Search results for 'Jens Erling Birch' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jens Erling Birch (2011). Skills and Knowledge - Nothing but Memory? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (4):362 - 378.score: 870.0
    The aim of this article is to enquire into neuroscientific research on memory and relate it to topics of skill, knowledge and consciousness. The article outlines some contemporary theories on procedural and working memory, and discusses what contributions they give to sport science and philosophy of sport. It is argued that memory research gives important insights to the neuronal structures and events involved in knowledge and consciousness contributing to sport skills, but that these explanations are not exhaustive. The article argues (...)
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  2. Jens E. Birch (2009). A Phenomenal Case for Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (1):30-48.score: 240.0
    The article attempts to show some limitations to reductive accounts in science and philosophy of body-mind relations, experience and skill. Extensive literature has developed in analytic philosophy of mind recently due to new technology and theories in the neurosciences. In the sporting sciences, there are also attempts to reduce experiences and skills to biology, mechanics, chemistry and physiology. The article argues there are three fundamental problems for reductive accounts that lead to an explanatory gap between the reduction and the conscious (...)
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  3. Jens E. Birch (2011). The Inner Game of Sport: Is Everything in the Brain? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):284-305.score: 240.0
    The article deals with the following: (1) Three brain imaging studies on athletes are evaluated. What do these neuroscientific studies tell us about the brain and mind of the athlete? (2) Empirical investigations will need a neuro-theory of mind if they are to make the leap from neural activity to the mental. The article looks at such a theory, Gerald Edelman's ?Neural Darwinism?. What are the implications of such a theory for sport science and philosophy of sport? (3) The article (...)
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  4. Charles Birch (1999). Why I Became a Panexperientialist. Australasian Association for Process Thought.score: 30.0
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  5. Anthony Birch (2007). Waismann's Critique of Wittgenstein. Analysis and Metaphysics 6 (2007):263-272.score: 30.0
    Friedrich Waismann, a little-known mathematician and onetime student of Wittgenstein's, provides answers to problems that vexed Wittgenstein in his attempt to explicate the foundations of mathematics through an analysis of its practice. Waismann argues in favor of mathematical intuition and the reality of infinity with a Wittgensteinian twist. Waismann's arguments lead toward an approach to the foundation of mathematics that takes into consideration the language and practice of experts.
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  6. Jonathan Birch (2012). The Negative View of Natural Selection. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):569-573.score: 30.0
    An influential argument due to Elliott Sober, subsequently strengthened by Denis Walsh and Joel Pust, moves from plausible premises to the bold conclusion that natural selection cannot explain the traits of individual organisms. If the argument were sound, the explanatory scope of selection would depend, surprisingly, on metaphysical considerations concerning origin essentialism. I show that the Sober-Walsh-Pust argument rests on a flawed counterfactual criterion for explanatory relevance. I further show that a more defensible criterion for explanatory relevance recently proposed by (...)
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  7. Jonathan Birch (2012). Robust Processes and Teleological Language. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (3):299-312.score: 30.0
    I consider some hitherto unexplored examples of teleological language in the sciences. In explicating these examples, I aim to show (a) that such language is not the sole preserve of the biological sciences, and (b) that not all such talk is reducible to the ascription of functions. In chemistry and biochemistry, scientists explaining molecular rearrangements and protein folding talk informally of molecules rearranging “in order to” maximize stability. Evolutionary biologists, meanwhile, often speak of traits evolving “in order to” optimize some (...)
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  8. Jonathan Birch (2009). Irretrievably Confused? Innateness in Explanatory Context. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (4):296-301.score: 30.0
    The hunt for a biologically respectable definition for the folk concept of innateness is still on. I defend Ariew’s Canalization account of innateness against the criticisms of Griffiths and Machery, but highlight the remaining flaws in this proposal. I develop a new analysis based on the notion of environmental induction. A trait is innate, I argue, iff it is not environmentally induced. I augment this definition with a novel analysis of environmental induction that draws on the contrastive nature of causal (...)
