Search results for 'Jeffrey K. Beemer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  30
    Jeffrey K. Beemer (2006). Breaching the Theoretical Divide: Reassessing the Ordinary and Everyday in Habermas and Garfinkel. Sociological Theory 24 (1):81 - 104.
    This article argues that Habermas and Garfinkel present complementary perspectives on the dynamics of ordinary language and the ways in which communication is configured and prefigured in interactive settings. Together they provide a basis for thinking about action and its environments not simply in terms of the in situ or formal conditions in isolation from one another, but as extensions of an integrated dependency between the local (indexical) contexts in which interactions occur and the rational (pretheoretical) presuppositions that make such (...)
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  2. Jeffrey K. Beemer (2006). Breaching the Theoretical Divide: Reassessing the Ordinary and Everyday in Habermas and Garfinkel. Sociological Theory 24 (1):81-104.
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  3.  13
    Rudolf Carnap & Richard C. Jeffrey (1972). Book Review:Studies in Inductive Logic and Probability Rudolf Carnap, Richard C. Jeffrey. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 39 (4):549-.
  4. Domenico Costantini, Maria Carla Galavotti & Richard C. Jeffrey (1997). Probability, Dynamics, and Causality Essays in Honour of Richard C. Jeffrey.
     
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  5. Richard C. Jeffrey (1970). Miller David. A Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 59–61.Popper Karl R.. A Comment on Miller's New Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 61–69.Popper Karl R.. A Paradox of Zero Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 141–143.Mackie J. L.. Miller's so-Called Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 144–147.Miller David. On a so-Called so-Called Paradox: A Reply to Professor J. L. Mackie. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 147–149.Bub Jeffrey and Radner Michael. Miller's Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 1 , Pp. 63–67.Miller David. The Straight and Narrow Rule of Induction: A Reply to Dr Bub and Mr Radner. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 2, Pp. 145–151.Rozeboom. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):124-127.
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  6.  2
    Frank Biess (2006). In the House of the Hangman: The Agonies of German Defeat, 1943–1949 by Jeffrey K. Olick. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (1):135–138.
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  7. Pamela Henson (1989). Asa Fitch and the Emergence of American Entomology: With an Entomological Bibliography and a Catalog of Taxonomic Names and Type Specimens by Jeffrey K. Barnes. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 80:539-540.
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  8. J. A. Makowsky (1986). Review: Jeffrey D. Ullman, Principles of Database Systems; David Maier, The Theory of Relational Databases; Ashok K. Chandra, David Harel, Computable Queries for Relational Data Bases. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (4):1079-1084.
  9. J. A. Makowsky (1986). Ullman Jeffrey D.. Principles of Database Systems. Second Edition. Computer Software Engineering Series. Computer Science Press, Rockville, Md., 1982, Vii + 484 Pp.Maier David. The Theory of Relational Databases. Computer Science Press, Rockville, Md., 1983, Xv + 637 Pp.Chandra Ashok K. And Harel David. Computable Queries for Relational Data Bases. Journal of Computer and System Sciences, Vol. 21 , Pp. 156–178. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (4):1079-1084.
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  10. Charity Cannon Willard (2000). The Love Debate Poems of Christine de Pizan: Le livre du debat de deux amans, Le livre des trois jugemens, Le livre du dit de PoissyChristine de Pizan Barbara K. AltmannChristine de Pizan and Medieval French LyricEarl Jeffrey Richards. Speculum 75 (3):679-680.
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  11.  16
    Stephen B. Salter, Daryl M. Guffey & Jeffrey J. McMillan (2001). Truth, Consequences and Culture: A Comparative Examination of Cheating and Attitudes About Cheating Among U.S. And U.K. Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):37-50.
    As Post observes, accounting firms are unique among multinationals. They are more likely than firms in almost any other category to go abroad. They also have less choice in location as their expansion is determined largely by the desired locations of their clients. Given the widespread global presence of such firms, it can be argued that the global audit firm is uniquely at risk from variations in ethical perceptions across nations. This study extends the U.S. accounting literature on determinants of (...)
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  12. K. R. Popper (1967). The Mysteries of Udolpho: A Reply to Professors Jeffrey and Bar-Hillel. Mind 76 (301):103-110.
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  13.  52
    K. Denbigh (1986). KANE, JEFFREY [1984]: Beyond Empiricism: Michael Polanyi Reconsidered. Peter Lang, New York. Pp. 263. (ISBN 0-8204-0118-8). [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (3):375-377.
  14.  8
    Antonis K. Petrides (forthcoming). S.D. Olson Ed. Ancient Comedy and Reception: Essays in Honor of Jeffrey Henderson. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2014. Pp. Xi + 1,086. €299.95. 9781614511250. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies:1-2.
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  15.  2
    Jeffrey Beneker (2013). F. Klotz, K. Oikonomopoulou The Philosopher's Banquet. Plutarch's Table Talk in the Intellectual Culture of the Roman Empire. Pp. Xx + 279. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cased, £55, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-19-958895-4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):86-88.
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  16.  4
    Richard K. Emmerson (2001). Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Ed., The Postcolonial Middle Ages.(New Middle Ages.) New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000. Pp. Vii, 286; 1 Black-and-White Figure. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (4):1014-1016.
  17. Jeffrey Barnouw (1987). K. L. Ketner and C. J. W. Kloesel, Editors. "Peirce, Semeiotic, and Pragmatism. Essays by Max H. Fisch". [REVIEW] New Vico Studies 5:187.
     
