Search results for 'Jeffrey Cole' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Jeffrey Cole (1990). Book Review: Media Ethics in the Newsroom and Beyond: A Book Review by Jeffrey Cole. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):63 – 65.
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  2.  10
    Nathan Carlin, Cathy Rozmus, Jeffrey Spike, Irmgard Willcockson, William Seifert, Cynthia Chappell, Pei-Hsuan Hsieh, Thomas Cole, Catherine Flaitz, Joan Engebretson, Rebecca Lunstroth, Charles Amos & Bryant Boutwell (2011). The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):277-290.
    A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the health professions. The DIT contains certain (...)
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  3.  3
    Jeffrey Cole (1990). Media Ethics in the Newsroom and Beyond (Book). Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):63 – 65.
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    Richard C. Jeffrey (1970). Miller David. A Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 59–61.Popper Karl R.. A Comment on Miller's New Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 61–69.Popper Karl R.. A Paradox of Zero Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 141–143.Mackie J. L.. Miller's so-Called Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 144–147.Miller David. On a so-Called so-Called Paradox: A Reply to Professor J. L. Mackie. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 147–149.Bub Jeffrey and Radner Michael. Miller's Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 1 , Pp. 63–67.Miller David. The Straight and Narrow Rule of Induction: A Reply to Dr Bub and Mr Radner. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 2, Pp. 145–151.Rozeboom. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):124-127.
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  5.  13
    Rudolf Carnap & Richard C. Jeffrey (1972). Book Review:Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability Rudolf Carnap, Richard C. Jeffrey. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 39 (4):549-.
  6. F. J. Cole & Herbert Friedmann (1948). History of Comparative Anatomy. From Aristotle to the Eighteenth CenturyFrancis J. Cole. Isis 38 (3/4):264-266.
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  7. Peter Cole (1978). Pragmatics Edited by Peter Cole. --. Academic Press.
     
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  8. Domenico Costantini, Maria Carla Galavotti & Richard C. Jeffrey (1997). Probability, Dynamics, and Causality Essays in Honour of Richard C. Jeffrey.
     
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  9. Martin Luther & Henry Cole (1823). Martin Luther on the Bondage of the Will, Written in Answer to the Diatribe of Erasmus on Free-Will, Tr. By H. Cole.
     
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  10. Benjamin H. Levi & Michael J. Green (2013). Review of Jeffrey P. Spike, Thomas R. Cole, Richard Buday, Freeman Williams, and Mary Ann Pendino, The Brewsters. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):52 - 54.
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  11. Benjamin H. Levi & Michael J. Green (2013). Review of Jeffrey P. Spike, Thomas R. Cole, Richard Buday, Freeman Williams, and Mary Ann Pendino,The Brewsters. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):52-54.
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  12.  42
    Richard C. Jeffrey (2004). Formal Logic: Its Scope and Limits. Hackett Pub..
    This brief paperback is designed for symbolic/formal logic courses. It features the tree method proof system developed by Jeffrey. The new edition contains many more examples and exercises and is reorganized for greater accessibility.
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  13. Richard C. Jeffrey (1992). Probability and the Art of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Jeffrey is beyond dispute one of the most distinguished and influential philosophers working in the field of decision theory and the theory of knowledge. His work is distinctive in showing the interplay of epistemological concerns with probability and utility theory. Not only has he made use of standard probabilistic and decision theoretic tools to clarify concepts of evidential support and informed choice, he has also proposed significant modifications of the standard Bayesian position in order that it provide a (...)
     
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  14.  45
    Christopher Heath Wellman & Phillip Cole (2011). Debating the Ethics of Immigration: Is There a Right to Exclude? OUP Usa.
    Do states have the right to prevent potential immigrants from crossing their borders, or should people have the freedom to migrate and settle wherever they wish? Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole develop and defend opposing answers to this timely and important question.
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  15. Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole (1995). Body Image and Body Schema in a Deafferented Subject. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (4):369-390.
    In a majority of situations the normal adult maintains posture or moves without consciously monitoring motor activity. Posture and movement are usually close to automatic; they tend to take care of themselves, outside of attentive regard. One's body, in such cases, effaces itself as one is geared into a particular intentional goal. This effacement is possible because of the normal functioning of a body schema. Body schema can be defined as a system of preconscious, subpersonal processes that play a dynamic (...)
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  16.  13
    Stephen Cole (1992). Making Science: Between Nature and Society. Harvard University Press.
    In Making Science, Cole shows how social variables and cognitive variables interact in the evaluation of frontier knowledge.
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  17. Christopher Heath Wellman & Phillip Cole (2011). Debating the Ethics of Immigration: Is There a Right to Exclude? Oxford University Press Usa.
    Do states have the right to prevent potential immigrants from crossing their borders, or should people have the freedom to migrate and settle wherever they wish? Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole develop and defend opposing answers to this timely and important question. Appealing to the right to freedom of association, Wellman contends that legitimate states have broad discretion to exclude potential immigrants, even those who desperately seek to enter. Against this, Cole argues that the commitment to the (...)
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  18. Oliver Sacks, Jonathan Cole & Ian Waterman (2000). On the Immunity Principle: A View From a Robot. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167.
    Preprint of Cole, Sacks, and Waterman. 2000. "On the immunity principle: A view from a robot." Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (5): 167, a response to Shaun Gallagher, S. 2000. "Philosophical conceptions of the self: implications for cognitive science," Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (1):14-21. Also see Shaun Gallagher, Reply to Cole, Sacks, and Waterman Trends in Cognitive Science 4, No. 5 (2000): 167-68.
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  19.  97
    David Cole (2011). Michael Tye, Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (1):103-106.
    Michael Tye, Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts Content Type Journal Article Pages 103-106 DOI 10.1007/s11023-011-9225-3 Authors David Cole, Department of Philosophy, University of Minnesota-Duluth, 369 A.B. Anderson Hall, Duluth, MN 55812, USA Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495 Journal Volume Volume 21 Journal Issue Volume 21, Number 1.
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  20.  4
    Jeffery Aubin, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Anne-France Morand, Timothy Pettipiece, Paul-Hubert Poirier, Martin Voyer & Eric Crégheur (2015). Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 71 (3):503-553.
    Jeffery Aubin,Dianne Cole,Julio Cesar Dias Chaves,Jonathan von Kodar,Anne-France Morand,Timothy Pettipiece,Paul-Hubert Poirier,Martin Voyer,Eric Crégheur.
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  21.  66
    David Cole (2009). Jerry Fodor, Lot 2: The Language of Thought Revisited , New York: Oxford University Press, 2008, X+228, $37.95, Isbn 978-0-119-954877-. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (3):439-443.
    Jerry Fodor, LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited , New York: Oxford University Press, 2008, x+228, $37.95, ISBN 978-0-119-954877-4 Content Type Journal Article Pages 439-443 DOI 10.1007/s11023-009-9164-4 Authors David Cole, University of Minnesota-Duluth Department of Philosophy 369 A B Anderson Hall Duluth MN 55812 USA Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495 Journal Volume Volume 19 Journal Issue Volume 19, Number 3.
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  22.  27
    K. C. Cole (2001). The Hole in the Universe: How Scientists Peered Over the Edge of Emptiness and Found Everything. Harcourt.
    Welcome to the world of cutting-edge math, physics, and neuroscience, where the search for the ultimate vacuum, the point of nothingness, ground zero of theory, has rendered the universe deep, rich, and juicy. "Modern physics has animated the void," says K. C. Cole in her entrancing journey into the heart of Nothing. Every time scientists and mathematicians think they have reached the ultimate void, new stuff appears: a black hole, an undulating string, an additional dimension of space or time, (...)
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  23.  12
    Thomas Cole (2009). Bryan S. Turner: Can We Live Forever? A Social and Moral Inquiry. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (3):301-303.
    Bryan S. Turner: Can We Live Forever? A Social and Moral Inquiry Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 301-303 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0024-6 Authors Thomas R. Cole, University of Texas-Houston School of Medicine McGovern Center for Health, Humanities, and the Human Spirit Houston TX 77030 USA Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 Print ISSN 1876-4533 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 3.
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  24.  3
    Jeffery Aubin, Marie Chantal, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Cathelyne Duchesne, Christel Freu, Steve Johnston, Brice C. Jones, Amaury Levillayer, Stéphanie Machabée, Paul-Hubert Poirier, Philippe Therrien, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Martin Voyer, Jennifer K. Wees & Eric Crégheur (2013). Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 69 (2):327.
    Jeffery Aubin ,Marie Chantal ,Dianne Cole ,Julio Chaves ,Cathelyne Duchesne ,Christel Freu ,Steve Johnston ,Brice Jones ,Amaury Levillayer ,Stéphanie Machabée ,Paul-Hubert Poirier ,Philippe Therrien ,Jonathan von Kodar ,Martin Voyer ,Jennifer Wees ,Eric Crégheur.
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  25. Andrew Cole (2014). The Birth of Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    Modern theory needs a history lesson. Neither Marx nor Nietzsche first gave us theory—Hegel did. To support this contention, Andrew Cole’s _The Birth of Theory_ presents a refreshingly clear and lively account of the origins and legacy of Hegel’s dialectic as theory. Cole explains how Hegel boldly broke from modern philosophy when he adopted medieval dialectical habits of thought to fashion his own dialectic. While his contemporaries rejected premodern dialectic as outdated dogma, Hegel embraced both its emphasis on (...)
