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Profile: Jeffrey Hershfield (Wichita State University)
  1. Jeffrey Hershfield (2012). Missed It By That Much: Austin on Norms of Truth. Philosophia 40 (2):357-363.
    A principal challenge for a deflationary theory is to explain the value of truth: why we aim for true beliefs, abhor dishonesty, and so on. The problem arises because deflationism sees truth as a mere logical property and the truth predicate as serving primarily as a device of generalization. Paul Horwich, attempts to show how deflationism can account for the value of truth. Drawing on the work of J. L. Austin, I argue that his account, which focuses on belief, cannot (...)
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  2. Jeffrey Hershfield (2011). Critical Notice/Études critiqueJohn Searle's Making the Social World. Dialogue 50 (04):759-778.
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  3. Jeffrey Hershfield (2010). What Can Austin Tell Us About Truth? Philosophical Investigations 33 (3):220-228.
    In recent discussions of the problem of truth, Austin's views have been largely overlooked. This is unfortunate, since many of his criticisms aimed at Strawson's redundancy theory carry over to more recent incarnations of deflationism. And unlike contemporary versions of the correspondence theory of truth, Austin's manages properly to situate truth in its conceptual neighbourhood wherein it belongs to “a whole dimension of different appraisals which have something or other to do with the relation between what we say and the (...)
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  4. Jeffrey Hershfield (2009). The Ethics of Sexual Fantasy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):27-49.
    I defend the thesis that a person’s sexual fantasies function autonomously from his desires, beliefs, and intentions, a fact I attributeto their different forms of intentionality: the contents of sexual fantasies, unlike those of the latter, lack a direction of fit and thus fail to express satisfaction conditions. I then show how the autonomy thesis helps to answer important questions about the ethics of sexual fantasy. I also argue that the autonomy thesis can claim empirical support from several areas, including (...)
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  5. Jeffrey Hershfield (2005). Is There Life After the Death of the Computational Theory of Mind? Minds and Machines 15 (2):183-194.
    In this paper, I explore the implications of Fodor’s attacks on the Computational Theory of Mind (CTM), which get their most recent airing in The Mind Doesn’t Work That Way. I argue that if Fodor is right that the CTM founders on the global nature of abductive inference, then several of the philosophical views about the mind that he has championed over the years founder as well. I focus on Fodor’s accounts of mental causation, psychological explanation, and intentionality.
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  6. Jeffrey Hershfield (2005). Rule Following and the Background. Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (3):269 - 280.
    . In his work on language John Searle favors an Austinian approach that emphasizes the speech act as the basic unit of meaning and communication, and which sees speaking a language as engaging in a rule-governed form of behavior. He couples this with a strident opposition to cognitivist approaches that posit unconscious rule following as the causal basis of linguistic competence. In place of unconscious rule following Searle posits what he calls the Background, comprised of nonintentional (nonrepresentational) mental phenomena. I (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Hershfield (2004). The Threat of Acquaintance Rape. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):171-173.
  8. Jeffrey Hershfield & Deborah Hansen Soles (2003). Reinflating Truth as an Explanatory Concept. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):32–42.
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  9. Jeffrey Hershfield (2002). A Note on the Possibility of Silicon Brains and Fading Qualia. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (7):25-31.
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  10. Jeffrey Hershfield (2001). Structural Causation and Psychological Explanation. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):249-261.
     
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  11. Jeffrey Hershfield (2001). The Deflationary Theory of Meaning. Philosophia 28 (1-4):191-208.
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  12. Jeffrey Hershfield (1998). Cognitivism and Explanatory Relativity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):505-526.
  13. Jeffrey Hershfield (1998). Lycan on the Subjectivity of the Mental. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):229-38.
    The subjectivity of the mental consists in the idea that there are features of our mental states that are perspectival in that they are accessible only from the first-person point of view. This is held to be a problem for materialist theories of mind, since such theories contend that there is nothing about the mind that cannot be fully described from a third-person (objective) point of view. Lycan suggests a notion of “phenomenal information” that is held to be perspectival in (...)
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  14. Jeffrey Hershfield (1997). Searle's Regimen for Rediscovering the Mind. Dialogue 36 (2):361-374.
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  15. Jeffrey Hershfield (1996). On Taking the High Ground in the Tractatus. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):223-228.
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