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  1. Jeffrey Lockwood (2012). Species Are Processes: A Solution to the 'Species Problem' Via an Extension of Ulanowicz's Ecological Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (2):231-260.
    Abstract The ‘species problem’ in the philosophy of biology concerns the nature of species. Various solutions have been proposed, including arguments that species are sets, classes, natural kinds, individuals, and homeostatic property clusters. These proposals parallel debates in ecology as to the ontology and metaphysics of populations, communities and ecosystems. A new solution—that species are processes—is proposed and defended, based on Robert Ulanowicz’s metaphysics of process ecology. As with ecological systems, species can be understood as emergent, autocatalytic systems with propensities (...)
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  2. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (2009). Michael P. Nelson and J. Baird Callicott (Eds): The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (5):493-500.
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  3. Stephan Rp Halloy & Jeffrey A. Lockwood (2005). Ethical Implications of the Laws of Pattern Abundance Distribution. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 7 (2).
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  4. Geoffrey C. Poole, Jason B. Dunham, Druscilla M. Keenan, Sally T. Sauter, Dale A. Mccullough, Christopher Mebane, Jeffrey C. Lockwood, Don A. Essig, Mark P. Hicks, Debra J. Sturdevant, Elizabeth J. Materna, Shelley A. Spalding, John Risley & Marianne Deppman (2004). The Case for Regime-Based Water Quality Standards. BioScience 54 (2):155.
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  5. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (2003). Invasion of the Dollar Snatchers: The Aliens Have Arrived and We Are Paying the Price. BioScience 53 (1):99.
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  6. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1999). Agriculture and Biodiversity: Finding Our Place in This World. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):365-379.
    Agriculture has been recently viewed as the primary destructive force of biodiversity, but the places that produce our food and fiber may also hold the key to saving the richness of life on earth. This argument is based on three fundamental positions. First, it is argued that to value and thereby preserve and restore biodiversity we must begin by employing anthropocentric ethics. While changing our understanding of intrinsic values (i.e., the unconditional values of biodiversity as a state and process in-and-of-itself, (...)
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  7. Dale R. Lockwood & Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1997). Evidence of Self-Organized Criticality in Insect Populations. Complexity 2 (4):49-58.
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  8. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1997). Competing Values and Moral Imperatives: An Overview of Ethical Issues in Biological Control. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):205-210.
    This overview and synthesis of the papers presented in this Special Issue suggests that there is a remarkably rich set of ethical issues having direct relevance to the development and practice of biological control for the management of agricultural pests. The perception and resolution of ethical issues appear to emerge from a set of factors that includes one's ethical viewpoint (anthropocentric or biocentric), agricultural system (industrial or sustainable), economic context (rich or poor), and power structure (expert or public). From this (...)
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  9. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1996). The Ethics of Biological Control: Understanding the Moral Implications of Our Most Powerful Ecological Technology. Agriculture and Human Values 13 (1):2-19.
    A system of environmental ethics recently developed by Lawrence Johnson may be used to analyze the moral implications of biological control. According to this system, entities are morally relevant when they possess well-being interests (i.e., functions or processes that can be better or worse in so far as the entity is concerned). In this formulation of ethical analysis, species and ecosystems are morally relevant because they are not simply aggregates of individuals, so their processes, properties, and well-being interests are not (...)
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  10. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1988). Not to Harm a Fly: Our Ethical Obligations to Insects. Between the Species 4 (3):12.
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  11. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1988). Taking Agricultural Ethics to the Forefront: A Practical Guide to the Organizational and Philosophical Issues. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):96-101.
    If the field of agricultural ethics is to realize its potential and if the agricultural and philosophical communities are to address the impending changes in world food production, there is a need for education in public, governmental, and academic arenas. The development of a symposium on agriculural ethics is an effective method for “raising awareness” of the imminent need for a consolidation of philosophical and agricultural expertise. Based on experience, a series of organizational guidelines and their associated philosophical issues are (...)
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