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  1. Sasha Johnson-Freyd & Jennifer J. Freyd (2013). Revenge and Forgiveness or Betrayal Blindness? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):23 - 24.
    McCullough et al. hypothesize that evolution has selected mechanisms for revenge to deter harms and for forgiveness to preserve valuable relationships. However, in highly dependent relationships, the more adaptive course of action may be to remain unaware of the initial harm rather than risk alienating a needed other. We present a testable model of possible victim responses to interrelational harm.
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  2. Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease (2006). What's the Risk in Asking? Participant Reaction to Trauma History Questions Compared with Reaction to Other Personal Questions. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings compared to other kinds (...)
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  3. Jennifer J. Freyd (2006). The Social Psychology of Cognitive Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):518-519.
    Erdelyi identifies cognitive and emotional motives for repression, but largely neglects social motivations. Yet social pressure to not know, and implicit needs to isolate awareness in order to protect relationships, are common motives. Social motives may even trump emotional motives; the most painful events are sometimes the most difficult to repress. Cognitive repression may be impacted by social information sharing.
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  4. Anne P. DePrince, Carolyn B. Allard, Hannah Oh & Jennifer J. Freyd (2004). What's in a Name for Memory Errors? Implications and Ethical Issues Arising From the Use of the Term "False Memory" for Errors in Memory for Details. Ethics and Behavior 14 (3):201 – 233.
    The term "false memories" has been used to refer to suggestibility experiments in which whole events are apparently confabulated and in media accounts of contested memories of childhood abuse. Since 1992 psychologists have increasingly used the term "false memory" when discussing memory errors for details, such as specific words within word lists. Use of the term to refer to errors in details is a shift in language away from other terms used historically (e.g., "memory intrusions"). We empirically examine this shift (...)
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  5. Jennifer J. Freyd (1998). Science in the Memory Debate. Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):101 – 113.
    Experimental psychology has much to offer the current debate about memories of childhood abuse. However, laboratory scientists, with their enormous cognitive authority to define reality for the rest of the population, must be especially conservative when arguing that laboratory results on memory generalize to contested memories of abuse. Researchers must make an effort to untangle the appropriate from inappropriate application of research results to this debate. A crucial untangling strategy for future research on general phenomena involves taking care to pose (...)
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  6. Jennifer J. Freyd (1994). Betrayal Trauma: Traumatic Amnesia as an Adaptive Response to Childhood Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to which the (...)
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  7. Jennifer J. Freyd (1993). Five Hunches About Perceptual Processes and Dynamic Representations. In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The Mit Press. 99--119.
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  8. Jennifer J. Freyd & J. Q. Johnson (1992). The Evolutionary Psychology of Priesthood Celibacy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):385.
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  9. Jennifer J. Freyd (1990). Natural Selection or Shareability? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):732-734.
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  10. Jennifer J. Freyd & Ronald A. Finke (1985). A Velocity Effect for Representational Momentum. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (6):443-446.
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  11. Jennifer J. Freyd (1983). Shareability: The Social Psychology of Epistemology. Cognitive Science 7 (3):191-210.
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  12. Jennifer J. Freyd (1983). The Mental Representation of Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):145.
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