Search results for 'Jeffrey Cole' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeffrey Cole (1990). Book Review: Media Ethics in the Newsroom and Beyond: A Book Review by Jeffrey Cole. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):63 – 65.score: 1740.0
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  2. Nathan Carlin, Cathy Rozmus, Jeffrey Spike, Irmgard Willcockson, William Seifert, Cynthia Chappell, Pei-Hsuan Hsieh, Thomas Cole, Catherine Flaitz, Joan Engebretson, Rebecca Lunstroth, Charles Amos & Bryant Boutwell (2011). The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):277-290.score: 240.0
    A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the health professions. The DIT contains certain (...)
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  3. Jeffrey Cole (1990). Media Ethics in the Newsroom and Beyond (Book). Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):63 – 65.score: 240.0
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  4. [deleted]Michael W. Cole, Joset A. Etzel, Jeffrey M. Zacks, Walter Schneider & Todd S. Braver (2011). Rapid Transfer of Abstract Rules to Novel Contexts in Human Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 240.0
    Flexible, adaptive behavior is thought to rely on abstract rule representations within lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), yet it remains unclear how these representations provide such flexibility. We recently demonstrated that humans can learn complex novel tasks in seconds. Here we hypothesized that this impressive mental flexibility may be possible due to rapid transfer of practiced rule representations within LPFC to novel task contexts. We tested this hypothesis using functional MRI and multivariate pattern analysis, classifying LPFC activity patterns across 64 tasks. (...)
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  5. Benjamin H. Levi & Michael J. Green (2013). Review of Jeffrey P. Spike, Thomas R. Cole, Richard Buday, Freeman Williams, and Mary Ann Pendino, The Brewsters. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):52 - 54.score: 120.0
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  6. Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole (1995). Body Image and Body Schema in a Deafferented Subject. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16:369-390.score: 60.0
    In a majority of situations the normal adult maintains posture or moves without consciously monitoring motor activity. Posture and movement are usually close to automatic; they tend to take care of themselves, outside of attentive regard. One's body, in such cases, effaces itself as one is geared into a particular intentional goal. This effacement is possible because of the normal functioning of a body schema. Body schema can be defined as a system of preconscious, subpersonal processes that play a dynamic (...)
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  7. Oliver Sacks, Jonathan Cole & Ian Waterman (2000). On the Immunity Principle: A View From a Robot. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167.score: 60.0
    Preprint of Cole, Sacks, and Waterman. 2000. "On the immunity principle: A view from a robot." Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (5): 167, a response to Shaun Gallagher, S. 2000. "Philosophical conceptions of the self: implications for cognitive science," Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (1):14-21. Also see Shaun Gallagher, Reply to Cole, Sacks, and Waterman Trends in Cognitive Science 4, No. 5 (2000): 167-68.
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  8. David Cole (2011). Michael Tye, Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (1):103-106.score: 60.0
    Michael Tye, Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts Content Type Journal Article Pages 103-106 DOI 10.1007/s11023-011-9225-3 Authors David Cole, Department of Philosophy, University of Minnesota-Duluth, 369 A.B. Anderson Hall, Duluth, MN 55812, USA Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495 Journal Volume Volume 21 Journal Issue Volume 21, Number 1.
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  9. David Cole (2009). Jerry Fodor, Lot 2: The Language of Thought Revisited , New York: Oxford University Press, 2008, X+228, $37.95, Isbn 978-0-119-954877-. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (3):439-443.score: 60.0
    Jerry Fodor, LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited , New York: Oxford University Press, 2008, x+228, $37.95, ISBN 978-0-119-954877-4 Content Type Journal Article Pages 439-443 DOI 10.1007/s11023-009-9164-4 Authors David Cole, University of Minnesota-Duluth Department of Philosophy 369 A B Anderson Hall Duluth MN 55812 USA Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495 Journal Volume Volume 19 Journal Issue Volume 19, Number 3.
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  10. K. C. Cole (2001). The Hole in the Universe: How Scientists Peered Over the Edge of Emptiness and Found Everything. Harcourt.score: 60.0
    Welcome to the world of cutting-edge math, physics, and neuroscience, where the search for the ultimate vacuum, the point of nothingness, ground zero of theory, has rendered the universe deep, rich, and juicy. "Modern physics has animated the void," says K. C. Cole in her entrancing journey into the heart of Nothing. Every time scientists and mathematicians think they have reached the ultimate void, new stuff appears: a black hole, an undulating string, an additional dimension of space or time, (...)