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  18. G. M. K. Hunt (1974). Statistical Explanation and Statistical RelevanceWesley C. Salmon R. C. Jeffrey J. G. Greeno. Isis 65 (3):403-404.
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  19. Jeffrey K. Olick (2008). The Ciphered Transits of Collective Memory: Neo-Freudian Impressions. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (1):1-22.
    How do we explain consistencies in discourses about the past that transcend the different interests and experiences of their contributors? This paper explores the the problem of cultural transmission as it appears in Sigmund Freud's Moses and Monotheism, in which Freud claims that that the residues of repressed pasts can be preserved in the life of the collectivity through means other than explicit transmission or even learning processes of imitation and repetition. These ciphered transits of collective memory pose the greatest (...)
     
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  20. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Leibniz's Philosophy of Physics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    entry for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) This entry will attempt to provide a broad overview of the central themes of Leibniz’s philosophy of physics, as well as an introduction to some of the principal arguments and argumentative strategies he used to defend his positions. It tentatively includes sections entitled, The Historical Development of Leibniz’s Physics, Leibniz on Matter, Leibniz’s Dynamics, Leibniz on the Laws of Motion, Leibniz on Space and Time. A bibliography arranged by topic is also included. (...)
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  21.  8
    David P. McCabe, Lisa Geraci, Jeffrey K. Boman, Amanda E. Sensenig & Matthew G. Rhodes (2011). On the Validity of Remember–Know Judgments: Evidence From Think Aloud Protocols. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1625-1633.
    The use of remember–know judgments to assess subjective experience associated with memory retrieval, or as measures of recollection and familiarity processes, has been controversial. In the current study we had participants think aloud during study and provide verbal reports at test for remember–know and confidence judgments. Results indicated that the vast majority of remember judgments for studied items were associated with recollection from study , but this correspondence was less likely for high-confidence judgments . Instead, high-confidence judgments were more likely (...)
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  22.  42
    Jeremy Howick, Paul Glasziou & Jeffrey K. Aronson (2013). Problems with Using Mechanisms to Solve the Problem of Extrapolation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):275-291.
    Proponents of evidence-based medicine and some philosophers of science seem to agree that knowledge of mechanisms can help solve the problem of applying results of controlled studies to target populations (‘the problem of extrapolation’). We describe the problem of extrapolation, characterize mechanisms, and outline how mechanistic knowledge might be used to solve the problem. Our main thesis is that there are four often overlooked problems with using mechanistic knowledge to solve the problem of extrapolation. First, our understanding of mechanisms is (...)
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  23. Jeffrey K. McDonough (2007). Leibniz: Creation and Conservation and Concurrence. The Leibniz Review 17:31-60.
    In this paper I argue that the hoary theological doctrine of divine concurrence poses no deep threat to Leibniz’s views on theodicy and creaturely activity even as those views have been traditionally understood. The first three sections examine respectively Leibniz’s views on creation, conservation and concurrence, with an eye towards showing their sys­tematic compatibility with Leibniz’s theodicy and metaphysics. The fourth section takes up remaining worries arising from the bridging principle that conservation is a continued or continuous creation, and argues (...)
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  24.  35
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2008). Leibniz's Two Realms Revisited. Noûs 42 (4):673-696.
    Leibniz speaks, in a variety of contexts, of there being two realms—a "kingdom of power or efficient causes" and "a kingdom of wisdom or final causes." This essay explores an often overlooked application of Leibniz's famous "two realms doctrine." The first part turns to Leibniz's work in optics for the roots of his view that nature can be seen as being governed by two complete sets of equipotent laws, with one set corresponding to the efficient causal order of the world, (...)
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  25.  29
    Jeffrey K. Mcdonough (2011). The Heyday of Teleology and Early Modern Philosophy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):179-204.
  26. Jeffrey K. McDonough (2007). Leibniz: Creation and Conservation and Concurrence. The Leibniz Review 17:31-60.
    In this paper I argue that the hoary theological doctrine of divine concurrence poses no deep threat to Leibniz’s views on theodicy and creaturely activity even as those views have been traditionally understood. The first three sections examine respectively Leibniz’s views on creation, conservation and concurrence, with an eye towards showing their sys- tematic compatibility with Leibniz’s theodicy and metaphysics. The fourth section takes up remaining worries arising from the bridging principle that conservation is a continued or continuous creation, and (...)
