Search results for 'Jennifer Love' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Whiting Jennifer (2013). Love: Self-Propagation, Self-Preservation, or Ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):403-429.
    (2013). Love: self-propagation, self-preservation, or ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, No. 4, pp. 403-429.
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  2. Kim A. Bard, Brenda K. Todd, Chris Bernier, Jennifer Love & David A. Leavens (2006). Self-Awareness in Human and Chimpanzee Infants: What is Measured and What is Meant by the Mark and Mirror Test? Infancy 9 (2):191-219.
  3.  1
    Jennifer Esposito, Corrie L. Davis & Bettina L. Love (2007). Brokeback Mountain. Directed by Ang Lee. Los Angeles: Focus Films, 2005. Educational Studies 41 (1):93-99.
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  4. Perfect Love (2007). Chapter Five Process, Parturition, and Perfect Love: Diotima's Rather Non-Platonic Metaphysic of Eros Donald Wayne Viney. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 41.
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  5. Championing Divine Love (2007). Chapter Seven Championing Divine Love and Solving the Problem of Evil200 Thomas Jay Oord. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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  6.  5
    Kurt Love (2012). Love and Rage” in the Classroom: Planting the Seeds of Community Empowerment. Educational Studies 48 (1):52-75.
    Although no one unified anarchist theory exists, educational approaches can be taken to support the full liberation of the self and the construction of an interconnected community that strives to rid itself of eco-sociocultural oppressions. An anarchist pedagogical approach could be one that is rooted in a love/rage unit of analysis occurring along a spectrum of various types of actions and contributions within a community. Anarchism as a violent destruction of the state is a stereotypical view that has perhaps (...)
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  7.  9
    Alan C. Love, Ingo Brigandt, Karola Stotz, Daniel Schweitzer & Alexander Rosenberg (2008). More Worry and Less Love? Metascience 17 (1):1-26.
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  8.  1
    William Jankowiak (2011). The Secret: Love, Marriage and HIV. Jennifer S. Hirsch, Holly Wardlow, Daniel Jordon Smith, Harriet M. Phinney, Shanti Parikh, and Constance A. Nathanson. Vanderbilt University Press, 2009, Xiv+301pp. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (2):1-3.
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  9. William Jankowiak (2011). The Secret: Love, Marriage and HIV. Jennifer S. Hirsch, Holly Wardlow, Daniel Jordon Smith, Harriet M. Phinney, Shanti Parikh, and Constance A. Nathanson. Vanderbilt University Press, 2009, Xiv+301pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 39 (2):1-3.
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  10.  4
    Jennifer L. Syvertsen & Angela Robertson Bazzi (2015). Sex Work, Heroin Injection, and HIV Risk in Tijuana: A Love Story. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):182-194.
    The relationships between female sex workers and their noncommercial male partners are typically viewed as sites of HIV risk rather than meaningful unions. This ethnographic case study presents a nuanced portrayal of the relationship between Cindy and Beto, a female sex worker who injects drugs and her intimate, noncommercial partner who live in Tijuana, Mexico. On the basis of ethnographic research in Tijuana and our long-term involvement in a public health study, we suggest that emotions play a central role in (...)
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  11.  2
    Jennifer A. Herdt (2009). Rain on the Just and the Unjust: The Challenge of Indiscriminate Divine Love. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (1):34-47.
    Hearers of the Sermon on the Mount are called to become children of their heavenly father by loving as God loves. Surprisingly, though, God's love is depicted here as impersonal and indiscriminate, as similar to or even simply as a force of nature, even if a life-giving force: God `makes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the just and the unjust' . Anders Nygren used this verse as core support for his (...)
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  12.  2
    Jennifer Spencer Goodyer (2009). The Blank Face of Love: The Possibility of Goodness in the Literary and Philosophical Work of Iris Murdoch1. Modern Theology 25 (2):217-237.
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  13.  68
    Jennifer Uleman (2006). Guilt, Love, and What We Want: Commentary on Anita Superson's "Privilege, Immorality, and Responsibility for Attending to the 'Facts About Humanity'". Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy 2 (1).