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  11. Christopher Heath Wellman & Phillip Cole (2011). Debating the Ethics of Immigration: Is There a Right to Exclude? OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Do states have the right to prevent potential immigrants from crossing their borders, or should people have the freedom to migrate and settle wherever they wish? Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole develop and defend opposing answers to this timely and important question. Appealing to the right to freedom of association, Wellman contends that legitimate states have broad discretion to exclude potential immigrants, even those who desperately seek to enter. Against this, Cole argues that the commitment to the (...)
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  12. Stephen Cole (1992). Making Science: Between Nature and Society. Harvard University Press.score: 60.0
    In Making Science, Cole shows how social variables and cognitive variables interact in the evaluation of frontier knowledge.
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  13. Thomas Cole (2009). Bryan S. Turner: Can We Live Forever? A Social and Moral Inquiry. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (3):301-303.score: 60.0
    Bryan S. Turner: Can We Live Forever? A Social and Moral Inquiry Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 301-303 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0024-6 Authors Thomas R. Cole, University of Texas-Houston School of Medicine McGovern Center for Health, Humanities, and the Human Spirit Houston TX 77030 USA Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 Print ISSN 1876-4533 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 3.
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  14. Richard C. Jeffrey (2004). Formal Logic: Its Scope and Limits. Hackett Pub..score: 60.0
    This brief paperback is designed for symbolic/formal logic courses. It features the tree method proof system developed by Jeffrey. The new edition contains many more examples and exercises and is reorganized for greater accessibility.
     
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  15. Jeffery Aubin, Marie Chantal, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Cathelyne Duchesne, Christel Freu, Steve Johnston, Brice C. Jones, Amaury Levillayer, Stã©Phanie Machabã©E., Paul-Hubert Poirier, Philippe Therrien, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Martin Voyer & Jennifer K. Wees (2013). Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 69 (2):327-402.score: 60.0
    Jeffery Aubin ,Marie Chantal ,Dianne Cole ,Julio Chaves ,Cathelyne Duchesne ,Christel Freu ,Steve Johnston ,Brice Jones ,Amaury Levillayer ,Stéphanie Machabée ,Paul-Hubert Poirier ,Philippe Therrien ,Jonathan von Kodar ,Martin Voyer ,Jennifer Wees ,Eric Crégheur.
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  16. Richard C. Jeffrey (1992). Probability and the Art of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Richard Jeffrey is beyond dispute one of the most distinguished and influential philosophers working in the field of decision theory and the theory of knowledge. His work is distinctive in showing the interplay of epistemological concerns with probability and utility theory. Not only has he made use of standard probabilistic and decision theoretic tools to clarify concepts of evidential support and informed choice, he has also proposed significant modifications of the standard Bayesian position in order that it provide a (...)
     
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  17. Jonathan Cole, Natalie Depraz & Shaun Gallagher, Unity and Disunity in Bodily Awareness: Phenomenology and Neuroscience. Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness Workshop.score: 30.0
  18. David J. Cole (1991). Artificial Intelligence and Personal Identity. Synthese 88 (September):399-417.score: 30.0
    Considerations of personal identity bear on John Searle's Chinese Room argument, and on the opposed position that a computer itself could really understand a natural language. In this paper I develop the notion of a virtual person, modelled on the concept of virtual machines familiar in computer science. I show how Searle's argument, and J. Maloney's attempt to defend it, fail. I conclude that Searle is correct in holding that no digital machine could understand language, but wrong in holding that (...)
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  19. David J. Cole (2002). The Function of Consciousness. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins. 287-305.score: 30.0
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  20. David J. Cole, Inverted Spectrum Arguments.score: 30.0
    Formerly a spectral apparition that haunted behaviorism and provided a puzzle about our knowledge of other minds, the inverted spectrum possibility has emerged as an important challenge to functionalist accounts of qualia. The inverted spectrum hypothesis raises the possibility that two individuals might think and behave in the same way yet have different qualia. The traditional supposition is of an individual who has a subjective color spectrum that is inverted with regard to that had by other individuals. When he looks (...)
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  21. David J. Cole (1984). Thought and Thought Experiments. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):431-44.score: 30.0
    Thought experiments have been used by philosophers for centuries, especially in the study of personal identity where they appear to have been used extensively and indiscriminately. Despite their prevalence, the use of thought experiments in this area of philosophy has been criticized in recent times. Bernard Williams criticizes the conclusions that are drawn from some experiments, and retells one of these experiments from a different perspective, a retelling which leads to a seemingly opposing result. Wilkes criticizes the method of thought (...)
