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Profile: Jennifer K. Uleman (Purchase College, State University of New York)
  1.  63
    Jennifer K. Uleman (2016). No King and No Torture: Kant on Suicide and Law. Kantian Review 21 (1):77-100.
    Kant’s most canonical argument against suicide, the universal law argument, is widely dismissed. This paper attempts to save it, showing that a suicide maxim, universalized, undermines all bases for practical law, resisting both the non-negotiable value of free rational willing and the ordinary array of sensuous commitments that inform prudential incentives. Suicide therefore undermines moral law governed community as a whole, threatening ‘savage disorder’. In pursuing this argument, I propose a non-teleological and non-theoretical nature – a ‘practical nature’ or moral (...)
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  2.  10
    Jennifer K. Uleman (2010). An Introduction to Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's central tenets, key arguments, and core values are presented in an accessible and engaging way, making this book ideal for anyone eager to explore the fundamentals of Kant's moral philosophy.
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  3.  23
    Jennifer K. Uleman (2004). External Freedom in Kant's Rechtslehre: Political, Metaphysical. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):578–601.
    External freedom is the central good protected in Kant's legal and political philosophy. But external freedom is perplexing, being at once freedom of spatio-temporal movement and a form of noumenal or 'intelligible' freedom. Moreover, it turns out that identifying impairments to external freedom nearly always involves recourse to an elaborated system of positive law, which seems to compromise external freedom's status as a prior, organizing good. Drawing heavily on Kant's understanding of the role of empirical 'anthropological' information in constructing a (...)
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  4.  57
    Jennifer K. Uleman (2004). Review: Categorical Principles of Law: A Counterpoint to Modernity. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):357-360.
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  5.  36
    Jennifer K. Uleman (2000). On Kant, Infanticide, and Finding Oneself in a State of Nature. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 54 (2):173 - 195.
    This paper takes up Kant's argument that infanticides - specifically unwed women who kill their illegitimate children at birth - should not be tried for murder or receive the death penalty. Kant suggests that their actions are committed in a 'state of nature' outside the law's jurisdiction. I aim here both to defend Kant's reasoning against charges that it is cruel , as well as to understand what Kant was thinking in introducing such a 'temporary' state of nature. I claim (...)
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  6.  2
    James S. Uleman & Jennifer K. Uleman (1990). Unintended Thought and Nonconscious Inferences Exist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):627-628.
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  7. Jennifer K. Uleman (2012). An Introduction to Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Immanuel Kant's moral philosophy is one of the most distinctive achievements of the European Enlightenment. At its heart lies what Kant called the 'strange thing': the free, rational, human will. This introduction explores the basis of Kant's anti-naturalist, secular, humanist vision of the human good. Moving from a sketch of the Kantian will, with all its component parts and attributes, to Kant's canonical arguments for his categorical imperative, this introduction shows why Kant thought his moral law the best summary expression (...)
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  8. Jennifer K. Uleman (1995). Kant and the Value of Free Rational Activity. Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    I argue against a reading of Kant's moral theory according to which Kant proposes no substantial conception of the good. Against those who place Kant in the liberal tradition on the basis of his formal, 'neutral framework,' principles, I suggest that Kant's practical and political theory rests on a valuation of the practical and cognitive virtues of self-mastery , self-sufficiency, and regularity. The appeal of Kant's principles, and hence their chances of ever being put into action, accordingly lies not in (...)
     
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  9. Jennifer K. Uleman (2002). The Precritical Kant And So Much More. Florida Philosophical Review 2 (1):41-45.
     
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