  14.  6
    Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor (2011). "A Particular Piece of Work": Love's Labors in Murdoch's The Bell. Utopian Studies 22 (1):2-18.
  15.  8
    Jennifer Ingleheart (2008). Gibson (R.K.), Green (S.), Sharrock (A.) (Edd.) The Art of Love. Bimillennial Essays on Ovid's Ars Amatoria and Remedia Amoris. Pp. Xii + 375. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-19-927777-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):129-131.
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  16. Jennifer Radden (2000). Love and Loss in Freud's Mourning and Melancholia: A Rereading. In M. Levine (ed.), The Analytic Freud. Routledge 211--30.
     
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  17. Hichem Naar (2015). Subject‐Relative Reasons for Love. Ratio 29 (1).
    Can love be an appropriate response to a person? In this paper, I argue that it can. First, I discuss the reasons why we might think this question should be answered in the negative. This will help us clarify the question itself. Then I argue that, even though extant accounts of reasons for love are inadequate, there remains the suspicion that there must be something about people which make our love for them appropriate. Being lovable, I contend, (...)
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  18. Sara Protasi (2014). Loving People for Who They Are (Even When They Don't Love You Back). European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):214-234.
    The debate on love's reasons ignores unrequited love, which—I argue—can be as genuine and as valuable as reciprocated love. I start by showing that the relationship view of love cannot account for either the reasons or the value of unrequited love. I then present the simple property view, an alternative to the relationship view that is beset with its own problems. In order to solve these problems, I present a more sophisticated version of the property (...)
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  19. Christopher Grau (2014). Love, Loss, and Identity in Solaris. In Susan Wolf & Christopher Grau (eds.), Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction. Oxford University Press
    The sci-fi premise of the 2002 film Solaris allows director Steven Soderbergh to tell a compelling and distinctly philosophical love story. The “visitors” that appear to the characters in the film present us with a vivid thought experiment, and the film naturally prods us to dwell on the following possibility: If confronted with a duplicate (or near duplicate) of someone you love, what would your response be? What should your response be? The tension raised by such a far-fetched (...)
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  20.  30
    Aaron Smuts (2015). Is It Better to Love Better Things? In Tony Milligan, Christian Maurer & Kamila Pacovská (eds.), Love and Its Objects.
    It seems better to love virtue than vice, pleasure than pain, good than evil. Perhaps it's also better to love virtuous people than vicious people. But at the same time, it's repugnant to suggest that a mother should love her smarter, more athletic, better looking son than his dim, clumsy, ordinary brother. My task is to help sort out the conflicting intuitions about what we should love. In particular, I want to address a problem for the (...)
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  21. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists (...)
     
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  22. Christian Maurer (2014). On 'Love at First Sight'. In Christian Maurer, Tony Milligan & Kamila Pacovská (eds.), Love and Its Objects: What Can We Care For? Palgrave Macmillan 160-174.
    This essay focuses on the early phases of romantic love and investigates the phenomenon that is often referred to as ‘Love at First Sight’, where typically very little information about the other is available, yet intensely felt causal processes are at work. It argues that the phenomenon called ‘Love at First Sight’ is not love in a proper sense, even if it may resemble love in certain aspects, and even if, under certain conditions, it may (...)
     
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  23. Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu (2015). The Medicalization of Love. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):323-336.
    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. While such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to “medicalization” of human love and heartache—for some, a source of serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the “medicalization of love” need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have (...)
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  24.  42
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Hsi Liu (2012). Love of Money and Unethical Behavior Intention: Does an Authentic Supervisor's Personal Integrity and Character (ASPIRE) Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):295-312.
    We investigate the extent to which perceptions of the authenticity of supervisor’s personal integrity and character (ASPIRE) moderate the relationship between people’s love of money (LOM) and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB) among 266 part-time employees who were also business students in a five-wave panel study. We found that a high level of ASPIRE perceptions was related to high love-of-money orientation, high self-esteem, but low unethical behavior intention (PUB). Unethical behavior intention (PUB) was significantly correlated with (...)