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  22. David J. Cole (1994). Thought and Qualia. Minds and Machines 4 (3):283-302.score: 30.0
    I present a theory of the nature and basis of the conscious experience characteristic of occurent propositional attitudes: thinking this or that. As a preliminary I offer an extended criticism of Paul Schweizer's treatment of such consciousness as unexplained secondary qualities of neural events. I also attempt to rebut arguments against the possibility of functionalist accounts of conscious experience and qualia.
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  23. David J. Cole (1990). Functionalism and Inverted Spectra. Synthese 82 (2):207-22.score: 30.0
    Functionalism, a philosophical theory, has empirical consequences. Functionalism predicts that where systematic transformations of sensory input occur and are followed by behavioral accommodation in which normal function of the organism is restored such that the causes and effects of the subject's psychological states return to those of the period prior to the transformation, there will be a return of qualia or subjective experiences to those present prior to the transform. A transformation of this type that has long been of philosophical (...)
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  24. David J. Cole, Dretske on Naturalizing the Mind.score: 30.0
    Dretske’s Naturalizing the Mind sets out the case for holding that mental states in general are natural representers of reality. Mental states have functions; for many states the function is to indicate what is going on in the world. Among such indicator states are beliefs. The content of these states is given by what they are supposed to represent. So if a state is supposed to indicate that it’s dark, then “it’s dark” is the content of the state. Thus we (...)
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  25. David J. Cole, Hearing Yourself Think: Natural Language, Inner Speech, and Thought.score: 30.0
    "Mantras were not viewed as the only means of expressing truth, however. Thought, which was defined as internalized speech, offered yet another aspect of truth. And if words and thoughts designated different aspects of truth, or reality, then there had to be an underlying unity behind all phenomena" (S. A. Nigosian 1994: World Faiths, p. 84).
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  26. David J. Cole (1999). I Don't Think So: Pinker on the Mentalese Monopoly. Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):283-295.score: 30.0
    Stephen Pinker sets out over a dozen arguments in The language instinct (Morrow, New York, 1994) for his widely shared view that natural language is inadequate as a medium for thought. Thus he argues we must suppose that the primary medium of thought and inference is an innate propositional representation system, mentalese. I reply to the various arguments and so defend the view that some thought essentially involves natural language. I argue mentalese doesn't solve any of the problems Pinker cites (...)
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  27. David Cole, Images and Thinking: Critique of Arguments Against Images as a Medium of Thought.score: 30.0
    The Way of Ideas died an ignoble death, committed to the flames by behaviorist empiricists. Ideas, pictures in the head, perished with the Way. By the time those empiricists were supplanted at the helm by functionalists and causal theorists, a revolution had taken place in linguistics and the last thing anyone wanted to do was revive images as the medium of thought. Currently, some but not all cognitive scientists think that there probably are mental images - experiments in cognitive psychology (...)
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  28. David J. Cole, Natural Language and Natural Meaning.score: 30.0
    In Book II of the _Essay_, at the beginning of his discussion of language in Chapter II ("Of the Signification of Words"), John Locke writes that we humans have a variety of thoughts which might profit others, but that unfortunately these thoughts lie invisible and hidden from others. And so we use language to communicate these thoughts. As a result, "words, in their primary or immediate signification,stand for nothing but _the ideas in the mind of him that uses them_.
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  29. David J. Cole, Pinker on the Thinker: Against Mentalese Monopoly.score: 30.0
    thought and problem solving in persons lacking natural language altogether would be a decisive challenge, but there is no clear evidence of any abstract thinking capabilities similar to those evinced by the scientists. Pinker cites languageless persons rebuilding broken locks - this is evidence of perhaps visual imagery, but not mentalese (at least not without quite a bit more detail and argument than we are given). Spiders, e.g., build marvelous things, but no inference to spiderese appears to be warranted. There (...)
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  30. Richard C. Jeffrey (1956). Valuation and Acceptance of Scientific Hypotheses. Philosophy of Science 23 (3):237-246.score: 30.0
  31. Jonathan Cole (2007). The Phenomenology of Agency and Intention in the Face of Paralysis and Insentience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):309-325.score: 30.0
    Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord injury, sensory neuronopathy syndrome or motor stroke), or with experimental paralysis or sensory loss. The differing phenomenology of these is explored and their effects on intention and agency discussed. It (...)
