Search results for 'Jeffrey Cain' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Jeffrey Cain (2009). After Utopia: Three Post-Personal Subjects Consider the Possibilities William E. Connolly (2008) Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann (2007) Philosophy of Exaggeration, Trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr (2008) Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (2):138-143.
    William E. Connolly Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann Philosophy of Exaggeration, trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
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  2. Jeffrey Cain (2001). Ultimate Meaning in the Poetry of Edmund Spenser. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 24 (2):88-105.
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  3.  5
    Bill Cain (1992). Bill Cain on the Conference. Clr James Journal 3 (1):7-16.
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  4.  1
    David W. Cain (1972). Artistic Contrivance and Religious Communication: DAVID W. CAIN. Religious Studies 8 (1):29-44.
    Remarks to the effect that a correct answer depends upon a correct question —that from a misleading question there can result only a misleading answer—are common today. In fact, one might suspect that such common concentration on finding the right questions has something to do with what seems to be an uncommon lack of answers. This concentration on the importance of asking the right questions can be applied to the interpretation of biblical literature. For here, certainly, the questions asked are (...)
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  5.  10
    Rudolf Carnap & Richard C. Jeffrey (1972). Book Review:Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability Rudolf Carnap, Richard C. Jeffrey. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 39 (4):549-.
  6. Domenico Costantini, Maria Carla Galavotti & Richard C. Jeffrey (1997). Probability, Dynamics, and Causality Essays in Honour of Richard C. Jeffrey.
     
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  7.  14
    Richard C. Jeffrey (2004). Formal Logic: Its Scope and Limits. Hackett Pub..
    This brief paperback is designed for symbolic/formal logic courses. It features the tree method proof system developed by Jeffrey. The new edition contains many more examples and exercises and is reorganized for greater accessibility.
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  8. Richard C. Jeffrey (1992). Probability and the Art of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Jeffrey is beyond dispute one of the most distinguished and influential philosophers working in the field of decision theory and the theory of knowledge. His work is distinctive in showing the interplay of epistemological concerns with probability and utility theory. Not only has he made use of standard probabilistic and decision theoretic tools to clarify concepts of evidential support and informed choice, he has also proposed significant modifications of the standard Bayesian position in order that it (...)
     
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  9.  57
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1974). Preference Among Preferences. Journal of Philosophy 71 (13):377-391.
  10.  17
    Lindley Darden & Joseph A. Cain (1989). Selection Type Theories. Philosophy of Science 56 (1):106-129.
    Selection type theories solve adaptation problems. Natural selection, clonal selection for antibody production, and selective theories of higher brain function are examples. An abstract characterization of typical selection processes is generated by analyzing and extending previous work on the nature of natural selection. Once constructed, this abstraction provides a useful tool for analyzing the nature of other selection theories and may be of use in new instances of theory construction. This suggests the potential fruitfulness of research to find other theory (...)
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  11. James Cain (2004). Free Will and the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies 40 (4):437-456.
    According to the free-will defence, the exercise of free will by creatures is of such value that God is willing to allow the existence of evil which comes from the misuse of free will. A well-known objection holds that the exercise of free will is compatible with determinism and thus, if God exists, God could have predetermined exactly how the will would be exercised; God could even have predetermined that free will would be exercised sinlessly. Thus, it is held, the (...)
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  12.  54
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1956). Valuation and Acceptance of Scientific Hypotheses. Philosophy of Science 23 (3):237-246.
  13. James Cain (2002). On the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 38 (3):355-362.
    There is a conception of hell that holds that God punishes some people in a way that brings about endless suffering and unhappiness. An objection to this view holds that such punishment could not be just since it punishes finite sins with infinite suffering. In answer to this objection, it is shown that endless suffering, even intense suffering, is consistent with the suffering being finite. Another objection holds that such punishment is contrary to God's love. A possible response to this (...)
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  14. M. J. Cain (2002). Fodor: Language, Mind, and Philosophy. Polity Press.
    Jerry Fodor is one of the most important philosophers of mind in recent decades. He has done much to set the agenda in this field and has had a significant influence on the development of cognitive science. Fodor's project is that of constructing a physicalist vindication of folk psychology and so paving the way for the development of a scientifically respectable intentional psychology. The centrepiece of his engagement in this project is a theory of the cognitive mind, namely, the computational (...)
     
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  15. Richard Jeffrey (2002). Logicism Lite. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):474-496.
    Logicism Lite counts number‐theoretical laws as logical for the same sort of reason for which physical laws are counted as as empirical: because of the character of the data they are responsible to. In the case of number theory these are the data verifying or falsifying the simplest equations, which Logicism Lite counts as true or false depending on the logical validity or invalidity of first‐order argument forms in which no numbertheoretical notation appears.
