12 found
Sort by:
  1. Jeffrey Nesteruk (forthcoming). Corporate Speech as Commercial Speech: A Response to Mayer's Nike V. Kasky Analysis. Business Ethics Quarterly.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jeffrey Nesteruk (forthcoming). The Moral Status of the Corporation: Comments on an Inquiry. Business Ethics Quarterly.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jeffrey Nesteruk (2007). Corporate Speech as Commercial Speech. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):97-103.
    Raising the issue of corporate moral agency in our examination of the morality of corporate speech is important for two fundamentalreasons. Each reason suggests we exercise caution in conflating corporations and individuals as the law often does. First, raising the issue of corporate moral agency is important to the aim of providing a framework for ethically evaluating corporate speech. It is tempting to proceed as if the nature of corporate speech is self-evident. But this is hardly the case. Corporations are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jeffrey Nesteruk (2006). The Moral Aspirations of the Law. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1):103-108.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jeffrey Nesteruk (1999). Evaluating the Moral Creativity of the Law. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):689-692.
    The question of legal optimism presupposes the development of a normative stance regarding the law’s evolution. Only with a sense of where the law should be going can one be optimistic—or pessimistic for that matter—regarding its development. Thus, the possibility of legal optimism depends on disclosing the normative stance toward the law’s evolution suggested by the law’s moral creativity. What we need is a legal theory for civil society analogous to our legal theory of the market.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jeffrey Nesteruk (1999). Reimagining the Law. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):603-617.
    Legal issues have long been a prominent part of the discourse of business ethics. This widespread attention to legal questions within business ethics arises primarily because specific legal issues are as a practical matter often intertwined with prominent ethical issues occurring in the workplace. Many of the central issues of business ethics—issues such as whistle blowing, insider trading, and workplace privacy—have significant legal dimensions.But this widespread attention to specific legal issues obscures a more significant deficiency within business ethics. This deficiency (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey Nesteruk (1995). Law and the Virtues. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):361-369.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1993). Conceptions of the Corporation and Ethical Decision Making in Business. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 12 (1):73-89.
  9. Peter A. French, Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1992). Corporations in the Moral Community. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers.
  10. Jeffrey Nesteruk (1992). The Moral Status of the Corporation. Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (4):461-463.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1992). Teaching Ethics in Business Law Courses. In Joshua Laverson (ed.), Teaching Resource Bulletin, no. 2. American Bar Association (Commission on College and University Nonprofessional Legal Studies).
    The article begins with a view of recent developments in the discipline of business law. A model useful in the study of business ethics is presented. Business ethics is the philosophical examination of the body of values and conceptions that influence business decision making as well as being pervasive components of the social environment in which businesses operate. Our model is a four-part framework for approaching business ethics which is sensitive to its implications for business law. The model's four parts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jeffrey Nesteruk (1991). The Ethical Significance of Corporate Law. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):723 - 727.
    Corporate legal scholarship has failed in fundamental ways to grasp the ethical significance of corporate law and policy. While the broader economic and social consequences of particular legal developments are routinely debated, too little reflection is given to how such developments affect the moral quality of individual lives within the corporate hierarchy. What is needed is a framework for illuminating the interaction between developments in corporate legal doctrine and the ethical choices of corporate managers. The ethical significance of corporate law (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation