1. Jeffrey P. Ebert (2011). Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Keith M. Murphy and C. Jason Throop, Eds. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2010. Vi+227 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 39 (1):1-4.
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  2. Jeffrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). Mistaking Randomness for Free Will. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):965-971.
    Belief in free will is widespread. The present research considered one reason why people may believe that actions are freely chosen rather than determined: they attribute randomness in behavior to free will. Experiment 1 found that participants who were prompted to perform a random sequence of actions experienced their behavior as more freely chosen than those who were prompted to perform a deterministic sequence. Likewise, Experiment 2 found that, all else equal, the behavior of animated agents was perceived to be (...)
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  3. Jeffrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner (2010). Time Warp: Authorship Shapes the Perceived Timing of Actions and Events. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):481-489.
    It has been proposed that inferring personal authorship for an event gives rise to intentional binding, a perceptual illusion in which one’s action and inferred effect seem closer in time than they otherwise would . Using a novel, naturalistic paradigm, we conducted two experiments to test this hypothesis and examine the relationship between binding and self-reported authorship. In both experiments, an important authorship indicator – consistency between one’s action and a subsequent event – was manipulated, and its effects on binding (...)
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