Search results for 'Jeffrey E. Pfeifer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeffrey E. Pfeifer & John C. Brigham (1993). Ethical Concerns of Nonclinical Forensic Witnesses and Consultants. Ethics and Behavior 3 (3 & 4):329 – 343.score: 870.0
    Current research suggests that nonclinical forensic psychologists[sup1] are appearing increasingly more often in the legal arena. We argue that many of the ethical dilemmas that face these psychologists differ from those encountered by clinical forensic psychologists. To test the accuracy of this assertion, 37 nonclinical forensic psychologists were surveyed to identify some of the ethical issues and dilemmas they have encountered while engaging in expert testimony or pretrial consulting. Respondents were asked also about how they have resolved these ethical issues (...)
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  2. Jeffrey E. Pfeifer & Thomas Hadjistavropoulos (1998). Introduction. Ethics and Behavior 8 (3):195 – 197.score: 870.0
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  3. Luzia Iara Pfeifer, Patrícia Gonçalves Rombe & Jair Licio Ferreira Santos (2009). A Influência Socieconômica E Cultural No Brincar de Pré-Escolares. Paideia 19 (43):249-255.score: 360.0
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  4. David E. Pfeifer (forthcoming). The Question of Reference in the Writings of JA Fodor and JJ Katz. Foundations of Language.score: 240.0
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  5. David E. Pfeifer (2008). Peirce on Semiosis, the Quasi-Mind, and God. Semiotics:57-65.score: 240.0
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  6. David E. Pfeifer (forthcoming). The Primacy of Procreative Action in Peirce’s Semiosis. Semiotics:107-116.score: 240.0
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  7. A. J. B. Fugard, Niki Pfeifer, B. Mayerhofer & Gernot D. Kleiter (2011). How People Interpret Conditionals: Shifts Towards the Conditional Event. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):635-648.score: 120.0
    We investigated how people interpret conditionals and how stable their interpretation is over a long series of trials. Participants were shown the colored patterns on each side of a six-sided die, and were asked how sure they were that a conditional holds of the side landing upwards when the die is randomly thrown. Participants were presented with 71 trials consisting of all combinations of binary dimensions of shape (e.g., circles and squares) and color (e.g., blue and red) painted onto the (...)
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  8. Karl Pfeifer (1997). Laughter, Freshness, and Titillation. Inquiry 40 (3):307 – 322.score: 120.0
    Robert C. Roberts's suggestion that the conditions for laughter at humor (e.g. jokes) can best be captured with a notion of freshness, as opposed to surprise, is pursued. The relationship freshness has to setup and surprise is clarified, and the place of freshness within a larger system of structuring metaphors is alluded to. The question of whether freshness can also cover laughter at the nonhumorous (e.g. tickling) is then taken up, it being determined that such coverage is possible but uneven. (...)
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  9. A. J. B. Fugard, Niki Pfeifer, B. Mayerhofer & G. D. Kleiter (2011). How People Interpret Conditionals: Shifts Towards the Conditional Event. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):635-648.score: 120.0
    We investigated how people interpret conditionals and how stable their interpretation is over a long series of trials. Participants were shown the colored patterns on each side of a six-sided die, and were asked how sure they were that a conditional holds of the side landing upwards when the die is randomly thrown. Participants were presented with 71 trials consisting of all combinations of binary dimensions of shape (e.g., circles and squares) and color (e.g., blue and red) painted onto the (...)
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  10. Niki Pfeifer (2006). Contemporary Syllogistics: Comparative and Quantitative Syllogisms. In G. Kreuzbauer & G. J. W. Dorn (eds.), Argumentation in Theorie Und Praxis: Philosophie Und Didaktik des Argumentierens. Lit. 57--71.score: 120.0
    Traditionally, syllogisms are arguments with two premises and one conclusion which are constructed by propositions of the form “All… are…” and “At least one… is…” and their respective negated versions. Unfortunately, the practical use of traditional syllogisms is quite restricted. On the one hand, the “All…” propositions are too strict, since a single counterexample suffices for falsification. On the other hand, the “At least one …” propositions are too weak, since a single example suffices for verification. The present contribution studies (...)
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  11. [deleted]Joshua C. Poore, Jennifer H. Pfeifer, Elliot T. Berkman, Tristen K. Inagaki, Benjamin L. Welborn & Matthew D. Lieberman (2012). Prediction-Error in the Context of Real Social Relationships Modulates Reward System Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
    The human reward system is sensitive to both social (e.g., validation) and non-social rewards (e.g., money) and is likely integral for relationship development and reputation building. However, data is sparse on the question of whether implicit social reward processing meaningfully contributes to explicit social representations such as trust and attachment security in pre-existing relationships. This event-related fMRI experiment examined reward system prediction-error activity in response to a potent social reward—social validation—and this activity’s relation to both attachment security and trust in (...)
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  12. [deleted]Matthew D. Lieberman Joshua C. Poore, Jennifer H. Pfeifer, Elliot T. Berkman, Tristen K. Inagaki, Benjamin L. Welborn (2012). Prediction-Error in the Context of Real Social Relationships Modulates Reward System Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 12.0
    The human reward system is sensitive to both social (e.g., validation) and non-social rewards (e.g., money) and is likely integral for relationship development and reputation building. However, data is sparse on the question of whether implicit social reward processing meaningfully contributes to explicit social representations such as trust and attachment security in pre-existing relationships. This event-related fMRI experiment examined reward system prediction-error activity in response to a potent social reward—social validation—and this activity’s relation to both attachment security and trust in (...)
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