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  25.  70
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Randy K. Chiu (2003). Income, Money Ethic, Pay Satisfaction, Commitment, and Unethical Behavior: Is the Love of Money the Root of Evil for Hong Kong Employees? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):13 - 30.
    This study examines a model involving income, the love of money, pay satisfaction, organizational commitment, job changes, and unethical behavior among 211 full-time employees in Hong Kong, China. Direct paths suggested that the love of money was related to unethical behavior, but income (money) was not. Indirect paths showed that income was negatively related to the love of money that, in turn, was negatively related to pay satisfaction that, in turn, was negatively associated with unethical behavior. Pay (...)
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  26.  9
    Soňa Lemrová, Eva Reiterová, Renáta Fatěnová, Karel Lemr & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2013). Money is Power: Monetary Intelligence—Love of Money and Temptation of Materialism Among Czech University Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-20.
    In this study, we develop a theoretical model of monetary intelligence (MI), explore the extent to which individuals’ meaning of money is related to the pursuit of materialistic purposes, and test our model using the whole sample and across college major and gender. We select the 15-item love of money (LOM) construct—Factors Good, Evil (Affective), Budget (Behavioral), Achievement, and Power (Cognitive)—from the Money Ethic Scale and Factors Success and Centrality and two indicators—from the Materialism Scale. Based on our data (...)
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  27.  13
    Jingqiu Chen, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Ningyu Tang (2013). Temptation, Monetary Intelligence (Love of Money), and Environmental Context on Unethical Intentions and Cheating. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-23.
    In Study 1, we test a theoretical model involving temptation, monetary intelligence (MI), a mediator, and unethical intentions and investigate the direct and indirect paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected in open classrooms from 492 American and 256 Chinese students. For the whole sample, temptation is related to low unethical intentions indirectly. Multi-group analyses reveal that temptation predicts unethical intentions both indirectly and directly for male American students only; but not for female American students. For Chinese students, both (...)
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  28.  51
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Yuh-Jia Chen (2008). Intelligence Vs. Wisdom: The Love of Money, Machiavellianism, and Unethical Behavior Across College Major and Gender. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):1 - 26.
    This research investigates the efficacy of business ethics intervention, tests a theoretical model that the love of money is directly or indirectly related to propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB), and treats college major (business vs. psychology) and gender (male vs. female) as moderators in multi-group analyses. Results suggested that business students who received business ethics intervention significantly changed their conceptions of unethical behavior and reduced their propensity to engage in theft; while psychology students without intervention had no (...)
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  29. Bennett W. Helm (2010). Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons. Oxford University Press.
    Bennett Helm re-examines our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship.
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  30.  81
    Erich Hatala Matthes (forthcoming). Love in Spite Of. Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 6.
    Consider two commonly cited requirements of love. The first is that we should love people for who they are. The second is that loving people should involve concern for their well-being. But what happens when an aspect of someone’s identity conflicts with her well-being? In examining this question, I develop an account of loving someone in spite of something. Although there are cases where loving in spite of is merited, I argue that we generally do wrong to (...) people in spite of who they are, even where it appears that some aspect of their identity is in tension with their well-being. (shrink)
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  31. C. Stephen Evans (2004). Kierkegaard's Ethic of Love: Divine Commands and Moral Obligations. Oxford University Press.
    C. Stephen Evans explains and defends Kierkegaard's account of moral obligations as rooted in God's commands, the fundamental command being `You shall love your neighbour as yourself'. The work will be of interest not only to those interested in Kierkegaard, but also to those interested in the relation between ethics and religion, especially questions about whether morality can or must have a religious foundation. As well as providing a comprehensive reading of Kierkegaard as an ethical thinker, Evans puts him (...)
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  32.  66
    Troy A. Jollimore (2011). Love's Vision. Princeton University Press.
    "Something in between : on the nature of love" -- Love's blindness (1) : love's closed heart -- Love's blindness (2) : love's friendly eye -- Beyond comparison -- Commitments, values, and frameworks -- Valuing persons -- Love and morality -- Afterword. Between the universal and the particular.