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  9. Jonathan Birch (2012). Social Revolution. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):571-581.score: 30.0
    Andrew Bourke’s Principles of Social Evolution identifies three stages that characterize an evolutionary transition in individuality and deploys inclusive fitness theory to explain each stage. The third stage, social group transformation, has hitherto received relatively little attention from inclusive fitness theorists. In this review, I first discuss Bourke’s “virtual dominance” hypothesis for the evolution of the germ line. I then contrast Bourke’s inclusive fitness approach to the major transitions with the multi-level approach developed by Richard Michod, Samir Okasha and others. (...)
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  10. Thomas H. Birch (1990). The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness Areas as Prisons. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):3-26.score: 30.0
    Even with the very best intentions , Western culture’s approach to wilderness and wildness, the otherness of nature, tends to be one of imperialistic domination and appropriation. Nevertheless, in spite of Western culture’s attempt to gain total control over nature by imprisoning wildness in wilderness areas, which are meant to be merely controlled “simulations” of wildness, a real wildness, a real otherness, can still be found in wilderness reserves . This wildness can serve as the literal ground for the subversion (...)
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  11. Jonathan Birch (2013). On the 'Simulation Argument' and Selective Scepticism. Erkenntnis 78 (1):95-107.score: 30.0
    Nick Bostrom’s ‘Simulation Argument’ purports to show that, unless we are confident that advanced ‘posthuman’ civilizations are either extremely rare or extremely rarely interested in running simulations of their own ancestors, we should assign significant credence to the hypothesis that we are simulated. I argue that Bostrom does not succeed in grounding this constraint on credence. I first show that the Simulation Argument requires a curious form of selective scepticism, for it presupposes that we possess good evidence for claims about (...)
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  12. Jonathan Birch (2014). Hamilton's Rule and Its Discontents. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):381-411.score: 30.0
    In an incendiary 2010 Nature article, M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita, and E. O. Wilson present a savage critique of the best-known and most widely used framework for the study of social evolution, W. D. Hamilton’s theory of kin selection. More than a hundred biologists have since rallied to the theory’s defence, but Nowak et al. maintain that their arguments ‘stand unrefuted’. Here I consider the most contentious claim Nowak et al. defend: that Hamilton’s rule, the core explanatory principle (...)
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  13. Thomas H. Birch (1993). Moral Considerability and Universal Consideration. Environmental Ethics 15 (4):313-332.score: 30.0
    One of the central, abiding, and unresolved questions in environmental ethics has focused on the criterion for moral considerability or practical respect. In this essay, I call that question itself into question and argue that the search for this criterion should be abandoned because (1) it presupposes the ethical legitimacy of the Western project of planetary domination, (2) the philosophical methods that are andshould be used to address the question properly involve giving consideration in a root sense to everything, (3) (...)
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  14. Jonathan Birch (2012). Collective Action in the Fraternal Transitions. Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):363-380.score: 30.0
    Inclusive fitness theory was not originally designed to explain the major transitions in evolution, but there is a growing consensus that it has the resources to do so. My aim in this paper is to highlight, in a constructive spirit, the puzzles and challenges that remain. I first consider the distinctive aspects of the cooperative interactions we see within the most complex social groups in nature: multicellular organisms and eusocial insect colonies. I then focus on one aspect in particular: the (...)
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  15. Kean Birch (2007). Review of Kaushik Sunder Rajan, Biocapital: The Constitution of Postgenomic Life. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):67-69.score: 30.0
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  16. Jonathan Birch (2014). How Cooperation Became the Norm. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):433-444.score: 30.0
    Most of the contributions to Cooperation and Its Evolution grapple with the distinctive challenges presented by the project of explaining human sociality. Many of these puzzles have a ‘chicken and egg’ character: our virtually unparalleled capacity for large-scale cooperation is the product of psychological, behavioural, and demographic changes in our recent evolutionary history, and these changes are linked by complex patterns of reciprocal dependence. There is much we do not yet understand about the timing of these changes, and about the (...)