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  16. Richard C. Jeffrey (1966). Goodman's Query. Journal of Philosophy 63 (11):281-288.
  17. Gideon Sjoberg, Elizabeth A. Gill & Leonard D. Cain (2003). Countersystem Analysis and the Construction of Alternative Futures. Sociological Theory 21 (3):210-235.
    This essay explicates the role of countersystem analysis as an essential mode of social inquiry. In the process, particular attention is given to the place of negation and the future. One underlying theme is the asymmetry between the negative and the positive features of social activities, the negative being more readily identifiable empirically than the positive. A corollary theme, building on the observations of George Herbert Mead, is: one engages the present through experience; one engages the future through ideas. Furthermore, (...)
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  18.  29
    Richard Jeffrey (1987). Indefinite Probability Judgment: A Reply to Levi. Philosophy of Science 54 (4):586-591.
    Isaac Levi and I have different views of probability and decision making. Here, without addressing the merits, I will try to answer some questions recently asked by Levi (1985) about what my view is, and how it relates to his.
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  19.  18
    H. L. I. Bornett, J. H. Guy & P. J. Cain (2003). Impact of Animal Welfare on Costs and Viability of Pig Production in the UK. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (2):163-186.
    The European Union welfare standardsfor intensively kept pigs have steadilyincreased over the past few years and areproposed to continue in the future. It isimportant that the cost implications of thesechanges in welfare standards are assessed. Theaim of this study was to determine theprofitability of rearing pigs in a range ofhousing systems with different standards forpig welfare. Models were constructed tocalculate the cost of pig rearing (6–95 kg) in afully-slatted system (fulfilling minimum EUspace requirements, Directive 91630/EEC); apartly-slatted system; a high-welfare,straw-based system (...)
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  20.  74
    James Cain (1995). Infinite Utility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):401 – 404.
    Suppose we wish to decide which of a pair of actions has better consequences in a case in which both actions result in infinite utility. Peter Vallentyne and others have proposed that one action has better consequences than a second if there is a time after which the cumulative utility of the first action always outstrips the cumulative utility of the second. I argue against this principle, in particular I show how cases may arise in which up to any point (...)
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  21.  19
    Richard Jeffrey (1992). Radical Probabilism (Prospectus for a User's Manual). Philosophical Issues 2:193-204.
  22.  71
    James Cain & Zlatan Damnjanovic (1991). On the Weak Kleene Scheme in Kripke's Theory of Truth. Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (4):1452-1468.
    It is well known that the following features hold of AR + T under the strong Kleene scheme, regardless of the way the language is Gödel numbered: 1. There exist sentences that are neither paradoxical nor grounded. 2. There are 2ℵ0 fixed points. 3. In the minimal fixed point the weakly definable sets (i.e., sets definable as {n∣ A(n) is true in the minimal fixed point where A(x) is a formula of AR + T) are precisely the Π1 1 sets. (...)
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  23.  90
    M. J. Cain (2006). Concept Nativism and the Rule Following Considerations. Acta Analytica 21 (38):77-101.
    In this paper I argue that the most prominent and familiar features of Wittgenstein’s rule following considerations generate a powerful argument for the thesis that most of our concepts are innate, an argument that echoes a Chomskyan poverty of the stimulus argument. This argument has a significance over and above what it tells us about Wittgenstein’s implicit commitments. For, it puts considerable pressure on widely held contemporary views of concept learning, such as the view that we learn concepts by constructing (...)
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  24.  77
    M. J. Cain (2004). Review: Representation and Behavior. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (451):555-559.
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  25.  42
    M. J. Cain (2004). The Return of the Nativist. Philosophical Explorations 7 (1):1-20.
    Radical Concept Nativism (RCN) is the doctrine that most of our concepts are innate. In this paper I will argue in favour of RCN by developing a speculative account of concept acquisition that has considerable nativist credentials and can be defended against the most familiar anti-nativist objections. The core idea is that we have a whole battery of hard-wired dispositions that determine how we group together objects with which we interact. In having these dispositions we are effectively committed to an (...)
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  26.  45
    Bruce E. Cain & W. T. Jones (1979). Modes of Rationality and Irrationality. Philosophical Studies 36 (November):333-343.
  27.  25
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1971). On Interpersonal Utility Theory. Journal of Philosophy 68 (20):647-656.
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  28.  34
    Donald A. Saucier & Mary E. Cain (2006). The Foundations of Attitudes About Animal Research. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):117 – 133.