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  33.  19
    Hong Meng Wong (2008). Religiousness, Love of Money, and Ethical Attitudes of Malaysian Evangelical Christians in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):169 - 191.
    Recent research suggests there may be a link between religiousness and business ethics. This study seeks to add to the understanding of the relationship through a questionnaire survey on Malaysian Christians in business. The questionnaire taps into three different constructs. The religiousness construct is reflected in the level of participation in various common religious activities. The love of money construct is captured through the Love of Money Scale as used in Luna-Arocas and Tang [Journal of Business Ethics 50 (...)
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  34.  61
    T. L. P. Tang (2007). Income and Quality of Life: Does the Love of Money Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):375 - 393.
    This paper examines a model of income and quality of life that controls the love of money, job satisfaction, gender, and marital status and treats employment status (full-time versus part-time), income level, and gender as moderators. For the whole sample, income was not significantly related to quality of life when this path was examined alone. When all variables were controlled, income was negatively related to quality of life. When (1) the love of money was negatively correlated to job (...)
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  35.  4
    Anusorn Singhapakdi, Scott J. Vitell, Dong-Jin Lee, Amiee Mellon Nisius & Grace B. Yu (2013). The Influence of Love of Money and Religiosity on Ethical Decision-Making in Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):183-191.
    The impact of “love of money” on different aspects of consumers’ ethical beliefs has been investigated by previous research. In this study we investigate the potential impact of “love of money” on a manager’s ethical decision-making in marketing. Another objective of the current study is to investigate the potential impacts of extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity on ethical marketing decision-making. We also include ethical judgments as an element of ethical decision-making. We found “love of money”, both dimensions of (...)
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  36.  2
    Antonio Argandoña (2011). Beyond Contracts: Love in Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):77 - 85.
    The traditional theories of the firm leave no room for love in business organizations, perhaps because it is thought that love is only an emotion or feeling, not a virtue, or because economic efficiency and profit making are considered to be incompatible with the practice of charity or love. In this article, we show based on an approach to the human action within the organization, that love can and must be lived in firms for firms to (...)
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  37. Aaron Smuts, In Defense of the No-Reasons View of Love.
    Although we can try to explain why we love, we can never justify our love. Love is neither based on reasons, nor responsive to reasons, nor can it be assessed for normative reasons. Love can be odd, unfortunate, fortuitous, or even sadly lacking, but it can never be appropriate or inappropriate. We may have reasons to act on our love, but we cannot justify our loving feelings. Shakespeare's Bottom is right: "Reason and love keep (...)
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  38.  73
    Julian Savulescu & Anders Sandberg (2008). Neuroenhancement of Love and Marriage: The Chemicals Between Us. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):31-44.
    This paper reviews the evolutionary history and biology of love and marriage. It examines the current and imminent possibilities of biological manipulation of lust, attraction and attachment, so called neuroenhancement of love. We examine the arguments for and against these biological interventions to influence love. We argue that biological interventions offer an important adjunct to psychosocial interventions, especially given the biological limitations inherent in human love.
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  39.  35
    Roberto Luna-Arocas & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2004). The Love of Money, Satisfaction, and the Protestant Work Ethic: Money Profiles Among Univesity Professors in the U.S.A. And Spain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):329-354.
    This study tests the hypothesis that university professors (lecturers) (in the U.S. and Spain) with different money profiles (based on Factors Success, Budget, Motivator, Equity, and Evil of the Love of Money Scale) will differ in work-related attitudes and satisfaction. Results suggested that Achieving Money Worshipers (with high scores on Factors Success, Motivator, Equity, and Budget) had high income, Work Ethic, and high satisfaction with pay level, pay administration, and internal equity comparison but low satisfaction with external equity comparison. (...)
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  40.  64
    Cam Caldwell & Rolf D. Dixon (2010). Love, Forgiveness, and Trust: Critical Values of the Modern Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):91 - 101.