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  17. Jonathan Birch (forthcoming). Propositional Content in Signalling Systems. Philosophical Studies:1-20.score: 30.0
    Skyrms, building on the work of Dretske, has recently developed a novel information-theoretic account of propositional content in simple signalling systems. Information-theoretic accounts of content traditionally struggle to accommodate the possibility of misrepresentation, and I show that Skyrms’s account is no exception. I proceed to argue, however, that a modified version of Skyrms’s account can overcome this problem. On my proposed account, the propositional content of a signal is determined not by the information that it actually carries, but by the (...)
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  18. Jonathan Birch (2013). Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (Eds) Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Cooperation, and Strategic Behaviour. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):669-673.score: 30.0
  19. T. Bruce Birch (1936). The Theory of Continuity of William of Ockham. Philosophy of Science 3 (4):494-505.score: 30.0
  20. Kean Birch (2005). Beneficence, Determinism and Justice: An Engagement with the Argument for the Genetic Selection of Intelligence. Bioethics 19 (1):12–28.score: 30.0
  21. Brian Birch & Patrick Horn (2007). Religion and Friendly Fire: Examining Assumptions in Contemporary Philosophy of Religion – by D. Z. Phillips. Philosophical Investigations 30 (3):323–333.score: 30.0
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  22. Marianna Papadopoulou & Roy Birch (2009). 'Being in the World': The Event of Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):270-286.score: 30.0
    This paper employs an eclectic mix of paradigms in order to discuss constituting characteristics of young children's learning experiences. Drawing upon a phenomenological perspective it examines learning as a form of 'Being' and as the result of learners' engagement with the world in their own, unique, intentional manners. The learners' intentions towards their world are expressed in everyday activity and participation. A social constructivist perspective is thus employed to present learning as situated in meaningful socio-cultural contexts of the everyday, lived (...)
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  23. Samuel C. M. Birch (2013). The Dead Donor Rule: A Defense. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):426-440.score: 30.0
    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the “dead donor rule,” the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are (...)
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  24. Jennifer S. Savage, Jennifer Orlet Fisher & Leann L. Birch (2007). Parental Influence on Eating Behavior: Conception to Adolescence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):22-34.score: 30.0
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  25. Charles Birch (1988). Whitehead and Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (2):33–41.score: 30.0
  26. Mary Birch, Deni Elliott & Mary A. Trankel (1999). Black and White and Shades of Gray: A Portrait of the Ethical Professor. Ethics and Behavior 9 (3):243 – 261.score: 30.0
  27. Jonathan Birch (2013). Explaining the Human Syndrome. [REVIEW] Metascience 22 (2):347-350.score: 30.0
  28. Timmermann Jens (2000). Warum scheint transzendentale Freiheit absurd? Eine Notiz zum Beweis für die Antithesis der 3. Antinomie. Kant-Studien 91 (1):8-16.score: 30.0
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  29. Jonathan Birch (2014). Has Grafen Formalized Darwin? Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):175-180.score: 30.0
    One key aim of Grafen’s Formal Darwinism project is to formalize ‘modern biology’s understanding and updating of Darwin’s central argument’. In this commentary, I consider whether Grafen has succeeded in this aim.