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  27.  10
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2016). Leibniz and the Foundations of Physics: The Later Years. Philosophical Review 125 (1):1-34.
    This essay offers an account of the relationship between extended Leibnizian bodies and unextended Leibnizian monads, an account that shows why Leibniz was right to see intimate, explanatory connections between his studies in physics and his mature metaphysics. The first section sets the stage by introducing a case study from Leibniz's technical work on the strength of extended, rigid beams. The second section draws on that case study to introduce a model for understanding Leibniz's views on the relationship between derivative (...)
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  28. Jeffrey K. McDonough (2010). Leibniz's Optics and Contingency in Nature. Perspectives on Science 18 (4):432-455.
    Leibniz’s mature philosophical understanding of the laws of nature emerges rather suddenly in the late 1670’s to early 1680’s and is signaled by his embrace of three central theses.1 The first, what I’ll call the thesis of Contingency, suggests that the laws of nature are not only contingent, but, in some sense, paradigmatically contingent; they are supposed to provide insight into the very nature of contingency as Leibniz comes to understand it. The second, what I’ll call the thesis of Providence, (...)
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  29.  39
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2008). Berkeley, Human Agency and Divine Concurrentism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 567-590.
    This paper aims to offer a sympathetic reading of Berkeley’s often maligned account of human agency. The first section briefly revisits three options concerning the relationship between human and divine agency available to theistically minded philosophers in the medieval and early modern eras. The second argues that, of those three views, only the position of concurrentism is consistent with Berkeley’s texts. The third section explores Berkeley’s reasons for adopting concurrentism by highlighting three motivating considerations drawn from his larger philosophical system. (...)
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  30. John O'Leary-Hawthorne & Jeffrey K. McDonough (1998). Numbers, Minds, and Bodies: A Fresh Look at Mind-Body Dualism. Philosophical Perspectives 12 (S12):349-371.
    In this essay, we explore a fresh avenue into mind-body dualism by considering a seemingly distant question posed by Frege: "Why is it absurd to suppose that Julius Caesar is a number?". The essay falls into three main parts. In the first, through an exploration of Frege’s Julius Caesar problem, we attempt to expose two maxims applicable to the mind-body problem. In the second part, we draw on those maxims in arguing that “full blown dualism” is preferable to more modest, (...)
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  31.  54
    Jeffrey K. Olick (1999). Collective Memory: The Two Cultures. Sociological Theory 17 (3):333-348.
    What is collective about collective memory? Two different concepts of collective memory compete-one refers to the aggregation of socially framed individual memories and one refers to collective phenomena sui generis-though the difference is rarely articulated in the literature. This article theorizes the differences and relations between individualist and collectivist understandings of collective memory. The former are open to psychological considerations, including neurological and cognitive factors, but neglect technologies of memory other than the brain and the ways in which cognitive and (...)
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  32.  16
    David J. Burns, Jeffrey K. Fawcett & John Lanasa (1994). Business Students' Ethical Perceptions of Retail Situations: A Microcultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):667 - 679.
    Due in part to a growing realization of the importance of the role that retailing plays in the marketing channel, and to the increasing numbers of college graduates being employed by retailers, growing attention is being placed on business students'' ethical perceptions of retailing practices. This study continues this focus by examining the ethical perceptions of collegiate business students attending two different universities which likely represent two different microcultures — conservative evangelical Protestant and secular.The results suggest that ethical perceptions may (...)
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  33.  60
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2009). Leibniz on Natural Teleology and the Laws of Optics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (3):505 - 544.
    This essay examines one of the cornerstones of Leibniz's defense of teleology within the order of nature. The first section explores Leibniz's contributions to the study of geometrical optics, and argues that his "Most Determined Path Principle" or "MDPP" allows him to bring to the fore philosophical issues concerning the legitimacy of teleological explanations by addressing two technical objections raised by Cartesians to non-mechanistic derivations of the laws of optics. The second section argues that, by drawing on laws such as (...)
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  34. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Comments on Roger Ariew's “Descartes and Leibniz as Readers of Suarez”.
    Comments on Roger Ariew’s “Descartes and Leibniz as Readers of Suarez," presented at Franscico Suarez, S.J.: Last Medieval or First Early Modern?, London, Ontario, University of Western Ontario, September 2008.
     
