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  1. Mark A. Wilson, Julie Hanlon Rubio, Lisa Tessman, Mary M. Doyle Roche, James F. Keenan, Margaret Urban Walker, Jamie Schillinger, Jean Porter, Jennifer A. Herdt & Edmund N. Santurri (2014). Virtue and the Moral Life: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives. Lexington Books.
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  2. Jennifer A. Herdt (2013). Redeeming the Acquired Virtues. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):727-740.
    The probing readings of Putting On Virtue offered by Sheryl Overmyer, Darlene Weaver, and James Foster provide a welcome opportunity for further reflection on key questions: Was Aquinas really concerned with the status of pagan virtues? Can we properly understand a thinker whose driving questions are not the same as our own without taking up a stance of pure deference? Can an inquiry into hyper-Augustinian anxiety over acquired virtue assist us in arriving at an account of positive self-regard? Can an (...)
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  3. Jennifer A. Herdt (2012). David Hume: A Dissertation on the Passions; The Natural History of Religion. Hume Studies 36 (2):233-235.
    The present volume is the fifth out of eight total projected for the Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume. Its editor, Tom Beauchamp, is one of the general editors of the Clarendon Hume, together with David Fate Norton and M. A. Stewart. Beauchamp served as the editor for the Clarendon editions of An Enquiry concerning the Principle of Morals (1998) and An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (2000), both of which have garnered critical acclaim. Like the previous volumes, this (...)
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  4. Jennifer A. Herdt (2012). Hauerwas Among the Virtues. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):202-227.
    Despite the fact that Stanley Hauerwas has not taken up many of the topics normally associated with virtue ethics, has explicitly distanced himself from the enterprise known as “virtue ethics,” and throughout his career has preferred other categories of analysis, ranging from character and agency to practices and liturgy, it is nevertheless clear that his work has had a deep and transformative impact on the recovery of virtue within Christian ethics, and that this impact has largely to do with the (...)
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  5. Jennifer A. Herdt (2011). Democracy's Reasons. Process Studies 40 (2):307-314.
  6. Jennifer A. Herdt (2010). David Hume. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 36 (2):233-235.
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  7. Jennifer A. Herdt (2009). Book Reviews Baier, Annette . Death and Character: Further Reflections on Hume . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008. Pp. Xi+288. $39.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (1):146-150.
  8. Jennifer A. Herdt (2009). Christian Humility, Courtly Civility, and the Code of the Streets. Modern Theology 25 (4):541-561.
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  9. Jennifer A. Herdt (2009). Rain on the Just and the Unjust: The Challenge of Indiscriminate Divine Love. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (1):34-47.
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  10. Jennifer A. Herdt (2008). Rediscovering the Natural Law in Reformed Theological Ethics – By Stephen J. Grabill. Modern Theology 24 (1):129-132.
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  11. Jennifer A. Herdt (2004). Historicism, Moral Judgment, and the Good Life. Teaching New Histories of Philosophy:197-203.
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  12. Jennifer A. Herdt (2004). The Endless Construction of Charity: On Milbank's Critique of Political Economy. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):301 - 324.
    In "Theology and Social Theory", John Milbank critiques Scottish Enlightenment political economy and its attendant descriptive moral philosophy for "de-ethicizing" human action. A closer look at the development of theoretical understandings of sympathy, however, shows that instinct did not ultimately displace virtue. Moreover, a survey of practical responses to poverty calls into question the claim that political economy obliterated the Christian sphere of public charity. Many of the innovations Milbank criticizes as de-ethicizing in fact reflect serious efforts to absorb into (...)
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  13. Jennifer A. Herdt (2001). The Invention of Modern Moral Philosophy: A Review of "The Invention of Autonomy" by J. B. Schneewind. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):145 - 173.
    This review essay assesses the significance of J. B. Schneewind's "The Invention of Autonomy" for the history of moral thought in general and for religious ethics in particular. The essay offers an overview of Schneewind's complex argument before critically discussing his four central themes: the primacy of Immanuel Kant, the fundamentality of conflict, the insufficiency of virtue, and community with God. Whereas Schneewind argues that an impasse between modern natural law and perfectionist ethics revealed irresolvable tensions within Christian ethics and (...)
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  14. Jennifer A. Herdt (2001). The Rise of Sympathy and the Question of Divine Suffering. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):367 - 399.
    Seventeenth-century Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth, writing just at the time when the concept of sympathy was moving from the realm of magic to that of ethics, argued that God must be understood as having a vital sympathy with suffering human beings. Yet while Cudworth invoked sympathy in an attempt to capture God's intimate relation with creation, in fact, it served as a principle of mediation that tended either to collapse God into the world or to distance God from the world. (...)
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  15. Jennifer A. Herdt (2000). Religious Ethics, History, and the Rise of Modern Moral Philosophy - Focus Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):167-188.
    In this introduction to a cluster of three articles on eighteenth-century ethics written by Mark Larrimore, John Bowlin, and Mark Cladis, the author maintains that although the broad narrative tracing the emergence of a religiously neutral or naturalistic moral language in the eighteenth century is a familiar one, many central questions concerning this development remain unanswered and require further historical study. Against those who contend that historical study is antecedent to, but not part of, the proper substance of religious ethics, (...)
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  16. Jennifer A. Herdt (1998). Free Choice, Self-Referential Arguments, and the New Natural Law. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (4):581-600.
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  17. Jennifer A. Herdt (1997). Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores Hume's concern with the destructiveness of religious factions and his efforts to develop, in his moral philosophy, a solution to factional conflict. Sympathy and the related capacity to enter into foreign points of view are crucial to the neutralization of religious zeal and the naturalization of ethics. Jennifer Herdt suggests that Hume's preoccupation with religious faction is the key which reveals the unity of his varied philosophical, aesthetic, political, and historical works.
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