Search results for 'Jennifer Washburn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Patricia Keith-Spiegel, Barbara G. Tabachnick, Bernard E. Whitley Jr & Jennifer Washburn (1998). Why Professors Ignore Cheating: Opinions of a National Sample of Psychology Instructors. Ethics and Behavior 8 (3):215 – 227.score: 240.0
    To understand better why evidence of student cheating is often ignored, a national sample of psychology instructors was sampled for their opinions. The 127 respondents overwhelmingly agreed that dealing with instances of academic dishonesty was among the most onerous aspects of their profession. Respondents cited insufficient evidence that cheating has occurred as the most frequent reason for overlooking student behavior or writing that might be dishonest. A factor analysis revealed 4 other clusters of reasons as to why cheating may be (...)
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  2. Patricia Keith-Spiegel, Barbara G. Tabachnick, Bernard E. Whitley Jr & Jennifer Washburn (1998). Why Professors Ignore Cheating: Opinions of a National Sample of Psychology Instructors. Ethics and Behavior 8 (3):215-227.score: 240.0
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  3. J. Smith, W. Shields & D. Washburn (2003). The Comparative Psychology of Uncertainty Monitoring and Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):317-339.score: 30.0
    Researchers have begun to explore animals' capacities for uncertainty monitoring and metacognition. This exploration could extend the study of animal self-awareness and establish the relationship of self-awareness to other-awareness. It could sharpen descriptions of metacognition in the human literature and suggest the earliest roots of metacognition in human development. We summarize research on uncertainty monitoring by humans, monkeys, and a dolphin within perceptual and metamemory tasks. We extend phylogenetically the search for metacognitive capacities by considering studies that have tested less (...)
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  4. Lewis Carroll & Margaret Washburn (1894). A Logical Paradox. Mind 3 (11):436-440.score: 30.0
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  5. Michael Washburn (1984). Kant's Theory of Mind: An Analysis of the Paralogisms of Pure Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (2):245-247.score: 30.0
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  6. Margaret Washburn (1921). Introspection as an Objective Method. Psychological Review 29:89-112.score: 30.0
  7. Michael J. Stark & Michael C. Washburn (1977). Ego, Egocentricity, and Self-Transcendence: A Western Interpretation of Eastern Teaching. Philosophy East and West 27 (3):265-283.score: 30.0
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  8. J. Kutcher Eugene, D. Bragger Jennifer, Jamie Ofelia Rodriguez-Srednicki & L. Masco (forthcoming). The Role of Religiosity in Stress, Job Attitudes, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 30.0
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  9. Michael Washburn (1975). Dogmatism, Scepticism, Criticism: The Dialectic of Kant's "Silent Decade". Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (2):167-176.score: 30.0
  10. C. Chen Jennifer, M. Patten Dennis & W. Roberts Robin (2008). Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy? Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1).score: 30.0
    This study examines the relation between firms’ corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains – employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate area of social performance, (...)
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  11. Margaret Floy Washburn (1919). Dualism in Animal Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (2):41-44.score: 30.0
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  12. David A. Washburn (1997). The MacKay-Skinner Debate: A Case for “Nothing Buttery”. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):473 – 479.score: 30.0
    Donald M. MacKay believed that freedom of action and human dignity are compatible with a science of behavior. In 1971 he argued this position with B.F. Skinner in a televised debate. After a brief biography of MacKay, several major points from this debate will be reviewed. The discussion serves to emphasize the correspondence rather than competition between levels of analysis, whether the levels are disciplinary (e.g. psychology, neuroscience, physics) or a matter of perspective (inside story, outside story).
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  13. Alexander M. Sidorkin (2012). Mad Hatters, Jackbooted Managers, and the Massification of Higher Education. Educational Theory 62 (4):487-500.score: 30.0
    In this review of three recent books on higher education, Alexander Sidorkin shows how the disinterested discourse that appears to be anticapitalist and anticommercial is actually a way of obtaining income from state subsidies. What links the books under review—Cary Nelson's No University Is an Island: Saving Academic Freedom, Frank Donoghue's The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities, and Jennifer Washburn's University, Inc.: The Corporate Corruption of Higher Education—is their critical evaluation of the (...)
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  14. Margaret Floy Washburn (1904). The Genetic Method in Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (18):491-494.score: 30.0
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  15. Margaret Floy Washburn (1906). The Term `Feeling'. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (3):62-63.score: 30.0
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  16. A. Knight Jennifer, J. Comino Elizabeth & Lisa Jackson-Pulver Elizabeth Harris (2009). Indigenous Research: A Commitment to Walking the Talk. The Gudaga Study—an Australian Case Study. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4).score: 30.0
    Increasingly, the role of health research in improving the discrepancies in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in developed countries is being recognised. Along with this comes the recognition that health research must be conducted in a manner that is culturally appropriate and ethically sound. Two key documents have been produced in Australia, known as The Road Map and The Guidelines, to provide theoretical and philosophical direction to the ethics of Indigenous health research. These documents identify research themes considered (...)