    Much controversy has surrounded the use of animals in research. Empirically, much of the research has focused on how ethical individuals believe animal research to be, but it has not systematically examined the specific beliefs or reasons why individuals do or do not believe animal research to be ethical. Study 1 investigated the thematic foundations for the decision that animal research is or is not ethical by examining the content of essays written by participants explaining why they do or do (...)
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  29.  34
    M. J. Cain (1999). Fodor's Attempt to Naturalize Mental Content. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (197):520-26.
  30.  18
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1965). Ethics and the Logic of Decision. Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):528-539.
  31.  27
    M. J. Cain (2000). Individualism, Twin Scenarios and Visual Content. Philosophical Psychology 13 (4):441-463.
    In this paper I address an important question concerning the nature of visual content: are the contents of human visual states and experiences exhaustively fixed or determined (in the non-causal sense) by our intrinsic physical properties? The individualist answers this question affirmatively. I will argue that such an answer is mistaken. A common anti-individualist or externalist tactic is to attempt to construct a twin scenario involving humanoid duplicates who are embedded in environments that diverge in such a way that it (...)
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  32.  23
    James Cain (1991). Are Analytic Statements Necessarily a Priori? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (3):334 – 337.
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  33.  19
    Richard Jeffrey (1993). Take Back the Day! Jon Dorling's Bayesian Solution of the Duhem Problem. Philosophical Issues 3:197-207.
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  34.  14
    James Cain (2005). Fred Berthold, Jr God, Evil, and Human Learning: A Critique and Revision of the Free Will Defense in Theodicy. (Albany NY: State University of New York Press, 2004). Pp. VIII+108. $32.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 7914 6041 X. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (4):480-483.
  35.  10
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1964). Popper on the Rule of Succession. Mind 73 (289):129.
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  36.  4
    Richard C. Jeffrey (1959). A Note on Finch's "an Explication of Counterfactuals by Probability Theory". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1):116.
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  37.  1
    Theron I. Cain (1944). Problems and Prospects of Civic Planning. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 3 (9/10):68-78.
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  38.  26
    Franz Dietrich, Christian List & Richard Bradley, Belief Revision Generalized: A Joint Characterization of Bayes's and Jeffrey's Rules.
    We present a general framework for representing belief-revision rules and use it to characterize Bayes's rule as a classical example and Jeffrey's rule as a non-classical one. In Jeffrey's rule, the input to a belief revision is not simply the information that some event has occurred, as in Bayes's rule, but a new assignment of probabilities to some events. Despite their differences, Bayes's and Jeffrey's rules can be characterized in terms of the same axioms: (...)
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  39.  92
    Ittay Nissan-Rozen (2013). Jeffrey Conditionalization, the Principal Principle, the Desire as Belief Thesis, and Adams's Thesis. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axs039.
    I show that David Lewis’s principal principle is not preserved under Jeffrey conditionalization. Using this observation, I argue that Lewis’s reason for rejecting the desire as belief thesis and Adams’s thesis applies also to his own principal principle. 1 Introduction2 Adams’s Thesis, the Desire as Belief Thesis, and the Principal Principle3 Jeffrey Conditionalization4 The Principal Principles Not Preserved under Jeffrey Conditionalization5 Inadmissible Experiences.
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  40.  20
    Lydia McGrew (2014). Jeffrey Conditioning, Rigidity, and the Defeasible Red Jelly Bean. Philosophical Studies 168 (2):569-582.
    Jonathan Weisberg has argued that Jeffrey Conditioning is inherently “anti-holistic” By this he means, inter alia, that JC does not allow us to take proper account of after-the-fact defeaters for our beliefs. His central example concerns the discovery that the lighting in a room is red-tinted and the relationship of that discovery to the belief that a jelly bean in the room is red. Weisberg’s argument that the rigidity required for JC blocks the defeating role of the red-tinted (...)
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  41.  13
    Ilho Park (2013). Simultaneous Belief Updates Via Successive Jeffrey Conditionalization. Synthese 190 (16):3511-3533.
    This paper discusses simultaneous belief updates. I argue here that modeling such belief updates using the Principle of Minimum Information can be regarded as applying Jeffrey conditionalization successively, and so that, contrary to what many probabilists have thought, the simultaneous belief updates can be successfully modeled by means of Jeffrey conditionalization.
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  42.  5
    Christopher F. French (2015). Explicating Formal Epistemology: Carnap's Legacy as Jeffrey's Radical Probabilism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 53:33–42.
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  43.  6
    Jeffrey Church (2014). Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future Ed. By Jeffrey Metzger (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):495-497.
