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Profile: Jeffrie Murphy (Arizona State University)
  1. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2013). A Failed Refutation and an Insufficiently Developed Insight in Hart's Law, Liberty, and Morality. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):419-434.
    H. L. A. Hart, in his classic book Law, Liberty, and Morality, is unsuccessful in arguing that James Fitzjames Stephen’s observations about the role of vice in criminal sentencing have no relevance to a more general defense of legal moralism. He does, however, have a very important insight about the special significance of sexual liberty.
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  2. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2012). Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion. OUP USA.
    This collection of essays presents Jeffrie G. Murphy's most recent ideas on punishment, forgiveness, and the emotions of resentment, shame, guilt, remorse, love, and jealousy. In Murphy's view, conscious rationales of principle -- such as crime control or giving others what in justice they deserve -- do not always drive our decisions to punish or condemn others for wrongdoing. Sometimes our decisions are in fact driven by powerful and rather base emotions such as malice, spite, envy, and cruelty. But our (...)
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  3. Steven M. Cahn & Jeffrie G. Murphy (2009). Happiness and Immorality. In , Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2009). The Case of Dostoevsky's General. The Monist 92 (4):556-582.
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  5. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2006). Legal Moralism and Retribution Revisited. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
    This is a slightly revised text of Jeffrie G. Murphy’s Presidential Address delivered to the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, in March 2006. In the essay the author reconsiders two positions he had previously defended—the liberal attack on legal moralism and robust versions of the retributive theory of punishment—and now finds these positions much more vulnerable to legitimate attack than he had previously realized. In the first part of the essay, he argues that the use of Mill’s liberal harm principle (...)
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  6. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2006). Review of William Ian Miller, Eye for an Eye. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
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  7. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2005). Getting Even: Forgiveness and Its Limits. OUP USA.
    We have all been victims of wrongdoing. Forgiving that wrongdoing is one of the staples of current pop psychology dogma; it is seen as a universal prescription for moral and mental health in the self-help and recovery section of bookstores. At the same time, personal vindictiveness as a rule is seen as irrational and immoral. In many ways, our thinking on these issues is deeply inconsistent; we value forgiveness yet at the same time now use victim-impact statements to argue for (...)
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  8. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2004). The Unhappy Immoralist. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):11–13.
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  9. Sharon Lamb & Jeffrie G. Murphy (eds.) (2002). Before Forgiving: Cautionary Views of Forgiveness in Psychotherapy. OUP USA.
    For psychologists and psychotherapists, the notion of forgiveness has been enjoying a substantial vogue. For their patients, it holds the promise of "moving on" and healing emotional wounds. The forgiveness of others - and of one's self - would seem to offer the kind of peace that psychotherapy alone has never been able to provide. In this volume, psychologist Sharon Lamb and philosopher Jeffrie Murphy argue that forgiveness has been accepted as a therapeutic strategy without serious, critical examination. They intend (...)
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  10. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2002). Jealousy, Shame, and the Rival. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):143 - 150.
    This essay is a critique of the two chapters on jealousy in Jerome Neu's book A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. The rival — as anobject of both fear and hatred — is of central importance in romantic jealousy, but it is here argued that the role of the rival cannot be fully understood in Neu's account of jealousy and that shame (not noted by Neu) must be seen as central to the concept of jealousy if the role of the (...)
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  11. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2000). Norman S. Care, Living with One's Past: Personal Fates and Moral Pain:Living with One's Past: Personal Fates and Moral Pain. Ethics 110 (2):405-407.
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  12. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1999). Shame Creeps Through Guilt and Feels Like Retribution. Law and Philosophy 18 (4):327 - 344.
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  13. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1998). Jean Hampton on Immorality, Self-Hatred, and Self-Forgiveness. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):215-236.
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  14. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1992). Bias Crimes: What Do Haters Deserve? Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):20-23.
  15. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1991). Gorr on Actus Reus. Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (1):18-19.
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  16. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1991). Retributive Hatred: An Essay on Criminal Liability and the Emotions. In R. G. Frey & Christopher W. Morris (eds.), Liability and Responsibility: Essays in Law and Morals. Cambridge University Press. 360.
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  17. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1991). Review: Injustice and Misfortune. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 10 (4):433 - 446.
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  18. Jeffrie G. Murphy & Neil MacCormick (1991). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 10 (4):433-452.
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  19. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1990). Getting Even: The Role of the Victim. Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (02):209-.
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  20. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1990). Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Westview Press.
    In this revised edition, two distinguished philosophers have extended and strengthened the most authoritative text available on the philosophy of law and jurisprudence. While retaining their comprehensive coverage of classical and modern theory, Murphy and Coleman have added new discussions of the Critical Legal Studies movement and feminist jurisprudence, and they have strengthened their treatment of natural law theory, criminalization, and the law of torts. The chapter on law and economics remains the best short introduction to that difficult, controversial, and (...)