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  32. David J. Cole, Sense and Sentience.score: 30.0
    Surely one of the most interesting problems in the study of mind concerns the nature of sentience. How is it that there are sensations, rather than merely sensings? What is it like to be a bat -- or why is it like anything at all? Why aren't we automata or responding but unfeeling Zombies? How does neural activity give rise to subjective experience? As Leibniz put the problem (Monadology section 17):
    _It must be confessed, however, that Perception_ [consciousness?]_, and (...)
    _anything to explain Perception._ [Montgomery trans.]. (shrink)
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  33. Richard C. Jeffrey (1974). Preference Among Preferences. Journal of Philosophy 71 (13):377-391.score: 30.0
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  34. Richard Cole (1968). Falsifiability. Mind 77 (305):133-135.score: 30.0
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  35. David J. Cole (1991). Artificial Minds: Cam on Searle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (September):329-33.score: 30.0
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  36. Richard Jeffrey (1987). Indefinite Probability Judgment: A Reply to Levi. Philosophy of Science 54 (4):586-591.score: 30.0
    Isaac Levi and I have different views of probability and decision making. Here, without addressing the merits, I will try to answer some questions recently asked by Levi (1985) about what my view is, and how it relates to his.
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  37. Frank S. Kessel, P. M. Cole & D. L. Johnson (eds.) (1992). Self and Consciousness: Multiple Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 30.0
    This volume contains an array of essays that reflect, and reflect upon, the recent revival of scholarly interest in the self and consciousness. Various relevant issues are addressed in conceptually challenging ways, such as how consciousness and different forms of self-relevant experience develop in infancy and childhood and are related to the acquisition of skill; the role of the self in social development; the phenomenology of being conscious and its metapsychological implications; and the cultural foundations of conceptualizations of consciousness. Written (...)
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  38. Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.score: 30.0
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  39. Jonathan Cole (2000). "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.score: 30.0
  40. David Cole (2002). Jerry Fodor, Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 12 (3):443-448.score: 30.0
  41. Richard C. Jeffrey (1971). On Interpersonal Utility Theory. Journal of Philosophy 68 (20):647-656.score: 30.0
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  42. Richard Jeffrey (1993). Take Back the Day! Jon Dorling's Bayesian Solution of the Duhem Problem. Philosophical Issues 3:197-207.score: 30.0
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  43. Barbara Abbott, Annette Herskovits, Philip L. Peterson, Alfred R. Mele, David J. Cole, Daniel Crevier, Francis Jeffry Pelletier, Istvan S. N. Berkeley, Brendan J. Kitts, Mike Brown & George Paliouras (1996). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 6 (2):239-285.score: 30.0
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  44. Phillip Cole (2007). The Body Politic: Theorising Disability and Impairment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):169–176.score: 30.0
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  45. Phillip Cole (2000). Embracing the “Nation”. Res Publica 6 (3):237-257.score: 30.0
    The idea of the “nation” has played only a small role in modern political philosophy because of its apparent irrationalism and amoralism. David Miller, however, sets out to show that these charges can be overcome: nationality is a rational element of one’s cultural identity, and nations are genuinely ethical communities. In this paper I argue that his project fails. The defence against the charge of irrationalism fails because Miller works within a framework of ethical particularism which leads to a position (...)
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  46. David Robert Cole (2010). The Reproduction of Philosophical Bodies in Education with Language. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):816-829.score: 30.0
    This paper articulates a feminist poststructural philosophy of education by combining the work of Luce Irigaray and Michel Foucault. This acts as an underpinning for a philosophy of desire (McWilliam, 1999) in education, or as a minor philosophy of education where multiple movements of bodies are enacted through theoretical methodologies and research. These methods include qualitative analysis and critical discourse analysis; where the conjunction Irigaray-Foucault is a paradigm for dealing with educational phenomena. It is also a rigorous materialism (Braidotti, 2005) (...)
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  47. Richard C. Jeffrey (1965). Ethics and the Logic of Decision. Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):528-539.score: 30.0
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  48. Richard Jeffrey (2002). Logicism Lite. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):474-496.score: 30.0
    Logicism Lite counts number‐theoretical laws as logical for the same sort of reason for which physical laws are counted as as empirical: because of the character of the data they are responsible to. In the case of number theory these are the data verifying or falsifying the simplest equations, which Logicism Lite counts as true or false depending on the logical validity or invalidity of first‐order argument forms in which no numbertheoretical notation appears.
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  49. Richard Jeffrey (1992). Radical Probabilism (Prospectus for a User's Manual). Philosophical Issues 2:193-204.score: 30.0
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  50. Peter Cole (1985). Quantifier Scope and the ECP. Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (2):283 - 289.score: 30.0
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