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  1.  11
    Jeffrey Petts (2015). Feeling Beauty: The Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (4):515-518.
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  2.  63
    Jeffrey Petts (2004). Interpreting Art: Reflecting, Wondering, and Responding. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):197-199.
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  3.  50
    Jeffrey Petts (2003). Beyond Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):93-95.
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  4.  26
    Jeffrey Petts (2000). Aesthetic Experience and the Revelation of Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (1):61-71.
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  5.  15
    Jeffrey Petts (2008). Good Work and Aesthetic Education: William Morris, the Arts and Crafts Movement, and Beyond. Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):30-45.
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  6.  1
    Jeffrey Petts (2015). Currie, Greg, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin, and Jon Robson, Eds. Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. Oxford University Press, 2014, 272 Pp., £40,00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):469-472.
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  7.  4
    Jeffrey Petts (2012). The Necessity of Art, Ernst Fischer, with an Introduction by John Berger, London: Verso, 2010. Historical Materialism 20 (2):195-209.
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  8.  1
    Jeffrey Petts (1999). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (1):88-90.
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  9. Jeffrey Petts (2016). The Cultural Promise of The Aesthetic by Monique Roelofs. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):119-123.
    The central claim of Monique Roelofs’s wide-ranging examination of the aesthetic is that it “hold[s] out the promise of a shared culture... people and objects [connected] in flourishing collective and material bonds”. Roelofs acknowledges Kant’s and Hume’s commitment to shared human faculties that allow judgements of taste “to attain intersubjective validity”; but her argument quickly develops from this “promise” to one with social and political consequences—of a harmonious and egalitarian society—and to radically different theoretical formulations and conclusions. Roelofs then also (...)
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