    In a world that has become increasingly dependent upon employee ownership, commitment, and initiative, organizations need leaders who can inspire their␣employees and motivate them individually. Love, forgiveness, and trust are critical values of today’s organization leaders who are committed to maximizing value for organizations while helping organization members to become their best. We explain the importance of love, forgiveness, and trust in the modern organization and identify 10 commonalities of these virtues.
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  41.  70
    Lauren Ware (2014). What Good is Love? Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 34 (2).
    The role of emotions in mental life is the subject of longstanding controversy, spanning the history of ethics, moral psychology, and educational theory. This paper defends an account of love’s cognitive power. My starting point is Plato’s dialogue, the Symposium, in which we find the surprising claim that love aims at engendering moral virtue. I argue that this understanding affords love a crucial place in educational curricula, as engaging the emotions can motivate both cognitive achievement and moral (...)
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  42. Neil Delaney (1996). Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339 - 356.
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
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  43.  9
    Sharon Krishek (2009). Kierkegaard on Faith and Love. Cambridge University Press.
    Krishek's original and compelling interpretation of the Works of Love in the light of Kierkegaard's famous analysis of the paradoxicality of faith in Fear and Trembling shows that preferential love, and in particular romantic love, plays a ...
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  44. Christopher Grau (2010). Love and History. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):246-271.
    In this essay, I argue that a proper understanding of the historicity of love requires an appreciation of the irreplaceability of the beloved. I do this through a consideration of ideas that were first put forward by Robert Kraut in “Love De Re” (1986). I also evaluate Amelie Rorty's criticisms of Kraut's thesis in “The Historicity of Psychological Attitudes: Love is Not Love Which Alters Not When It Alteration Finds” (1986). I argue that Rorty fundamentally misunderstands (...)
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  45. John Danaher (2013). The Vice of In-Principlism and the Harmfulness of Love. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):19-21.
    This is a response to Earp and colleagues' target article "If I could just stop loving you: Anti-love biotechnology and the ethics of a chemical break-up". I argue that the authors may indulge in the vice of in-principlism when presenting their ethical framework for dealing with anti-love biotechnology, and that they mis-apply the concept of harm.
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  46. A. W. Price (1989). Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores for the first time an idea common to both Plato and Aristotle: although people are separate, their lives need not be; one person's life may overflow into another's, so that helping someone else is a way of serving oneself. Price considers how this idea unites the philosophers' treatments of love and friendship (which are otherwise very different), and demonstrates that this view of love and friendship, applied not only to personal relationships, but also to the (...)
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  47.  61
    Eva Feder Kittay (1999). Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality and Dependence. Routledge.
  48.  69
    Ishtiyaque Haji & Stefaan E. Cuypers (2007). Love Imperiled. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 3 (1):0-0.
    In this paper, we argue that hard incompatibilism imperils a typical component of loving relations —lovable behavior—if it imperils moral praiseworthiness. We propose that to be lovable behavior, the behavior must exemplify the property of being commendable (the property of being praiseworthy from the standpoint of love), in contrast to being morally praiseworthy (praiseworthy from the point of view of moral duty). But if hard incompatibilism undermines moral praiseworthiness, then it just as surely undermines commendability. Thus, hard incompatibilism imperils (...)
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  49.  31
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Grace Mei-Tzu Wu Davis, Dariusz Dolinski, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim & Sharon Lynn Wagner (2008). To Help or Not to Help? The Good Samaritan Effect and the Love of Money on Helping Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):865 - 887.
    This research tests a model of employee helping behavior (a component of Organizational Citizenship Behavior, OCB) that involves a direct path (Intrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior, the Good Samaritan Effect) and an indirect path (the Love of Money → Extrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior). Results for the full sample supported the Good Samaritan Effect. Further, the love of money was positively related to extrinsic motives that were negatively related with helping behavior. We tested the model across four cultures (...)
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  50. Alan Soble (2000). The Coherence of Love. Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):293-315.
    I examine three common beliefs about love: constancy, exclusivity, and the claim that love is a response to the properties of the beloved. Following a discussion of their relative consistency, I argue that neither the constancy nor the exclusivity of love are saved by the contrary belief, that love is not (entirely) a response to the properties of the beloved.
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