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  17. Margaret Floy Washburn (1904). A Factor in Mental Development. Philosophical Review 13 (6):622-626.score: 30.0
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  18. Michael Washburn (1987). Human Wholeness in Light of Five Types of Psychic Duality. Zygon 22 (1):67-85.score: 30.0
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  19. J. David Smith, Wendy E. Shields & David A. Washburn (2003). Inaugurating a New Area of Comparative Cognition Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):358-369.score: 30.0
    There was a strong consensus in the commentaries that animals' performances in metacognition paradigms indicate high-level decisional processes that cannot be explained associatively. Our response summarizes this consensus and the support for the idea that these performances demonstrate animal metacognition. We amplify the idea that there is an adaptive advantage favoring animals who can – in an immediate moment of difficulty or uncertainty – construct a decisional assemblage that lets them find an appropriate behavioral solution. A working consciousness would serve (...)
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  20. Margaret Floy Washburn, A Mead Project Source Page.score: 30.0
    FROM the point of view of scientific investigation no two subjects could present a stronger contrast than the two named in the title of this book. Movement is the ultimate fact of physical science. The measurement of the direction and velocity of movements is the most satisfactory achievement of science, and the scientist is contented with his explanation of any natural phenomenon when he has reduced it to movements and expressed their relations in a mathematical formula. On the other hand, (...)
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  21. Jason J. Washburn (2008). Encouraging Research Collaboration Through Ethical and Fair Authorship: A Model Policy. Ethics and Behavior 18 (1):44 – 58.score: 30.0
    Realizing a comprehensive approach to evidence-based practice in psychology requires the collaboration of academic researchers and practicing clinicians. Increased collaboration is likely to contribute to the growing trend of multi-investigator projects, multiple-authored publications, and the subsequent conflicts regarding authorship credit and order. Recommendations and guidance on determining authorship credit and order are available in the literature; however, few concrete tools are available to assist in determining authorship credit and order. A model policy on authorship is presented. The model policy was (...)
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  22. Margaret Floy Washburn (1899). Subjective Colours and the After-Image: Their Significance for the Theory of Attention. Mind 8 (29):25-34.score: 30.0
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  23. Margaret Floy Washburn (1917). Some Thoughts on the Last Quarter Century in Psychology. Philosophical Review 26 (1):46-55.score: 30.0
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  24. Margaret Washburn (1896). The Intensive Statement of Particular and Negative Propositions. Philosophical Review 5 (4):403-405.score: 30.0
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  25. Margaret Washburn (1898). The Psychology of Deductive Logic. Mind 7 (28):523-530.score: 30.0
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  26. Margaret Washburn (1895). Notes. Philosophical Review 4 (3):347-352.score: 30.0
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  27. Margaret F. Washburn (1919). The New Rationalism and Objective Idealism: Rejoinder. Philosophical Review 28 (6):605-617.score: 30.0
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  28. Margaret Washburn (1897). The Process of Recognition. Philosophical Review 6 (3):267-274.score: 30.0
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  29. David A. Washburn & Michael J. Rulon (1997). Under His Microscope: Donald M. MacKay. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):471 – 472.score: 30.0
  30. W. R. Sorley, Margaret Washburn, W. B. Pillsbury, Hubert M. Foston, Charles Douglas, Alexander F. Shand, B. A. W. Russell, James Lindsay & W. R. Scott (1896). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 5 (17):119-133.score: 30.0
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  31. M. Washburn, T. B., M. D., J. L. McIntyre, S. F. & M. S. (1895). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 4 (14):257-269.score: 30.0
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  32. Margaret Floy Washburn (1902). Some Examples of the Use of Psychological Analysis in System-Making. Philosophical Review 11 (5):445-462.score: 30.0
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  33. Margaret Floy Washburn (1905). Wundtian Feeling Analysis and the Genetic Significance of Feeling. Philosophical Review 14 (1):21-29.score: 30.0
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  34. Margaret Washburn (1898). Discussions. Mind 7 (28):523-530.score: 30.0
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  35. Margaret Washburn (1896). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 5 (1):121-122.score: 30.0
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  36. Donald E. Washburn & Dennis R. Smith (eds.) (1974). Coping with Increasing Complexity: Implications of General Semantics and General Systems Theory. Gordon and Breach.score: 30.0
     
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  37. Phil Washburn (2008). Philosophical Dilemmas: A Pro and Con Introduction to the Major Questions. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Philosophical Dilemmas: A Pro and Con Introduction to the Major Questions, 2/e, is a lucidly written and comprehensive introduction to philosophy featuring sixty brief essays arranged in pairs. Each pair answers one of the standard philosophical questions, such as "Does God exist?" or "Is morality relative?," with affirmative and negative responses. Each essay takes a definite stand and promotes it vigorously, creating a sharp contrast between the two positions and giving each abstract theory a more personal and believable "voice." While (...)
