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  1. Jennifer A. Parks (forthcoming). Home-Based Care, Technology, and the Maintenance of Selves. HEC Forum:1-15.
    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also (...)
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  2. Jennifer A. Parks (2010). Care Ethics and the Global Practice of Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 24 (7):333-340.
    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy into the (...)
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  3. Jennifer A. Parks (2010). Lifting the Burden of Women's Care Work: Should Robots Replace the "Human Touch"? Hypatia 25 (1):100 - 120.
    This paper treats the political and ethical issues associated with the new caretaking technologies. Given the number of feminists who have raised serious concerns about the future of care work in the United States, and who have been critical of the degree to which society "free rides" on women's caretaking labor, I consider whether technology may provide a solution to this problem. Certainly, if we can create machines and robots to take on particular tasks, we may lighten the care burden (...)
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  4. Jennifer A. Parks (2005). Book Review: Mary Mahowald. GENES, WOMEN, EQUALITY. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):200-202.
  5. Jennifer A. Parks (2005). Genes, Women, and Equality (Review). Hypatia 20 (1):214-217.
  6. Jennifer A. Parks (2005). Genes, Women, Equality (Review). Hypatia 20 (2):200-202.
  7. Jennifer A. Parks (2004). Grin and Bare It. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):45-53.
    This paper considers the issues surrounding women’s bare-breastedness and breastfeeding in public. I argue that women should have equal freedoms with men to bare their breasts in public, but not for the reasons commonly cited Proponents of “the public breast” tend to focus on the similarities between women’s and men’s breasts; I argue that the sameness versus difference debate is unhelpful in resolving this question. As I argue, women’s breasts differ from men’s in significant ways, and by dismissing these differences (...)
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  8. Jennifer A. Parks (2003). Envisioning a Kinder, Gentler World: On Recognition and Remuneration for Care Workers. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (6):489-499.
    In this paper, I argue that thestatus of those who take care of persons withdisabilities, and persons with disabilities,are inextricably linked. That is, devaluingthe status of one necessarily devalues that ofthe other. Persons with disabilities and thosewho help care for them must form an alliance toadvance their common interests. This alliancecan gain insight and inspiration from feministthought insofar as caretaking is literallylinked to problems of the representation ofcaretaking as ``women's work,'' and morephilosophically, by borrowing from the toolboxof feminist social, political, (...)
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  9. Jennifer A. Parks (2000). Why Gender Matters to the Euthanasia Debate: On Decisional Capacity and the Rejection of Women's Death Requests. Hastings Center Report 30 (1):30-36.
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  10. Jennifer A. Parks (1999). Ethical Androcentrism and Maternal Substance Addiction. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):165-175.
    In this paper, I argue that bioethics suffers from a masculinist approach-what I call “ethical androcentrism.” Despite the genesis of other legitimate approaches to ethics (such as feminist, narrative, and communicative ethics), this masculinist tradition persists. The first part of my paper concerns the problem of ethical androcentrism, and how it is manifest in our typical ways of “doing” bioethics (as teachers, ethicists, policymakers, and medical practitioners). After arguing that bioethics suffers from a masculinist ethic, I consider the case of (...)
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  11. Jennifer A. Parks (1999). On the Use of IVF by Post-Menopausal Women. Hypatia 14 (1):77-96.
    : Nonfeminist accounts of post-menopausal IVF reject the practice on four main grounds: 1) scarcity of resources; 2) fairness; 3) the "inappropriateness" of post-menopausal motherhood; and 4) concerns for orphaned children. I argue that these grounds are insufficient for denying post-menopausal women IVF access. I then suggest that a feminist evaluation of the practice is more compelling; ultimately, however, we have no strong grounds for a policy denying post-menopausal women access to this technology.
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  12. Jennifer A. Parks (1998). A Contextualized Approach to Patient Autonomy Within the Therapeutic Relationship. Journal of Medical Humanities 19 (4):299-311.
    Some authors have advanced a contractual model to protect patient autonomy within the therapeutic relationship. Such a conception of the physician–patient relationship is intended to serve both parties by respecting patients' choices and preserving physician integrity. I critique this contractual view and offer an alternative, feminist contextualized approach to autonomy within the therapeutic relationship. This approach places the physician-patient relationship within a larger social context, and indicates the many social inequalities that render insupportable the notion of physicians and patients as (...)
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  13. Jennifer A. Parks (1996). On the Call for a Feminist Notion of Autonomy in Biomedical Ethics. Dissertation, Mcmaster University (Canada)
    In this thesis I argue that the received view of autonomy is insufficient for both biomedical ethics and feminist theory. I begin with an examination of the received view of autonomy; I then indicate the way in which this view of autonomy has been applied to health care ethics. A feminist relational approach to autonomy is explored: I argue that such an approach has many strengths in that it gives us a more accurate picture of the self-in-relationships and that it (...)
     
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