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  1. Jennifer Welchman (2013). The Fall and Rise of Aristotelian Ethics in Anglo-American Moral Philosophy: 19th and 20th Century. In Jon Miller (ed.), The Reception of Aristotle's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  2. Jennifer Welchman (2012). A Defence of Environmental Stewardship. Environmental Values 21 (3):297 - 316.
    Public recognition of the fragility of the natural systems on which present and future generations depend has prompted calls for the practice of environmental stewardship—calls widely criticised in the environmental ethics literature. Some argue that stewardship's historical associations entail that it is inherently sexist, speciesist and/or anthropocentric. Others argue that absent belief in a creator to appoint us as stewards and hold us accountable, talk of 'environmental stewardship' is empty. I review the concept's recent evolution and provide a tentative definition. (...)
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  3. Jennifer Welchman (2010). Dewey's Moral Philosophy. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  4. Jennifer Welchman (2009). Hume, Callicott, and the Land Ethic: Prospects and Problems. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (2):201-220.
  5. Jennifer Welchman (2008). Hume and the Prince of Thieves. Hume Studies 34 (1):3-19.
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  6. Jennifer Welchman (2008). Dewey and McDowell on Naturalism, Values, and Second Nature. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (1):pp. 50-58.
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  7. Jennifer Welchman (2008). Environmental Virtue Ethics - Edited by Ronald Sandler & Philip Cafaro. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):77–83.
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  8. Jennifer Welchman (2007). Frankenfood, or, Fear and Loathing at the Grocery Store. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):141-150.
    Genetically modified food crops have been called ‘frankenfoods’ since 1992. Although some might dismiss the phenomena as clever marketing by anti-GM groups, of no philosophic interest, its resonance with the general public suggests otherwise. I argue that examination of the intersection of popular conceptions of monsters, nature, and food at which ‘frankenfood’ stands reveals significant and disturbing trends in our relationship to organic nature of interest to moral and social philosophy and to environmental ethics.
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  9. Jennifer Welchman (2007). Norton and Passmore on Valuing Nature. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (4):353-363.
    Norton argues on pragmatic “Deweyan” grounds that we should cease to ask scientists for value neutral definitions of “sustainability,” developed independently of moral and social values, to guide our environmental policy making debates. “Sustainability,” like human “health,” is a normative concept from the start—one that cannot be meaningfully developed by scientists or economists without input by all the stake holders affected. While I endorse Norton’s approach, I question his apparent presumption that concern for sustainability for the future is at odds (...)
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  10. Jennifer Welchman (2007). Who Rebutted Bernard Mandeville? History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (1):57 - 74.
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  11. Jennifer Welchman (2006). William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of abandoning them. I (...)
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  12. Jennifer Welchman (2005). Virtue Ethics and Human Development: A Pragmatic Approach. In Stephen Mark Gardiner (ed.), Virtue Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press. 142--155.
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  13. Jennifer Welchman & Glenn G. Griener (2005). Patient Advocacy and Professional Associations: Individual and Collective Responsibilities. Nursing Ethics 12 (3):296-304.
    Professions have traditionally treated advocacy as a collective duty, best assigned to professional associations to perform. In North American nursing, advocacy for issues affecting identifiable patients is assigned instead to their nurses. We argue that nursing associations’ withdrawal from advocacy for patient care issues is detrimental to nurses and patients alike. Most nurses work in large institutions whose internal policies they cannot influence. When these create obstacles to good care, the inability of nurses to affect change can result in avoidable (...)
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  14. Susan Tridgell, Reg Naulty, Robert Larmer, Jennifer Welchman, Struan Jacobs, Christopher Lundgren, Adrian Walsh, John Makeham & Muhammad Kamal (2004). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Sophia 43 (2):129-147.
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  15. Jennifer Welchman (2004). Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking, Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (3):217-219.
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  16. Jennifer Welchman (2003). Foot, Phillippa. Natural Goodness. Review of Metaphysics 56 (4):874-876.
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  17. Jennifer Welchman (2003). Xenografting, Species Loyalty, and Human Solidarity. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (2):244–255.
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  18. Jennifer Welchman (2002). Logic and Judgments of Practice. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press. 27.
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  19. Jennifer Welchman (2001). Is Ecosabotage Civil Disobedience? Philosophy and Geography 4 (1):97 – 107.
    According to current definitions of civil disobedience, drawn from the work of John Rawls and Carl Cohen, eco-saboteurs are not civil disobedients because their disobedience is not a form of address and/or does not appeal to the public's sense of justice or human welfare. But this definition also excludes disobedience by a wide range of groups, from labor activists to hunt saboteurs, either because they are obstructionist or because they address moral concerns other than justice or the public weal. However (...)
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  20. Jennifer Welchman (2000). Larry Hickman, Ed., Reading Dewey: Interpretations for a Postmodern Generation Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (1):40-42.
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  21. Jennifer Welchman (1999). The Virtues of Stewardship. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):411-423.
    What virtues do good stewards typically have and can these virtues move people to be good stewards of nature? Why focus on the virtues of stewards rather than on trying to construct and defend morally obligatory rules to govern human behavior? I argue that benevolence and loyalty are crucial for good stewardship and these virtues can and do motivate people to act as good stewards of nature. Moreover,since it is a matter of dispute whether rational considerations can move us to (...)
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  22. Jennifer Welchman (1998). Social Freedom. Dialogue 37 (4):858-859.
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  23. Jennifer Welchman (1998). Social Freedom: The Responsibility View Kristján Kristjánsson New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xi + 221 Pp., $49.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (04):858-.
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  24. Jennifer Welchman (1997). Dewey and Moore on the Science of Ethics. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (2):392 - 409.
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  25. Jennifer Welchman (1995). Dewey's Ethical Thought. Cornell University Press.
    'This book not only revises the interpretation of Dewey's ethics but also has relevance to recent discussions about the possibility of naturalistic, ...
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  26. Jennifer Welchman (1995). Kant and the Land Ethic. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 2 (2):17-22.
    Does Leopold’s land ethic principle represent a break with traditional We stern moral philosophies as some have argued? Or is it instead an extension of traditional Western moral ideas as Leopold believed? I argue that Leopold’s principle is compatible with an ecologically-informed Kantianism.
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  27. Jennifer Welchman (1995). Locke on Slavery and Inalienable Rights. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):67 - 81.
    Some have argued that Locke's failure to condemn contemporary slavery is best viewed as a personal moral lapse which does not reflect on his political theory. I argue to the contrary.
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  28. Jennifer Welchman (1990). Dewey (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):465-466.
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  29. Jennifer Welchman (1989). From Absolute Idealism to Instrumentalism: The Problem of Dewey's Early Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 25 (4):407 - 419.
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  30. Jennifer Welchman (1989). G. E. Moore and the Revolution in Ethics: A Reappraisal. History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (3):317 - 329.
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