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  1. Jeffrey Moriarty (forthcoming). Compensation Ethics and Organizational Commitment in Advance. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Jeffrey Moriarty (2013). Smilansky, Arneson, and the Asymmetry of Desert. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):537-545.
    Desert plays an important role in most contemporary theories of retributive justice, but an unimportant role in most contemporary theories of distributive justice. Saul Smilansky has recently put forward a defense of this asymmetry. In this study, I argue that it fails. Then, drawing on an argument of Richard Arneson’s, I suggest an alternative consequentialist rationale for the asymmetry. But while this shows that desert cannot be expected to play the same role in distributive justice that it can play in (...)
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  3. Jeffrey Moriarty (2012). Justice in Compensation: A Defense. Business Ethics 21 (1):64-76.
    Business ethicists have written much about ethical issues in employment. Except for a handful of articles on the very high pay of chief executive officers and the very low pay of workers in overseas sweatshops, however, little has been written about the ethics of compensation. This is prima facie strange. Workers care about their pay, and they think about it in normative terms. This article's purpose is to consider whether business ethicists' neglect of the normative aspects of compensation is justified. (...)
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  4. Robert Kolb & Jeffrey Moriarty (2011). Dialogue - CEO Compensation. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):679-691.
    Must CEOs Be Saints? Contra Moriarty on CEO Abstemiousness by Robert KolbIn this journal, Jeffrey Moriarty argued that CEOs must refuse to accept compensation above the minimum compensation that will induce them to accept and per­form their jobs. Acting otherwise, he maintains, violates the CEO’s fiduciary duty, even for a CEO new to the firm. I argue that Moriarty’s conclusion rests on a failure to adequately distinguish when a person acts as a fiduciary from when she acts on her own (...)
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  5. Jeffrey Moriarty (2011). Does Distributive Justice Pay? Sternberg's Compensation Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):33-48.
    Compensation has received a great deal of attention from social scientists. Characteristically, they have been concerned with the causes and effects of various compensation schemes. By contrast, few theorists have addressed the normative aspects of compensation. An exception is Elaine Sternberg, who offers in Just Business a comprehensive theory of compensation ethics. This paper critically examines her theory, and argues that the justification she gives for it fails. Its failure is instructive, however. The main argument Sternberg gives for her theory (...)
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  6. Joseph Heath, Jeffrey Moriarty & Wayne Norman (2010). Business Ethics and (or as) Political Philosophy. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):427-452.
    There is considerable overlap between the interests of business ethicists and those of political philosophers. Questions about the moral justifiability of the capitalist system, the basis of property rights, and the problem of inequality in the distribution of income have been of central importance in both fields. However, political philosophers have developed, especially over the past four decades, a set of tools and concepts for addressing these questions that are in many ways quite distinctive. Most business ethicists, on the other (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Moriarty (2010). Participation in the Workplace: Are Employees Special? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):373 - 384.
    Many arguments have been advanced in favor of employee participation in firm decision-making. Two of the most influential are the "interest protection argument" and the "autonomy argument." I argue that the case for granting participation rights to some other stakeholders, such as suppliers and community members, is at least as strong, according to the reasons given in these arguments, as the case for granting them to certain employees. I then consider how proponents of these arguments might modify their arguments, or (...)
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  8. Jeffrey Moriarty (2009). How Much Compensation Can CEOs Permissibly Accept? Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):235-250.
    Debates about the ethics of executive compensation are dominated by familiar themes. Many writers consider whether the amount of pay CEOs receive is too large—relative to firm performance, foreign CEO pay, or employee pay. Many others consider whether the process by which CEOs are paid is compromised by weak or self-serving boards of directors. This paper examines the issue from a new perspective. I focus on the duties executives themselves have with respect to their own compensation. I argue that CEOs’ (...)
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  9. Jeffrey Moriarty (2009). Rawls, Self-Respect, and the Opportunity for Meaningful Work. Social Theory and Practice 35 (3):441-459.
    John Rawls says that one of the requirements for stability is “[s]ociety as an employer of last resort” (PLP, lix). He explains: “[t]he lack of . . . the opportunity for meaningful work and occupation is destructive . . . of citizens’ self-respect” (PLP, lix). Rawls implies in these claims that the opportunity for meaningful work is a social basis of self-respect. This constitutes a significant shift in his account of self-respect, one that has been overlooked. I begin by clarifying (...)
