Search results for 'Jenny Morris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul Bloom, Timp German, Michelle O'riordan, Albert Postma & Elizabeth Blair Morris (2000). Jenny R. saffran, Michelle M. Loman, Rachel rw Robertson. Cognition 77 (291):291-292.score: 360.0
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  2. Jenny Morris (2001). Impairment and Disability: Constructing an Ethics of Care That Promotes Human Rights. Hypatia 16 (4):1-16.score: 240.0
    : The social model of disability gives us the tools not only to challenge the discrimination and prejudice we face, but also to articulate the personal experience of impairment. Recognition of difference is therefore a key part of the assertion of our common humanity and of an ethics of care that promotes our human rights.
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  3. William Morris (2001). The Earthly Paradise by William Morris. Routledge.score: 210.0
    This annotated critical edition is the first attempt to make Morris's 42,000-word verse sequence accessible to a modern audience.
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  4. Henry Morris (1984). The Henry Morris Collection. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Henry Morris (1889-1961), the great educational philosopher, and initiator of the integrated community educational centre - embodied in the Cambridgeshire village college system - was county education officer and had his first 'memorandum' on the concept of community education printed by the Cambridge University Press. 1984 is both the 60th anniversary of his first memorandum and the 400th anniversary of the Press and this commemorative book will be published to coincide with a number of events to celebrate that. The (...)
     
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  5. Michael Morris (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this textbook, Michael Morris offers a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and is (...)
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  6. Stephen G. Morris (2009). The Evolution of Cooperative Behavior and its Implications for Ethics. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):915-926.score: 60.0
    While many philosophers agree that evolutionary theory has important implications for the study of ethics, there has been no consensus on what these implications are. I argue that we can better understand these implications by examining two related yet distinct issues in evolutionary theory: the evolution of our moral beliefs and the evolution of cooperative behavior. While the prevailing evolutionary account of morality poses a threat to moral realism, a plausible model of how altruism evolved in human beings provides the (...)
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  7. Colin Morris (1972/1987). The Discovery of the Individual, 1050-1200. University of Toronto Press in Association with the Medieval Academy of America.score: 60.0
    Colin Morris traces the origin of the concept of the individual, not to the Renaissance where it is popularly assumed to have been invented, but farther back, ...
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  8. Norval Morris (1992). The Brothel Boy, and Other Parables of the Law. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The mystery does not always end when the crime has been solved. Indeed, the most insolvable problems of crime and punishment are not so much who committed the crime, but how to see that justice is done. Now, in this illuminating volume, one of America's great legal thinkers, Norval Morris, addresses some of the most perplexing and controversial questions of justice in a highly singular fashion--by examining them in fictional form, in what he calls "parables of the law." The (...)
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  9. Michael Morris (1992). The Good and the True. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book provides a radical alternative to naturalistic theories of content, and offers a new conception of the place of mind in the world. Confronting the scientific conception of the nature of reality that has dominated the Anglo-American philosophical tradition, Morris presents a detailed analysis of content and propositional attitudes based on the idea that truth is a value. He rejects the causal theory of the explanation of behavior and replaces it with an alternative that depends upon a rich (...)
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  10. Gordon Baker & Katherine Morris (1995). Descartes' Dualism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Was Descartes a Cartesian Dualist? In this controversial study, Gordon Baker and Katherine J. Morris argue that, despite the general consensus within philosophy, Descartes was neither a proponent of dualism nor guilty of the many crimes of which he has been accused by twentieth century philosophers. In lively and engaging prose, Baker and Morris present a radical revision of the ways in which Descartes' work has been interpreted. Descartes emerges with both his historical importance assured and his philosophical (...)
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  11. Christopher W. Morris (2011). Questions of Life and Death: Readings in Practical Ethics. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Featuring sixty-seven classic and contemporary selections, Questions of Life and Death: Readings in Practical Ethics is ideal for courses in contemporary moral problems, applied ethics, and introduction to ethics. In contrast with other moral problems anthologies, it deals exclusively with current moral issues concerning life and death, the ethics of killing, and the ethics of saving lives. By focusing on these specific questions--rather than on an unrelated profusion of moral problems--this volume offers a theoretically unified presentation that enables students to (...)