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  26. Andrew Cole & D. Vance Smith (eds.) (2010). The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages: On the Unwritten History of Theory. Duke University Press Books.
    This collection of essays argues that any valid theory of the modern should—indeed must—reckon with the medieval. Offering a much-needed correction to theorists such as Hans Blumenberg, who in his _Legitimacy of the Modern Age_ describes the “modern age” as a complete departure from the Middle Ages, these essays forcefully show that thinkers from Adorno to Žižek have repeatedly drawn from medieval sources to theorize modernity. To forget the medieval, or to discount its continued effect on contemporary thought, is to (...)
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  27. Andrew Cole & D. Vance Smith (eds.) (2010). The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages: On the Unwritten History of Theory. Duke University Press Books.
    This collection of essays argues that any valid theory of the modern should—indeed must—reckon with the medieval. Offering a much-needed correction to theorists such as Hans Blumenberg, who in his _Legitimacy of the Modern Age_ describes the “modern age” as a complete departure from the Middle Ages, these essays forcefully show that thinkers from Adorno to Žižek have repeatedly drawn from medieval sources to theorize modernity. To forget the medieval, or to discount its continued effect on contemporary thought, is to (...)
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  28. Richard Jeffrey (2012). Probability and the Art of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Richard Jeffrey is beyond dispute one of the most distinguished and influential philosophers working in the field of decision theory and the theory of knowledge. His work is distinctive in showing the interplay of epistemological concerns with probability and utility theory. Not only has he made use of standard probabilistic and decision theoretic tools to clarify concepts of evidential support and informed choice, he has also proposed significant modifications of the standard Bayesian position in order that it provide a (...)
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  29.  13
    Barbara C. Cole & Dennie L. Smith (1996). Perceptions of Business Ethics: Students Vs. Business People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):889 - 896.
    The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of business students and of business practitioners regarding ethics in business. A survey consisting of a series of brief ethical situations was completed by 537 senior business majors and 158 experienced business people. They responded to the situations, first, as they believed the typical business person would respond and, second, as they believed the ethical response would be.The results indicate that both students and business people perceived a significant gap between (...)
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  30.  13
    Dennis Cole, M. Joseph Sirgy & Monroe Murphy Bird (2000). How Do Managers Make Teleological Evaluations in Ethical Dilemmas? Testing Part of and Extending the Hunt-Vitell Model. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (3):259 - 269.
    A study involving purchasing managers was conducted to test specific Hunt-Vitell theoretical propositions concerning the determinants of managers' teleological evaluations. We extended the Hunt-Vitell model by developing a new integrative construct, namely the desirability of consequences to self versus others. We hypothesized that desirability of consequences affects teleological evaluations in that the more desirable the consequences of a particular action, the more likely managers evaluate that action positively. The results of the present study provided support for this hypothesis. Furthermore, we (...)
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  31. David J. Cole (1991). Artificial Intelligence and Personal Identity. Synthese 88 (September):399-417.
    Considerations of personal identity bear on John Searle's Chinese Room argument, and on the opposed position that a computer itself could really understand a natural language. In this paper I develop the notion of a virtual person, modelled on the concept of virtual machines familiar in computer science. I show how Searle's argument, and J. Maloney's attempt to defend it, fail. I conclude that Searle is correct in holding that no digital machine could understand language, but wrong in holding that (...)
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  32. David J. Cole (1984). Thought and Thought Experiments. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):431-44.
    Thought experiments have been used by philosophers for centuries, especially in the study of personal identity where they appear to have been used extensively and indiscriminately. Despite their prevalence, the use of thought experiments in this area of philosophy has been criticized in recent times. Bernard Williams criticizes the conclusions that are drawn from some experiments, and retells one of these experiments from a different perspective, a retelling which leads to a seemingly opposing result. Wilkes criticizes the method of thought (...)
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  33. Jonathan Cole, Natalie Depraz & Shaun Gallagher (2000). Unity and Disunity in Bodily Awareness: Phenomenology and Neuroscience. Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness Workshop.
  34. David J. Cole (1990). Functionalism and Inverted Spectra. Synthese 82 (2):207-22.
    Functionalism, a philosophical theory, has empirical consequences. Functionalism predicts that where systematic transformations of sensory input occur and are followed by behavioral accommodation in which normal function of the organism is restored such that the causes and effects of the subject's psychological states return to those of the period prior to the transformation, there will be a return of qualia or subjective experiences to those present prior to the transform. A transformation of this type that has long been of philosophical (...)
