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Profile: Jennifer K. Uleman (Purchase College, State University of New York)
  1. Jennifer K. Uleman (2010). An Introduction to Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's central tenets, key arguments, and core values are presented in an accessible and engaging way, making this book ideal for anyone eager to explore the fundamentals of Kant's moral philosophy.
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  2. Jennifer K. Uleman (2004). External Freedom in Kant's Rechtslehre: Political, Metaphysical. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):578–601.
    External freedom is the central good protected in Kant's legal and political philosophy. But external freedom is perplexing, being at once freedom of spatio-temporal movement and a form of noumenal or 'intelligible' freedom. Moreover, it turns out that identifying impairments to external freedom nearly always involves recourse to an elaborated system of positive law, which seems to compromise external freedom's status as a prior, organizing good. Drawing heavily on Kant's understanding of the role of empirical 'anthropological' information in constructing a (...)
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  3. Jennifer K. Uleman (2004). Review: Categorical Principles of Law: A Counterpoint to Modernity. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):357-360.
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  4. Jennifer K. Uleman (2000). On Kant, Infanticide, and Finding Oneself in a State of Nature. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 54 (2):173 - 195.
    This paper takes up Kant's argument that infanticides - specifically unwed women who kill their illegitimate children at birth - should not be tried for murder or receive the death penalty. Kant suggests that their actions are committed in a 'state of nature' outside the law's jurisdiction. I aim here both to defend Kant's reasoning against charges that it is cruel , as well as to understand what Kant was thinking in introducing such a 'temporary' state of nature. I claim (...)
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  5. James S. Uleman & Jennifer K. Uleman (1990). Unintended Thought and Nonconscious Inferences Exist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):627-628.
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