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  35. Jeffrey K. Moore (2013). Stopped in its Tracks: Negative Regulation of the Dynein Motor by the Yeast Protein She1. Bioessays 35 (8):677-682.
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  36. Jeffrey K. McDonough (2000). Defending the Refutation of Idealism. Southwestern Philosophy Review 17 (1):35-44.
    In his Kant and the Claims of Knowledge, Paul Guyer offers an influential reading of Kant’s famous “Refutation of Idealism.” Guyer’s reading has been widely praised as Kantian exegesis but less favorably received as an anti-skeptical line of argument worthy of contemporary interest. In this paper, I focus on defending the general thrust of Guyer’s reading as a response to Cartesian skepticism. The paper falls into two sections. The first section constructs Guyer’s central argument in three steps and gives it (...)
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  37. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Comments on Sukjae Lee's “Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits”.
    Comments on Sukjae Lee's "Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits," presented at Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Baltimore, MD, December 2007.
     
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  38.  45
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2003). A Rosa Multiflora by Any Other Name: Taxonomic Incommensurability and Scientific Kinds. Synthese 136 (3):337 - 358.
    The following paper attempts to explore, criticizeand develop Thomas Kuhn's mostmature – and surprisingly neglected – view ofincommensurability. More specifically, itfocuses on (1) undermining an influential picture ofscientific kinds that lies at the heartof Kuhn's understanding of taxonomic incommensurability;(2) sketching an alternativepicture of scientific kinds that takes advantage ofKuhn's partially developed theory ofdisciplinary matrices; and (3) using these two resultsto motivate revisions to Kuhn'stheory of taxonomic incompatibility, as well as, tothe purported bridge betweentaxonomic incompatibility and some of the traditionalproblems associated (...)
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  39.  13
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2011). Penultimate Draft. Philosophy 35:179-204.
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  40.  45
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2002). Hume's Account of Memory. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):71 – 87.
    This essay attempts to provide a sympathetic reading of Hume’s often tangled discussion of memory in the Treatise. It divides into three main sections. The first section isolates three puzzles in Hume’s account of memory. The second section attempts to show how those puzzles arise as a result of Hume’s understandable failure to recognize a necessary connection between memory and causation. Finally, the third section looks at how the reading of Hume’s account of memory offered in the first two sections (...)
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  41.  61
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2010). Leibniz and the Puzzle of Incompossibility: The Packing Strategy. Philosophical Review 119 (2):135-163.
    Confronting the threat of a Spinozistic necessitarianism, Leibniz insists that not all possible substances are compossible—that they can't all be instantiated together—and thus that not all possible worlds are compossible—that they can't all be instantiated together. While it is easy to appreciate Leibniz's reasons for embracing this view, it has proven difficult to see how his doctrine of incompossibility might be reconciled with the broader commitments of his larger philosophical system. This essay develops, in four sections, a novel solution to (...)
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  42.  29
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2013). Leibniz's Conciliatory Account of Substance. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (6).
    This essay offers an alternative account of Leibniz’s views on substance and fundamental ontology. The proposal is driven by three main ideas. First, that Leibniz’s treatment should be understood against the backdrop of a traditional dispute over the paradigmatic nature substance as well as his own overarching conciliatory ambitions. Second, that Leibniz’s metaphysics is intended to support his conciliatory view that both traditional views of substance are tenable in at least their positive and philosophical respects. Third, that the relationship between (...)
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  43.  4
    Peter Forshaw & Jeffrey K. McDonough (2008). JHP Announcements. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):185-86.
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  44.  11
    Jeffrey K. Hass (1999). The Great Transition: The Dynamics of Market Transitions and the Case of Russia, 1991–1995. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 28 (3):383-424.
  45.  46
    Theodore E. Long & Jeffrey K. Hadden (1985). A Reconception of Socialization. Sociological Theory 3 (1):39-49.
  46.  5
    Jeffrey K. Aronson (2005). Unity From Diversity: The Evidential Use of Anecdotal Reports of Adverse Drug Reactions and Interactions. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (2):195-208.
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  47. Jeffrey K. McDonough (forthcoming). Descartes' "Dioptrics" and Descartes' Optics. In Larry Nolan (ed.), The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Cambridge
    The Dioptrique, often translated as the Optics or, more literally, as the Dioptrics is one of Descartes’ earliest works. Likely begun in the mid to late 1620’s, Descartes refers to it by name in a letter to Mersenne of 25 November 1630 III, 29). Its subject matter partially overlaps with Descartes’ more foundational project The World or Treatise on Light in which he offers a general mechanistic account of the universe including the formation, transmission, and reception of light. Although Galileo’s (...)
     
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  48. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Comments on Andy Egan’s "Second-Order Predication and the Metaphysics of Properties".
    Comments on Andy Egan’s "Second-Order Predication and the Metaphysics of Properties," presented at California State University Long Beach, CA 2003.
     
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  49.  31
    Jeffrey K. McDonough (2011). Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):380-381.
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  50.  1
    Stephen J. Ceci & Jeffrey K. Liker (1986). A Day at the Races: A Study of IQ, Expertise, and Cognitive Complexity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 115 (3):255-266.
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