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  30. James W. Birch (1983). Commentary: Reflections on Police Corruption. Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (2):2-85.score: 30.0
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  31. Peter Birch (1958). The Proximate Aim of Education. Philosophical Studies 8:236-237.score: 30.0
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  32. Mark Child, David D. Williams, A. Jane Birch & Robert M. Boody (1995). Autonomy or Heteronomy? Levinas's Challenge to Modernism and Postmodernism. Educational Theory 45 (2):167-189.score: 30.0
  33. Charles Birch (1973). A Biological Basis for Human Purpose. Zygon 8 (3-4):244-260.score: 30.0
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  34. Christopher Birch (2000). Memory and Punishment. Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (2):17-31.score: 30.0
  35. Charles Birch (1971). Purpose in the Universe: A Search for Wholeness. Zygon 6 (1):4-26.score: 30.0
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  36. Charles Birch (1981). The Liberation of Life: From the Cell to the Community. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This book is about the liberation of the concept of life from the bondage fashioned by the interpreters of life ever since biology began, and about the liberation of the life of humans and non-humans alike from the bondage of social structures and behaviour, which now threatens the fullness of life's possibilities if not survival itself. It falls into a tradition of writings about human problems from a perspective informed by biology. It rejects the mechanistic model of life dominant in (...)
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  37. R. A. Birch (1981). The Settlement of 26 June A.D. 4 and its Aftermath. Classical Quarterly 31 (02):443-.score: 30.0
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  38. Valerie A. Kuhlmeier & Susan A. J. Birch (2005). Steps Toward Categorizing Motivation: Abilities, Limitations, and Conditional Constraints. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):706-707.score: 30.0
    Tomasello et al. have not characterized the motivation underlying shared intentionality, and we hope to encourage research on this topic by offering comparative paradigms and specific empirical questions. Although we agree that nonhuman primates differ greatly from us in terms of shared intentionality, we caution against concluding that they lack all aspects of it before other empirical tools have been exhausted. In addition, identifying the conditions in which humans spontaneously engage in shared intentionality, and the conditions in which we fail, (...)
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  39. Thomas H. Birch (1990). Neil Evernden: The Natural Alien. Environmental Ethics 12 (3):283-287.score: 30.0
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  40. Herbert G. Birch & Herbert S. Rabinowitz (1951). The Negative Effect of Previous Experience on Productive Thinking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (2):121.score: 30.0
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  41. Kean Birch (2006). The Neoliberal Underpinnings of the Bioeconomy: The Ideological Discourses and Practices of Economic Competitiveness. Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (3):1-15.score: 30.0
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  42. Charles Birch (1974). Chance, Necessity and Purpose. In F. Ayala & T. Dobzhansky (eds.), Studies in the Philosophy of Biology. University of California Press. 225--239.score: 30.0
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  43. Andrea Croce Birch (1991). Physical Cosmology and Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 44 (3):646-647.score: 30.0
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  44. David G. W. Birch (2008). Psychic ID: A Blueprint for a Modern National Identity Scheme. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):189-201.score: 30.0
    The issue of identity cards is hotly debated in many countries, but it often seems to be an oddly backward-looking debate that presumes outdated “Orwellian” architectures. In the modern world, surely we should be debating the requirements for national identity management schemes, in which identity cards may or may not be a useful implementation, before we move on to architecture. If so, then, what should a U.K. national identity management scheme for the 21st century look like? Can we assemble a (...)
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  45. Andrea Croce Birch (1990). Peirce's Three Agruments for the Reality of God. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 64:203-210.score: 30.0
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  46. Brian D. Birch (2005). The CIA Leak Investigation. Teaching Ethics 6 (1):69-77.score: 30.0
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  47. R. A. Birch (1981). The Correspondence of Augustus: Some Notes on Suetonius, Tiberius 21. 4–7. Classical Quarterly 31 (01):155-.score: 30.0
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  48. Andrea Croce Birch (1988). The Cunning of Reason. Review of Metaphysics 42 (2):389-390.score: 30.0
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  49. Bernhard Erling (1974). The Aesthetic Context of Meaning in the Thought of Anders Nygren. International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):101-113.score: 30.0
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  50. Wolfgang Spiegel, Marie‐Theres Mlczoch‐Czerny, Rolf Jens & Christopher Dowrick (2012). Quality Circles for Pharmacotherapy to Modify General Practitioners' Prescribing Behaviour for Generic Drugs. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):828-834.score: 30.0
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