization is the only plausible mechanism that has been proposed, it follows that that there are no pheromones that modulate the length of menstrual cycles. To test this hypothesis, eight studies were reviewed that reported pheromone effects on menstrual cycles, other (...)
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  6. Zhengwei Yang & Jeffrey C. Schank (2006). Women Do Not Synchronize Their Menstrual Cycles. Human Nature 17 (4):433-447.
    It is widely believed that women who live together or who are close friends synchronize their menstrual cycles. We reexamined this phenomenon in two ways. First, we collected data on menstrual cycles from 186 Chinese women living in dorms for over a year. We found that women living in groups did not synchronize their cycles. Second, we reviewed the first study reporting menstrual synchrony. We found that group synchrony in that study was at the level of chance. We then show (...)
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  7. Jeffrey C. Schank (2002). Where Are All the Genes? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):527-528.
    Andrews et al. argue for adaptationism in cognitive research. However, the problem of evolvability brings into question the number of genes required for the evolution of cognitive mechanisms. Are there enough? Also, greater consideration should be given to alternative vicarious selection processes, which may produce cognitive mechanisms. Finally, identifying constraints with optimality arguments is more difficult than the authors think.
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  8. Jeffrey C. Schank (2001). Beyond Reductionism: Refocusing on the Individual with Individual‐Based Modeling. Complexity 6 (3):33-40.
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  9. Jeffrey C. Schank (2001). Dimensions of Modelling: Generality and Integrativeness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1075-1076.
    Webb has articulated a clear, multi-dimensional framework for discussing simulation models and modelling strategies. This framework will likely co-evolve with modelling. As such, it will be important to continue to clarify these dimensions and perhaps add to them. I discuss the dimension of generality and suggest that a dimension of integrativeness may also be needed.
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  10. Jeffrey C. Schank & William C. Wimsatt (1986). Generative Entrenchment and Evolution. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:33 - 60.
    The generative entrenchment of an entity is a measure of how much of the generated structure or activity of a complex system depends upon the presence or activity of that entity. It is argued that entities with higher degrees of generative entrenchment are more conservative in evolutionary changes of such systems. A variety of models of complex structures incorporating the effects of generative entrenchment are presented and we demonstrate their relevance in analyzing and explaining a variety of developmental and evolutionary (...)
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