10 found
Sort by:
  1. Jennifer Hawkins (2014). Well-Being, Time, and Dementia. Ethics 124 (3):507-542.
    Philosophers concerned with what would be good for a person sometimes consider a person’s past desires. Indeed, some theorists have argued by appeal to past desires that it is in the best interests of certain dementia patients to die. I reject this conclusion. I consider three different ways one might appeal to a person’s past desires in arguing for conclusions about the good of such patients, finding flaws with each. Of the views I reject, the most interesting one is the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jennifer Hawkins (2011). Daniel M. Haybron, The Pursuit of Unhappiness: The Elusive Psychology of Well-Being (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), Pp. Ix + 357. [REVIEW] Utilitas 23 (2):237-241.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jennifer S. Hawkins (2010). The Subjective Intuition. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):61 - 68.
    Theories of well-being are typically divided into subjective and objective. Subjective theories are those which make facts about a person’s welfare depend on facts about her actual or hypothetical mental states. I am interested in what motivates this approach to the theory of welfare. The contemporary view is that subjectivism is devoted to honoring the evaluative perspective of the individual, but this is both a misleading account of the motivations behind subjectivism, and a vision that dooms subjective theories to failure. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jennifer Hawkins (2008). Desiring the Bad Under the Guise of the Good. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):244–264.
    Desire is commonly spoken of as a state in which the desired object seems good, which apparently ascribes an evaluative element to desire. I offer a new defence of this old idea. As traditionally conceived, this view faces serious objections related to its way of characterizing desire's evaluative content. I develop an alternative conception of evaluative mental content which is plausible in its own right, allows the evaluative desire theorist to avoid the standard objections, and sheds interesting new light on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jennifer S. Hawkins (2008). Well-Being, Autonomy, and the Horizon Problem. Utilitas 20 (2):143-168.
    Desire satisfaction theorists and attitudinal-happiness theorists of well-being are committed to correcting the psychological attitudes upon which their theories are built. However, it is not often recognized that some of the attitudes in need of correction are evaluative attitudes. Moreover, it is hard to know how to correct for poor evaluative attitudes in ways that respect the traditional commitment to the authority of the individual subject's evaluative perspective. L. W. Sumner has proposed an autonomy-as-authenticity requirement to perform this task, but (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jennifer S. Hawkins & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2008). Exploitation and Developing Countries: The Ethics of Clinical Research. Princeton Univ Pr.
    "--Daniel Wikler, Harvard School of Public Health "This book contributes significantly to the literature on exploitation in clinical research conducted in the developing world."--Patricia Marshall, Case Western Reserve University.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jennifer Hawkins (2006). Review of David DeGrazia, Human Identity and Bioethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jennifer S. Hawkins (2006). Justice and Placebo Controls. Social Theory and Practice 32 (3):467-496.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jennifer Susan Hawkins & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2005). Clarifying Confusions About Coercion. Hastings Center Report 35 (5):16-19.
    Commentators often claim that medical research subjects are coerced into participating in clinical studies. In recent years, such claims have appeared especially frequently in ethical discussions of research in developing countries. Medical research ethics is more important than ever as we move into the 21st century because worldwide the pharmaceutical industry has grown so much and shows no sign of slowing its growth. This means that more people are involved in medical research today than ever before, and in the future (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mark Parascandola, Jennifer Hawkins & Marion Danis (2002). Patient Autonomy and the Challenge of Clinical Uncertainty. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (3):245-264.
    : Bioethicists have articulated an ideal of shared decision making between physician and patient, but in doing so the role of clinical uncertainty has not been adequately confronted. In the face of uncertainty about the patient's prognosis and the best course of treatment, many physicians revert to a model of nondisclosure and nondiscussion, thus closing off opportunities for shared decision making. Empirical studies suggest that physicians find it more difficult to adhere to norms of disclosure in situations where there is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation