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  1.  42
    Jennifer M. Welsh (2010). Implementing the “Responsibility to Protect”: Where Expectations Meet Reality. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (4):415-430.
    Scholars of RtoP need a much deeper understanding of both how norms evolve and the competing normative commitments that drive those who remain skeptical of endowing the international community with a responsibility to protect.
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  2.  28
    Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.) (2003). Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford.
    Should states use military force for humanitarian purposes? Leading scholars and practitioners provide practical and theoretical answers to this burning question, demonstrating why humanitarian intervention continues to be a controversial issue, not only for the UN, but also for Western states and humanitarian organizations.
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  3. Jennifer M. Welsh (2003). Taking Consequences Seriously: Objections to Humanitarian Intervention. In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford
  4.  3
    Jennifer M. Welsh (1994). The Role of the Inner Enemy in European Self-Definition: Identity, Culture and International Relations Theory. History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):53-61.
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  5. Stefano Recchia & Jennifer M. Welsh (eds.) (2016). Just and Unjust Military Intervention: European Thinkers From Vitoria to Mill. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical arguments about the legitimate use of force have profoundly shaped the norms and institutions of contemporary international society. But what specific lessons can we learn from the classical European philosophers and jurists when thinking about humanitarian intervention, preventive self-defense or international trusteeship today? The contributors to this volume take seriously the admonition of contextualist scholars not to uproot classical thinkers' arguments from their social, political and intellectual environment. Nevertheless, this collection demonstrates that contemporary students, scholars and policymakers can still (...)
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  6. Jennifer M. Welsh (2006). Conclusion: Humanitarian Intervention After 11 September. In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford
  7. Jennifer M. Welsh (2006). Conclusion: The Evolution of Humanitarian Intervention in International Society. In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford 176--188.
     
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  8. Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.) (2003). Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford.
    Should states use military force for humanitarian purposes? Well known scholars and practitioners come together in this book to provide practical and theoretical answers to this burning question. Case studies include Somalia, Rwanda, the Balkans, and East Timor, as well as the recent US intervention in Afghanistan. The book demonstrates why humanitarian intervention continues to be a controversial issue not only for the United Nations, but also for Western states and humanitarian organisations.
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  9. Jennifer M. Welsh (2006). Introduction. In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. OUP Oxford
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