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  1. Jeffrey P. Fry (2012). On Playing With Emotion. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (1):26-36.
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  2. Jeffrey P. Fry (2012). The Ethics of Sports Coaching. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):393-396.
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume 6, Issue 3, Page 393-396, August 2012.
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  3. Jeffrey P. Fry (2011). Making A Comeback. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (1):4-20.
    In this paper I explore the nature, varieties, causes and meanings of comebacks related to sport. I argue that comebacks have an axiological dimension, and that the best comebacks involve personal growth. I attempt to show that a major reason that comebacks connected to sport are often inspiring is that we are all in need of a comeback at some point in our lives. When improbable comebacks occur in the world of sport, they expand our sense of possibility.
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  4. Jeffrey P. Fry (2011). On the Supposed Duty to Try One's Hardest in Sports. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (2):1-10.
    It is a common refrain in sports discourse that one should try one's hardest in sports, or some other variation on this theme. In this paper I argue that there is no generalized duty to try one's hardest in sports, and that the claim that one should do so is ambiguous. Although a number of factors point in the direction of my conclusion, particularly salient is the claim that, in the end, the putative requirement is too stringent for creatures like (...)
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  5. Jeffrey P. Fry (2009). Living Like There's No Tomorrow. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):79-88.
    This paper explores whether resolving to "live like there's no tomorrow" would be conducive to living life to the fullest. While there is much to commend a life lived with a sense of urgency, I conclude that living like there's no tomorrow, in the final analysis, is neither advisable, nor realizable. In its place I suggest a life lived in mindfulness of the transitory and uncertain nature of our lives.
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  6. Jeffrey P. Fry (2007). 100 Heroes: People in Sports Who Make This a Better World. By Richard Lapchick, with Jessica Bartter, Jennifer Brenden, Stacy Martin, Drew Tyler, and Brian Wright. Published 2005 by NCAS Publishing, Orlando, FL. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):211-213.
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  7. Jeffrey P. Fry (2007). Running Religiously. In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub..
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  8. Jeffrey P. Fry (2007). Why Sports Morally Matter. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):378 – 380.
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  9. Jeffrey P. Fry (2004). Sports and “The Fragility of Goodness”. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (1):34-46.
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  10. Jeffrey P. Fry (2001). Coaches' Accountability for Pain and Suffering in the Athletic Body. Professional Ethics 9 (3/4):9-26.
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  11. Jeffrey P. Fry (2000). Coaching a Kingdom of Ends. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):51-62.
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