    In his introduction, Jeffrey Metzger states that “at some point in the past 20 or 30 years … Nietzsche’s name [became] no longer associated primarily with nihilism” (1). Metzger is pointing to the increasing contemporary scholarly interest in Nietzsche’s epistemology, naturalism, and metaethics. The worthy aim of this volume is to ask us to examine once again the underlying philosophical problem to which these views are a response, namely, nihilism. This volume helpfully reminds us that Nietzsche’s philosophical motivation (...)
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  44.  66
    Antje Kahl (2014). Jeffrey P. Bishop, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power and the Care of the Dying. Human Studies 37 (4):589-596.
    “[T]here is something rotten at the heart of medicine” —this is one of the central statements of Jeffrey Paul Bishop in his book The Anticipatory Corpse. Medicine, Power and the Care of the Dying. The obvious, if somewhat morbid, thought that “rotten” would refer to the decaying body as the central subject of investigation is, however, misleading. Instead, Bishop aims to demonstrate that the modern trend of medicalizing dying and death is the wrong way.The book explores contemporary medicine’s (...)
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  45.  72
    Hartry Field (1978). A Note on Jeffrey Conditionalization. Philosophy of Science 45 (3):361-367.
    Bayesian decision theory can be viewed as the core of psychological theory for idealized agents. To get a complete psychological theory for such agents, you have to supplement it with input and output laws. On a Bayesian theory that employs strict conditionalization, the input laws are easy to give. On a Bayesian theory that employs Jeffrey conditionalization, there appears to be a considerable problem with giving the input laws. However, Jeffrey conditionalization can be reformulated so that (...)
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  46.  25
    Carl Wagner (2010). Jeffrey Conditioning and External Bayesianity. Logic Journal of the IGPL 18 (2):336-345.
    Suppose that several individuals who have separately assessed prior probability distributions over a set of possible states of the world wish to pool their individual distributions into a single group distribution, while taking into account jointly perceived new evidence. They have the option of first updating their individual priors and then pooling the resulting posteriors or first pooling their priors and then updating the resulting group prior. If the pooling method that they employ is such that they arrive at the (...)
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  47.  5
    Constantinos Hadjichristidis, Steven A. Sloman & David E. Over (2014). Categorical Induction From Uncertain Premises: Jeffrey's Doesn't Completely Rule. Thinking and Reasoning 20 (4):405-431.
    Studies of categorical induction typically examine how belief in a premise (e.g., Falcons have an ulnar artery) projects on to a conclusion (e.g., Robins have an ulnar artery). We study induction in cases in which the premise is uncertain (e.g., There is an 80% chance that falcons have an ulnar artery). Jeffrey's rule is a normative model for updating beliefs in the face of uncertain evidence. In three studies we tested the descriptive validity of Jeffrey's rule (...)
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  48.  95
    J. Williamson (2006). From Bayesianism to the Epistemic View of Mathematics: Review of R. Jeffrey, Subjective Probability: The Real Thing. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 14 (3):365-369.
    Subjective Probability: The Real Thing is the last book written by the late Richard Jeffrey, a key proponent of the Bayesian interpretation of probability.Bayesians hold that probability is a mental notion: saying that the probability of rain is 0.7 is just saying that you believe it will rain to degree 0.7. Degrees of belief are themselves cashed out in terms of bets—in this case you consider 7:3 to be fair odds for a bet on rain. There are two (...)
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  49.  19
    Mary P. Winsor (2001). Cain on Linnaeus: The Scientist-Historian as Unanalysed Entity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (2):239-254.
    Zoologist A. J. Cain began historical research on Linnaeus in 1956 in connection with his dissatisfaction over the standard taxonomic hierarchy and the rules of binomial nomenclature. His famous 1958 paper ‘Logic and Memory in Linnaeus's System of Taxonomy’ argues that Linnaeus was following Aristotle's method of logical division without appreciating that it properly applies only to ‘analysed entities’ such as geometric figures whose essential nature is already fully known. The essence of living things being unanalysed, there is no (...)
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  50.  20
    Nicholas Wolterstorff (2005). Jeffrey Stout on Democracy and its Contemporary Christian Critics. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):633-647.
    Jeffrey Stout addresses two of the main criticisms of liberal democracy by its contemporary neotraditionalist Christian critics: that liberal democracy is destructive of social tradition, and thereby of virtue in the citizenry, and that liberal democracy is inherently secular, committed to expunging religious voices from the public arena. I judge that Stout effectively answers these charges: liberal democracy has its own tradition, it cultivates the virtues relevant to that, and it is not inherently hostile to piety. What Stout (...)
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