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  12. Christopher Morris (2002). Reading Opera Between the Lines: Orchestral Interludes and Cultural Meaning From Wagner to Berg. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    A characteristic feature of Wagnerian and post-Wagnerian opera is the tendency to link scenes with numerous and often surprisingly lengthy orchestral interludes, frequently performed with the curtain closed. Often taken for granted or treated as a filler by audiences and critics, these interludes can take on very prominent roles, representing dream sequences, journeys and sexual encounters, and in some cases becoming a highlight of the opera. Christopher Morris investigates the implications of these important but strangely overlooked passages. Combining close (...)
     
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  13. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2006). Is Incompatibilism Intuitive? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):28 - 53.score: 30.0
    Incompatibilists believe free will is impossible if determinism is true, and they often claim that this view is supported by ordinary intuitions. We challenge the claim that incompatibilism is intuitive to most laypersons and discuss the significance of this challenge to the free will debate. After explaining why incompatibilists should want their view to accord with pretheoretical intuitions, we suggest that determining whether incompatibilism is in fact intuitive calls for empirical testing. We then present the results of our studies, which (...)
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  14. David Morris, Andrew Robinson & Catherine Duchastel, Concordance of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception.score: 30.0
    This is a concordance of page numbers in the following editions of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: English editions prior to the Routledge Classics 2002; Routledge Classics edition, with the new pagination; the French edition from Gallimard, prior to 2005; the 2e edition from Gallimard, 2005, with new pagination.
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  15. J. S. Morris, A. Ohman & Raymond J. Dolan (1998). Conscious and Unconscious Emotional Learning in the Human Amygdala. Nature 393:467-470.score: 30.0
  16. Eddy A. Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2005). Surveying Freedom: Folk Intuitions About Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Psychology 18 (5):561-584.score: 30.0
    Philosophers working in the nascent field of ‘experimental philosophy’ have begun using methods borrowed from psychology to collect data about folk intuitions concerning debates ranging from action theory to ethics to epistemology. In this paper we present the results of our attempts to apply this approach to the free will debate, in which philosophers on opposing sides claim that their view best accounts for and accords with folk intuitions. After discussing the motivation for such research, we describe our methodology of (...)
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  17. David Morris (2004). The Sense of Space. State University of New York Press.score: 30.0
    Drawing on the philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Bergon, as well as contemporary psychology to develop a renewed account of the moving, perceiving body, the ...
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  18. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2004). The Phenomenology of Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):162-179.score: 30.0
    Philosophers often suggest that their theories of free will are supported by our phenomenology. Just as their theories conflict, their descriptions of the phenomenology of free will often conflict as well. We suggest that this should motivate an effort to study the phenomenology of free will in a more systematic way that goes beyond merely the introspective reports of the philosophers themselves. After presenting three disputes about the phenomenology of free will, we survey the (limited) psychological research on the experiences (...)
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  19. Christopher W. Morris (2005). Natural Rights and Political Legitimacy. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):314-329.score: 30.0
    If we have a natural right to liberty, it is hard to see how a state could be legitimate without first obtaining the (genuine) consent of the governed. I consider the threat natural rights pose to state legitimacy. I distinguish minimal from full legitimacy and explore different understandings of the nature of our natural rights. Even though I conclude that natural rights do threaten the full legitimacy of states, I suggest that understanding our natural right to liberty to be grounded (...)
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  20. Michael Morris (2006). Akrasia in the "Protagoras" and the "Republic&Quot;. Phronesis 51 (3):195 - 229.score: 30.0
    Although it is a commonplace that the "Protagoras" and the "Republic" present diffent views of akrasia, the nature of the difference is not well understood. I argue that the logic of the famous argument in the "Protagoras" turns just on two crucial assumptions: that desiring is having evaluative beliefs (or that valuing is desiring), and that no one can have contradictory preferences at the same time; hedonism is not essential to the logic of the argument. And the logic of the (...)
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  21. Michael Morris & Julian Dodd (2009). Mysticism and Nonsense in the Tractatus. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):247-276.score: 30.0
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  22. David Morris (2005). Animals and Humans, Thinking and Nature. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):49-72.score: 30.0
    Studies that compare human and animal behaviour suspend prejudices about mind, body and their relation, by approaching thinking in terms of behaviour. Yet comparative approaches typically engage another prejudice, motivated by human social and bodily experience: taking the lone animal as the unit of comparison. This prejudice informs Heidegger’s and Merleau-Ponty’s comparative studies, and conceals something important: that animals moving as a group in an environment can develop new sorts of “sense.” The study of animal group-life suggests a new way (...)