     
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  38. Phil Washburn (1997). Philosophical Dilemmas: Building a Worldview. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Lucidly written, this extensive and very original introduction to philosophy features over fifty brief, jargon-free essays arranged in pairs. Each pair answers one of the principal philosophical questions, such as "Does God exist?" or "Are we free?", with two opposing points of view. On the topic of relativism, for example, one essay argues that morality is created by society and relative to it, while the other claims that moral standards are absolute and universal. Each essay takes a definite stand and (...)
     
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  39. Phil Washburn (2010). The Vocabulary of Critical Thinking. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The Vocabulary of Critical Thinkingtakes an innovative, practical, and accessible approach to teaching critical thinking and reasoning skills. With the underlying notion that a good way to practice fundamental reasoning skills is to learn to name them, the text explores one hundred and eight words that are important to know and employ within any discipline. These words are about comparing, generalizing, explaining, inferring, judging sources, evaluating, referring, assuming and creating - actions used to assess relationships and arguments - and the (...)
     
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  40. Jennifer Hornsby & Jason Stanley (2005). I-Paper by Jennifer Hornsby. Semantic Knowledge and Practical Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):107–130.score: 21.0
    [Jennifer Hornsby] The central claim is that the semantic knowledge exercised by people when they speak is practical knowledge. The relevant idea of practical knowledge is explicated, applied to the case of speaking, and connected with an idea of agents' knowledge. Some defence of the claim is provided. /// [Jason Stanley] The central claim is that Hornsby's argument that semantic knowledge is practical knowledge is based upon a false premise. I argue, contra Hornsby, that speakers do not voice their (...)
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  41. Stephen Stich (2013). Do Different Groups Have Different Epistemic Intuitions? A Reply to Jennifer Nagel1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (1):151-178.score: 18.0
    Intuitions play an important role in contemporary epistemology. Over the last decade, however, experimental philosophers have published a number of studies suggesting that epistemic intuitions may vary in ways that challenge the widespread reliance on intuitions in epistemology. In a recent paper, Jennifer Nagel offers a pair of arguments aimed at showing that epistemic intuitions do not, in fact, vary in problematic ways. One of these arguments relies on a number of claims defended by appeal to the psychological literature (...)
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  42. Jennifer Saul (2006). Jennifer Saul Gender and Race. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):119–143.score: 18.0
  43. Jennifer Duke-Yonge (2009). Simple Sentences, Substitution, and Intuitions • by Jennifer Saul. Analysis 69 (1):174-176.score: 18.0
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  44. Jennifer M. Saul (2002). Intensionality: What Are Intensional Transitives?: Jennifer Saul. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):101–119.score: 18.0
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  45. Andreas Stokke (forthcoming). Saying Too Little and Saying Too Much. Critical Notice of 'Lying, Misleading and What is Said', by Jennifer Saul. Saying Too Little and Saying Too Much. Critical Notice of 'Lying, Misleading and What is Said', by Jennifer Saul 5 (35):81-91.score: 18.0
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  46. David Macarthur (forthcoming). Possibilities of Perception by Church, Jennifer. :1-4.score: 18.0
    Possibilities of Perception by Church, Jennifer. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.945602.
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  47. Antonietta di Vito (2000). Jennifer COATES, Women Talk. Conversations Between Women Friends, London, Blackwell Publishers, 1996, 324 p. Clio 1:18-18.score: 18.0
    En dépit de sa date de parution un peu ancienne, il semble important de signaler cet ouvrage aux lecteurs de ce numéro de Clio. Les évaluations péjoratives de la conversation féminine sont, comme on sait, un des lieux communs les plus anciens et les plus ancrés ; « bavardage », « caquetage », « ragots »... sont quelques-uns des termes métaphoriques qui stigmatisent une façon d'échanger et un style de contenu situés au plus loin de la parole sûre et pondérée (...)
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  48. Jennifer Pitts (2007). Liberalism, Democracy and Empire: Tocqueville on Algeria Jennifer Pitts. In Raf Geenens & Annelien de Dijn (eds.), Reading Tocqueville: From Oracle to Actor. Palgrave Macmillan. 12.score: 18.0
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  49. Dan Vaillancourt (2010). Aesthetics and Material Beauty: Aesthetics Naturalized by Mcmahon, Jennifer A. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):76-79.score: 15.0
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  50. Neil Levy (2009). What, and Where, Luck Is: A Response to Jennifer Lackey. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):489 – 497.score: 15.0
    In 'What Luck Is Not', Lackey presents counterexamples to the two most prominent accounts of luck: the absence of control account and the modal account. I offer an account of luck that conjoins absence of control to a modal condition. I then show that Lackey's counterexamples mislocate the luck: the agents in her cases are lucky, but the luck precedes the event upon which Lackey focuses, and that event is itself only fortunate, not lucky. Finally I offer an account of (...)
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