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  1. Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard, Quantum Physics in Neuroscience and Psychology: A Neurophysical Model of Mind–Brain Interaction.
    Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behaviour generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus, terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g. ‘feeling’, ‘knowing’ and ‘effort’) are not included as primary causal factors. This (...)
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  2. Henry P. Stapp & Jeffrey M. Schwartz, The Implications of Psychological Treatment Effects on Cerebral Function for the Physics of Mind-Brain Interaction.
    The data emerging from the clinical and brain studies described above suggest that, in the case of OCD, there are two pertinent brain mechanisms that are distinguishable both in terms of neuro-dynamics and in terms of the conscious experiences that accompany them. These mechanisms can be characterized, on anatomical and perhaps evolutionary grounds, as a lower-level and a higher-level mechanism. The clinical treatment has, when successful, an activating effect on the higher-level mechanism, and a suppressive effect on the lower-level one.
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  3. Henry P. Stapp & Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Appendix to Schwartz's Paper in J. Consc. Studies.
    The data emerging from the clinical and brain studies described above suggest that, in the case of OCD, there are two pertinent brain mechanisms that are distinguishable both in terms of neuro dynamics and in terms of the conscious experiences that accompany them. These mechanisms can be characterized, on anatomical and perhaps evolutionary grounds, as a lower level and a higher level mechanism. The clinical treatment has, when successful, an activating effect on the higher level mechanism, and a suppressive effect (...)
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  4. Donald D. Price, G. Nicholas Verne & Jeffrey M. Schwartz (2006). Plasticity in Brain Processing and Modulation of Pain. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J.-M. Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 157--333.
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  5. Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard (2004). The Volitional Influence of the Mind on the Brain, with Special Reference to Emotional Self-Regulation. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. 195-238.
  6. Jeffrey M. Schwartz (1999). A Role for Volition and Attention in the Generation of New Brain Circuitry. Toward a Neurobiology of Mental Force. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
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  7. Jeffrey M. Schwartz (1999). First Steps Toward a Theory of Mental Force: PET Imaging of Systematic Cerebral Changes After Psychological Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. In S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & David Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii: The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. Mit Press. 3--111.
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