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  35. David J. Cole (2002). The Function of Consciousness. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins 287-305.
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  36. David J. Cole, Inverted Spectrum Arguments.
    Formerly a spectral apparition that haunted behaviorism and provided a puzzle about our knowledge of other minds, the inverted spectrum possibility has emerged as an important challenge to functionalist accounts of qualia. The inverted spectrum hypothesis raises the possibility that two individuals might think and behave in the same way yet have different qualia. The traditional supposition is of an individual who has a subjective color spectrum that is inverted with regard to that had by other individuals. When he looks (...)
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  37. David J. Cole (1994). Thought and Qualia. Minds and Machines 4 (3):283-302.
    I present a theory of the nature and basis of the conscious experience characteristic of occurent propositional attitudes: thinking this or that. As a preliminary I offer an extended criticism of Paul Schweizer's treatment of such consciousness as unexplained secondary qualities of neural events. I also attempt to rebut arguments against the possibility of functionalist accounts of conscious experience and qualia.
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  38. David J. Cole, Hearing Yourself Think: Natural Language, Inner Speech, and Thought.
    "Mantras were not viewed as the only means of expressing truth, however. Thought, which was defined as internalized speech, offered yet another aspect of truth. And if words and thoughts designated different aspects of truth, or reality, then there had to be an underlying unity behind all phenomena" (S. A. Nigosian 1994: World Faiths, p. 84).
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  39.  53
    Phillip Cole (1997). Problems with “Persons”. Res Publica 3 (2):165-183.
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  40.  74
    David J. Cole (1999). I Don't Think So: Pinker on the Mentalese Monopoly. Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):283-295.
    Stephen Pinker sets out over a dozen arguments in The language instinct (Morrow, New York, 1994) for his widely shared view that natural language is inadequate as a medium for thought. Thus he argues we must suppose that the primary medium of thought and inference is an innate propositional representation system, mentalese. I reply to the various arguments and so defend the view that some thought essentially involves natural language. I argue mentalese doesn't solve any of the problems Pinker cites (...)
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  41.  92
    David J. Cole, Pinker on the Thinker: Against Mentalese Monopoly.
    thought and problem solving in persons lacking natural language altogether would be a decisive challenge, but there is no clear evidence of any abstract thinking capabilities similar to those evinced by the scientists. Pinker cites languageless persons rebuilding broken locks - this is evidence of perhaps visual imagery, but not mentalese (at least not without quite a bit more detail and argument than we are given). Spiders, e.g., build marvelous things, but no inference to spiderese appears to be warranted. There (...)
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  42.  23
    Phillip Cole (2007). The Body Politic: Theorising Disability and Impairment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):169–176.
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  43.  29
    Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  44.  73
    David J. Cole, Dretske on Naturalizing the Mind.
    Dretske’s Naturalizing the Mind sets out the case for holding that mental states in general are natural representers of reality. Mental states have functions; for many states the function is to indicate what is going on in the world. Among such indicator states are beliefs. The content of these states is given by what they are supposed to represent. So if a state is supposed to indicate that it’s dark, then “it’s dark” is the content of the state. Thus we (...)
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  45.  49
    David J. Cole (1991). Artificial Minds: Cam on Searle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (September):329-33.
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  46.  70
    Jonathan Cole (2007). The Phenomenology of Agency and Intention in the Face of Paralysis and Insentience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):309-325.
    Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord injury, sensory neuronopathy syndrome or motor stroke), or with experimental paralysis or sensory loss. The differing phenomenology of these is explored and their effects on intention and agency discussed. It (...)
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  47.  65
    David Cole, Images and Thinking: Critique of Arguments Against Images as a Medium of Thought.
    The Way of Ideas died an ignoble death, committed to the flames by behaviorist empiricists. Ideas, pictures in the head, perished with the Way. By the time those empiricists were supplanted at the helm by functionalists and causal theorists, a revolution had taken place in linguistics and the last thing anyone wanted to do was revive images as the medium of thought. Currently, some but not all cognitive scientists think that there probably are mental images - experiments in cognitive psychology (...)
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  48. David J. Cole & F. Foelber (1984). Contingent Materialism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (1):74-85.
     
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  49.  63
    David J. Cole, Natural Language and Natural Meaning.
    In Book II of the _Essay_, at the beginning of his discussion of language in Chapter II ("Of the Signification of Words"), John Locke writes that we humans have a variety of thoughts which might profit others, but that unfortunately these thoughts lie invisible and hidden from others. And so we use language to communicate these thoughts. As a result, "words, in their primary or immediate signification,stand for nothing but _the ideas in the mind of him that uses them_.
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  50.  24
    Richard Cole (1965). A Note on Informal Fallacies. Mind 74 (295):432-433.
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