Search results for 'Jennifer C. Rubenstein' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christian Barry, Michael Davis, Peter K. Dews, Aaron V. Garrett, Yusuf Has, Bill E. Lawson, Val Plumwood, Joshua Preiss, Jennifer C. Rubenstein & Avital Simhony (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (3):734-741.score: 290.0
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  2. Jennifer C. Rubenstein (2013). The Misuse of Power, Not Bad Representation: Why It Is Beside the Point That No One Elected Oxfam. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (1).score: 290.0
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  3. Mary C. MacLeod & Eric M. Rubenstein, Universals.score: 140.0
    Universals are a class of mind independent entities, usually contrasted with individuals (or so-called “particulars”), postulated to ground and explain relations of qualitative identity and resemblance among individuals. Individuals are said to be similar in virtue of sharing universals. An apple and a ruby are both red, for example, and their common redness results from sharing a universal. If they are both red at the same time, the universal, red, must be in two places at once. This makes universals (...)
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  4. Jennifer Rubenstein (2007). Distribution and Emergency. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (3):296–320.score: 120.0
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  5. Jennifer Rubenstein (2009). Humanitarian Ngos' Duties of Justice. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (4):524-541.score: 120.0
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  6. Jennifer Rubenstein, Accountability in an Unequal World.score: 120.0
    According to the standard model of accountability, holding another actor accountable entails sanctioning that actor if it fails to fulfill its obligations without a justification or excuse. Less powerful actors therefore cannot hold more powerful actors accountable, because they cannot sanction more powerful actors. Because inequality appears unlikely to disappear soon, there is a pressing need for second-best forms of accountability: forms that are feasible under conditions of inequality, but deliver as many of the benefits of standard accountability as possible. (...)
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  7. Jennifer Rubenstein (2005). Fiona Terry, Condemned to Repeat? The Paradox of Humanitarian Action, and Brian D. Lepard, Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention: A Fresh Legal Approach Based on Fundamental Ethical Principles in International Law and World Religions:Condemned to Repeat? The Paradox of Humanitarian Action;Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention: A Fresh Legal Approach Based on Fundamental Ethical Principles in International Law and World Religions. Ethics 115 (4):850-853.score: 120.0
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  8. Jennifer Rubenstein (2007). Ethics in Action: The Ethical Challenges of International Human Rights Nongovernmental Organizations - Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Jean-Marc Coicaud. Ethics and International Affairs 21 (3):385–387.score: 120.0
  9. Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon & Michael J. Zinaman (1995). Germ-Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (03):316-.score: 120.0
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  10. Jennifer Rubenstein (2007). Ethics in Action: The Ethical Challenges of International Human Rights Nongovernmental Organizations, Daniel A. Bell and Jean-Marc Coicaud, Eds.(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 334 Pp., $34.99 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 21 (3):385-387.score: 120.0
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  11. Jay Rubenstein (2003). Jeff Rider, God's Scribe: The Historiographical Art of Galbert of Bruges. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2001. Pp. Viii, 360. $59.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):595-597.score: 120.0
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  12. Jay Rubenstein (2014). Miri Rubin and Walter Simons, Eds., Christianity in Western Europe C. 1100–C. 1500. (The Cambridge History of Christianity 4.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. Xxii, 577; 4 Black-and-White Figures. $189. ISBN: 9780521811064. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):239-240.score: 120.0
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  13. Jennifer Rubenstein (forthcoming). The Ethics of INGO Advocacy. Ethics.score: 120.0
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  14. Helen Watt (1999). Response to “Germ Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation” by Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon, and Michael J. Zinaman (CQ Vol. 4, No. 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (01):88-96.score: 39.0
    Germ-line therapy has long been regarded with great caution both by scientists and by ethicists. Even those who do not reject germ-line therapy in principle have tended to reject it in practice as carrying unacceptable risks in our current state of knowledge. For this reason, a recent paper by Rubenstein, Thomasma, Shon, and Zinaman is unusual in putting forward a serious proposal for the use of germ-line therapy in the foreseeable future.
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  15. Imre Szebik (1999). Response to “Germ Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation” by Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon, and Michael J. Zinaman (CQ Vol 4, No 3) Altering the Mitochondrial Genome: Is It Just a Technical Issue? [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):369-374.score: 36.0
    Technical, ethical, and social questions of germ-line gene interventions have been widely discussed in the literature. The majority of these discussions focus on planned interventions executed on the nuclear DNA (nDNA). However, human cells also contain another set of genes that is the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). As the characteristics of the mtDNA grossly differ from those of nDNA, so do the social, ethical, psychological, and safety considerations of possible interventions on this part of the genetic substance.
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  16. Matthew D. Bacchetta & Gerd Richter (1996). Responses and Dialogue: Response to “Germ-Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation” by Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon, and Michael J. Zinaman (CQ Vol 4, No 3.). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (03):450-.score: 36.0
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  17. James W. O'Leary (1982). Breaking Ground in Crop Improvement Genetic Improvement of Crops: Emergent Techniques Irwin Rubenstein Burle Gengenbach Ronald L. Phillips C. Edward Green. Bioscience 32 (7):624-624.score: 36.0
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  18. Imre Szebik (1999). Response to “Germ Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation” by Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon, and Michael J. Zinaman (CQ Vol 4, No 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):369-374.score: 36.0
    Technical, ethical, and social questions of germ-line gene interventions have been widely discussed in the literature. The majority of these discussions focus on planned interventions executed on the nuclear DNA (nDNA). However, human cells also contain another set of genes that is the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). As the characteristics of the mtDNA grossly differ from those of nDNA, so do the social, ethical, psychological, and safety considerations of possible interventions on this part of the genetic substance.
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  19. Rubenstein, Mary C. MacLeod & M. Eric, Universals.score: 12.0
    Universals are a class of mind independent entities, usually contrasted with individuals, postulated to ground and explain relations of qualitative identity and resemblance among individuals. Individuals are said to be similar in virtue of sharing universals. An apple and a ruby are both red, and their common redness results from sharing a universal. If they are both red at the same time, the universal, red, must be in two places at once. This makes universals quite different from individuals, and controversial. (...)
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