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  23. David Morris (2007). Faces and the Invisible of the Visible: Toward an Animal Ontology. Phaenex 2 (2):124-169.score: 30.0
    This paper studies the role of faces in animal life to gain insight into Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, especially his later ontology. The relation between animal faces and moving, animal bodies involves a peculiar, expressive logic. This logic echoes the physiognomic structure of perception that Merleau-Ponty detects in his earlier philosophy, and exemplifies and clarifies a logic elemental to his later ontology, especially to his concept of an invisible that is of (endogenous to) the visible. The question why the logic of the (...)
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  24. Thomas V. Morris (1988). Dependence and Divine Simplicity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (3):161 - 174.score: 30.0
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  25. David Morris (1999). Edward S. Casey: Getting Back Into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World and Edward S. Casey: The Fate of Place: A Philosophical History. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):37-48.score: 30.0
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  26. Stephen G. Morris (2007). Neuroscience and the Free Will Conundrum. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):20 – 22.score: 30.0
  27. William Edward Morris (2009). Meaning(Fullness) Without Metaphysics: Another Look at Hume's “Meaning Empiricism”. Philosophia 37 (3):441-454.score: 30.0
    Although Hume has no developed semantic theory, in the heyday of analytic philosophy he was criticized for his “meaning empiricism,” which supposedly committed him to a private world of ideas, led him to champion a genetic account of meaning instead of an analytic one, and confused “impressions” with “perceptions of an objective realm.” But another look at Hume’s “meaning empiricism” reveals that his criterion for cognitive content, the cornerstone both of his resolutely anti-metaphysical stance and his naturalistic “science of human (...)
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  28. David Morris (2008). Diabetes, Chronic Illness and the Bodily Roots of Ecstatic Temporality. Human Studies 31 (4):399 - 421.score: 30.0
    This article studies the phenomenology of chronic illness in light of phenomenology’s insights into ecstatic temporality and freedom. It shows how a chronic illness can, in lived experience, manifest itself as a disturbance of our usual relation to ecstatic temporality and thence as a disturbance of freedom. This suggests that ecstatic temporality is related to another sort of time—“provisional time”—that is in turn rooted in the body. The article draws on Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception and Heidegger’s Being and Time , (...)
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  29. Gordon Baker & Katherine J. Morris (2004). The Meditations and the Logic of Testimony. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):23 – 41.score: 30.0
  30. Katherine J. Morris (1984). In Defense of Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Noonan. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):399-412.score: 30.0
    Noonan's arguments against methodological solipsism ("methodological solipsism," "philosophical studies" 4, 1981) assumes that mental states are individuated by (russellian) content; this assumption entails that narrowness and wideness are intrinsic to mental states. I propose an alternative "extrinsic" reading of methodological solipsism, According to which narrowness and wideness are modes of attribution of mental states, And thus reject the doctrine of individuation by russellian content. Noonan's arguments fail against this version of methodological solipsism.
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  31. Katherine Morris (1998). Sartre on the Existence of Others on `Treating Sartre Analytically'. Sartre Studies International 4 (1):46-62.score: 30.0
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  32. William Edward Morris (2000). Hume's Conclusion. Philosophical Studies 99 (1):89-110.score: 30.0
  33. M. Morris (1991). Why There Are No Mental Representations. Minds and Machines 1 (1):1-30.score: 30.0
    I argue that there are no mental representations, in the sense of “representation” used in standard computational theories of the mind. I take Cummins' Meaning and Mental Representation as my stalking-horse, and argue that his view, once properly developed, is self-defeating. The argument implicitly undermines Fodor's view of the mind; I draw that conclusion out explicitly. The idea of mental representations can then only be saved by appeal to a Dennett-like instrumentalism; so I argue against that too. Finally, I argue (...)
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  34. Kevin Morris (2009). Does Functional Reduction Need Bridge Laws? A Response to Marras. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):647-657.score: 30.0
    In his recent article ‘Consciousness and Reduction’, Ausonio Marras argues that functional reduction must appeal to bridge laws and thus does not represent a genuine alternative to Nagelian reduction. In response, I first argue that even if functional reduction must use bridge laws, it still represents a genuine alternative to Nagelian reduction. Further, I argue that Marras does not succeed in showing that functional reduction must use bridge laws. Introduction Nagelian Reduction, Functional Reduction, and Bridge Laws Marras on Functional Reduction (...)