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  10. Jeffrey Moriarty (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide for Business Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):873-876.
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  11. Jeffrey Moriarty (2008). Business Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):956-972.
    This essay provides an overview of business ethics. I describe important issues, identify some of the normative considerations animating them, and offer a roadmap of references for those wishing to learn more. I focus on issues in normative business ethics, but discuss briefly the growing body of work in descriptive business ethics. I conclude with a comment on the changing nature of the field.
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  12. Jeffery D. Smith, Denis G. Arnold, Mitchell R. Haney, Nien-hê Hsieh, Alexei Marcoux, Christopher Michaelson, Geoff Moore, Jeffrey Moriarty, Jeffery Smith & Ben Wempe (2008). Normative Theory and Business Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  13. Jeffrey Moriarty (2007). McMahon on Workplace Democracy. Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):339 - 345.
    This paper offers a sympathetic critique of Christopher McMahon’s Authority and Democracy: A General Theory of Government and Management. Although I find fault with some of his arguments, my goal is not to show that these arguments are irreparable, but to highlight issues that deserve further consideration. After defining some terms, first, I raise an objection to McMahon’s rejection of the moral unity of management (MUM) thesis. Second, I draw attention to his “moralization” of the workplace, and examine the role (...)
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  14. Jeffrey Moriarty (2006). Ross on Desert and Punishment. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):231–244.
    W. D. Ross thinks it is good, other things equal, that people get what they deserve. But he denies that "the principle of punishing the vicious, for the sake of doing so, is that on which the state should proceed in its bestowal of punishments." Ross offers two main arguments for this denial: what I call the "scope argument" and the "state's purpose argument." I argue that both fail. In doing so, I illuminate Ross's distinctive views about desert and the (...)
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  15. Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). Do CEOs Get Paid Too Much? Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):257-281.
    In 2003, CEOs of the 365 largest U.S. corporations were paid on average $8 million, 301 times as much as factory workers. This paper asks whether CEOs get paid too much. Appealing to widely recognized moral values, I distinguish three views of justice in wages: the agreement view, the desert view, and the utility view. I argue that, no matter which view is correct, CEOs get paid too much. I conclude by offering two ways CEO pay might be reduced.
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  16. Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). Liberty, Desert, and the Market. [REVIEW] Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):734-735.
    This is a review of Serena Olsaretti's book Liberty, Desert, and the Market.
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  17. Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). On the Relevance of Political Philosophy to Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):455-473.
    The central problems of political philosophy (e.g., legitimate authority, distributive justice) mirror the central problems of businessethics. The question naturally arises: should political theories be applied to problems in business ethics? If a version of egalitarianism is the correct theory of justice for states, for example, does it follow that it is the correct theory of justice for businesses? If states should be democratically governed by their citizens, should businesses be democratically managed by their employees? Most theorists who have considered (...)
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  18. Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). The Epistemological Argument Against Desert. Utilitas 17 (2):205-221.
    Most contemporary political philosophers deny that justice requires giving people what they deserve. According to a familiar anti-desert argument, the influence of genes and environment on people's actions and traits undermines all desert-claims. According to a less familiar – but more plausible – argument, the influence of genes and environment on people's actions and traits undermines some desert-claims (or all desert-claims to an extent). But, it says, we do not know which ones (or to what extent). This article examines this (...)
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  19. Jeffrey Moriarty (2003). Against the Asymmetry of Desert. Noûs 37 (3):518–536.
    Desert plays a central role in most contemporary theories of retributive justice, but little or no role in most contemporary theories of distributive justice. This asymmetric treatment of desert is prima facie strange. I consider several popular arguments against the use of desert in distributive justice, and argue that none of them can be used to justify the asymmetry.
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  20. Jeffrey Moriarty (2002). Desert and Distributive Justice in a Theory of Justice. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (1):131–143.
    Some writers think that John Rawls rejects desert as a distributive criterion because he thinks that people are not capable of deserving anything. I argue that Rawls does not think this, and that he rejects desert because he thinks that we cannot tell what people deserve. I then offer a criticism of Rawls's rejection of desert based on its correct interpretation.
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