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  21. Jeffrie G. Murphy & Jean Hampton (1990). [Book Review] Forgiveness and Mercy. [REVIEW] Ethics 100.
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  22. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1988). A Rejoinder to Morris. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):20-22.
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  23. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1988). Forgiveness, Mercy, and the Retributive Emotions. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):3-15.
  24. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1987). Kantian Autonomy and Divine Commands. Faith and Philosophy 4 (3):276-281.
    James Rachels has argued that a morally autonomous person (in Kant’s sense) could not consistently accept the authority of divine commands. Against Rachels, this essay argues (a) that the Kantian concept of moral autonomy is to be analyzed in terms of an agent’sresponsiveness to the best available moral reasons and (b) that it is simply question-begging against divine command theory to assume that such commands could not count as the best moral reasons available to an agent.
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  25. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1986). Mercy and Legal Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (01):1-.
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  26. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1986). Meaningfulness and the Doctrine of Eternal Return. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2):61-66.
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  27. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1986). The Justice of Economics. Philosophical Topics 14 (2):195-210.
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  28. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1985). Retributivism, Moral Education, and the Liberal State. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (1):3-11.
  29. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1984). Justifying Departures From Equal Treatment. Journal of Philosophy 81 (10):587-593.
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  30. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1984). The Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Rowman & Allanheld.
     
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  31. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1982). Forgiveness and Resentment. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):503-516.
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  32. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1982). Evolution, Morality, and the Meaning of Life. Rowman and Littlefield.
  33. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1980). Blackmail. The Monist 63 (2):156-171.
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  34. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1978). Hume and Kant on the Social Contract. Philosophical Studies 33 (1):65 - 79.
    The central or dominant intellectual model which provided the structure of social and political thought in the 18th century was the "social contract". Both hume and kant felt obliged to assess it carefully-Hume coming out an opponent and kant a supporter of the model. This opposition is particularly interesting for the following reason: hume's attack on social contract theory is directed primarily against hobbes and locke, And it is interesting to see if post-Humean social contract theories (especially kant's and that (...)
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  35. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1976). Rationality and the Fear of Death. The Monist 59 (2):187-203.
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  36. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1973). An Introduction to Moral and Social Philosophy. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    Plato. Crito.--Mill, J. S. Utilitarianism.--Rawls, J. Two concepts of rules.--Kant, I. Fundamental principles of the metaphysic of morals.--Rawls, J. Justice as fairness.--Benn, S. I. and Peters, R. S. Society and types of social regulation.--Hobbes, T. Leviathan, abridged.--Hayek, F. A. The principles of a liberal social order.--Marx, K. Alienation and its overcoming in Communism.--Lukes, S. Alienation and anomie.--Garver, N. What violence is.--Zinn, H. The force of nonviolence.--Caudwell, C. Pacifism and violence; a study in bourgeois ethics.--Bennett, J. Whatever the consequences.--Foot, P. Abortion (...)
     
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  37. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1973). Marxism and Retribution. Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (3):217-243.
  38. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1973). The Killing of the Innocent. The Monist 57 (4):527-550.
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  39. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1972). Moral Death: A Kantian Essay on Psychopathy. Ethics 82 (4):284-298.
  40. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1971). Involuntary Acts and Criminal Liability. Ethics 81 (4):332-342.
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  41. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1971). Three Mistakes About Retributivism. Analysis 31 (5):166 - 169.
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  42. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1970/1994). Kant: The Philosophy of Right. Mercer University Press.
  43. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1970). Violence and the Rule of Law. Ethics 80 (4):319-321.
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  44. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1969). A Paradox in Locke's Theory of Natural Rights. Dialogue 8 (02):256-271.
  45. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1969). Kalin on the Categorical Imperative. Ethics 79 (2):163-164.
    The article is a critical reply to jesse kalin's "a note on singer and kant" ("ethics", 1968). Kalin had argued that kant's categorical imperative entails absurdly counterintuitive consequences--E.G. That it is wrong to punish people. Against kalin, It is argued that such consequences are not entailed by the categorical imperative if it is properly interpreted. A proper interpretation involves, For example, Distinguishing the categorical imperative's function as a criterion for imperfect duties from its function as a criterion for perfect duties.
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  46. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1968). Allegiance and Lawful Government. Ethics 79 (1):56-69.
  47. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1967). Kant's Concept of a Right Action. The Monist 51 (4):574-598.
  48. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1967). Law Logic. Ethics 77 (3):193-201.
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  49. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1966). Another Look at Legal Moralism. Ethics 77 (1):50-56.
    The idea that immoral conduct ought to be criminalized is already often rejected, But not for precisely the right reasons. Victim-Less crimes ought to be decriminalized not (as h l a hart and j s mill argue) because it is immoral to make crimes of them, But because it is contrary to the nature of the criminal law itself. Acts of private immorality do not violate the rights of the participants; thus they cannot be crimes because there is no crime (...)
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