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  35. Thomas V. Morris (1986). Perfection and Power. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):165 - 168.score: 30.0
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  36. Charles W. Morris (1938). Peirce, Mead, and Pragmatism. Philosophical Review 47 (2):109-127.score: 30.0
  37. David Morris (2002). Thinking the Body, From Hegel's Speculative Logic of Measure to Dynamic Systems Theory. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (3):182-197.score: 30.0
    A study of shifts in scientific strategies for measuring the living body, especially in dynamic systems theory: (1) sheds light on Hegel's concept of measure in The Science of Logic, and the dialectical transition from categories of being to categories of essence; (2) shows how Hegel's speculative logic anticipates and analyzes key tensions in scientific attempts to measure and conceive the dynamic agency of the body. The study's analysis of the body as having an essentially dynamic identity irreducible (...)
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  38. Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.) (1998). Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Greg Kavka (1947-1994) was a prominent and influential figure in contemporary moral and political philosophy. The new essays in this volume are concerned with fundamental issues of rational commitment and social justice to which Kavka devoted his work as a philosopher. The essays take Kavka's work as a point of departure and seek to advance the respective debates. The topics include: the relationship between intention and moral action as part of which Kavka's famous 'toxin puzzle' is a focus of discussion, (...)
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  39. Michael Morris (1992). Beyond Interpretation: Reply to Cummins' Response. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 2 (1):85-95.score: 30.0
    In his response to my Why There Are No Mental Representations, Robert Cummins accused me of having misinterpreted his views, and attempted to undermine a crucial premise of my argument, which claimed that one could only define a semantic type non-semantically by stipulating which tokens should receive a uniform interpretation. I respond to the charge and defend the premise.
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  40. Warren Frederick Morris (2002). Escaping Alienation: A Philosophy of Alienation and Dealienation. University Press of America.score: 30.0
    Escaping Alienation is a work of philosophical anthropology providing a theory of alienation and its opposite, dealienation.
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  41. Katherine J. Morris (1994). The `Context Principle' in the Later Wittgenstein. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):294-310.score: 30.0
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  42. Sean A. Weaver & Michael C. Morris (2005). Risks Associated with Genetic Modification: – An Annotated Bibliography of Peer Reviewed Natural Science Publications. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):157-189.score: 30.0
    We present an annotated bibliography of peer reviewed scientific research highlighting the human health, animal welfare, and environmental risks associated with genetic modification. Risks associated with the expression of the transgenic material include concerns over resistance and non-target effects of crops expressing Bt toxins, consequences of herbicide use associated with genetically modified herbicide-tolerant plants, and transfer of gene expression from genetically modified crops through vertical and horizontal gene transfer. These risks are not connected to the technique of genetic modification as (...)
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  43. Michael Morris (2000). Metaphor and Philosophy: An Encounter with Derrida. Philosophy 75 (2):225-244.score: 30.0
    This paper presents a critical analysis of the central argument of Derrida's paper 'White Mythology'. The crucial claims are that the concept of metaphor presupposes philosophy, that philosophy presupposes the concept of metaphor, and that philosophy cannot accommodate the concept of metaphor. I offer support for the first two claims, explaining the general kind of view of philosophy and of metaphor which they require, but I argue that even if we grant the first two claims, the concept of metaphor only (...)
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  44. Charles W. Morris (1993). Symbolism and Reality: A Study in the Nature of Mind. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    PARTI FOREWORD "Knowledge of a thing engenders love of it; the more exact the knowledge, the more fervent the love." Leonardo Da Vinci ) The stream of ...
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  45. Thomas V. Morris (1985). Necessary Beings. Mind 94 (374):263-272.score: 30.0
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  46. W. T. Morris (1989). Conventionalism in Physics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):135-136.score: 30.0
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  47. Katherine J. Morris (1996). Pain, Injury, and First/Third-Person Asymmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):125-56.score: 30.0
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  48. Christopher W. Morris & Arthur Ripstein (eds.) (2001). Practical Rationality and Preference: Essays for David Gauthier. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    What are preferences and are they reasons for action? Is it rational to cooperate with others even if that entails acting against one's preferences? The dominant position in philosophy on the topic of practical rationality is that one acts so as to maximize the satisfaction of one's preferences. This view is most closely associated with the work of David Gauthier, and in this new collection of essays some of the most innovative philosophers currently working in this field explore the controversies (...)
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  49. Charles Morris (1948). Signs About Signs About Signs. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9 (1):115-133.score: 30.0
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  50. Bertram Morris (1965). Possessive Individualism and Political Realities:The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke C. B. MacPherson. Ethics 75 (3):207-.score: 30.0
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