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  1. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (unknown). Why Can't Democracies Be Universal?: How Do Democracies Resolve Disagreement Over Citizenship? Philosophical Explorations:233-238.
  2. Allen Thompson & Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (eds.) (2012). Ethical Adaptation to Climate Change: Human Virtues of the Future. The Mit Press.
    This book takes a different perspective, exploring the idea that the challenge of adapting to global climate change is fundamentally an ethical one, that it is not simply a matter of adapting our infrastructures and economies to mitigate ...
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  3. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2010). Species Extinction and the Vice of Thoughtlessness: The Importance of Spiritual Exercises for Learning Virtue. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):61-83.
    In this paper, I present a sample spiritual exercise—a contemporary form of the written practice that ancient philosophers used to shape their characters. The exercise, which develops the ancient practice of the examination of conscience, is on the sixth mass extinction and seeks to understand why the extinction appears as a moral wrong. It concludes by finding a vice in the moral character of the author and the author’s society. From a methodological standpoint, the purpose of spiritual exercises is to (...)
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  4. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2006). The Ecological Life: Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  5. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2006). Why Can't Democracies Be Universal? Social Philosophy Today 22:233-238.
  6. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2005). Courtrooms As Disabling Remembering Positions. Social Philosophy Today 21:253-256.
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  7. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2005). Common Humanity and Human Rights. Social Philosophy Today 21:51-62.
    Many people, often students, appear apathetic because they do not know how to support human rights. In this paper, I explore a question that is part of a larger project helping people think through moral life in the age of human rights. What are appropriate contexts for invoking human rights? I begin with two assumptions: (1) Our sense of common humanity is the source of human rights. (2) There are situations where it seems we should disregard human rights out of (...)
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  8. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2003). Environmental Maturity. Social Theory and Practice 29 (3):499-514.
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  9. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2003). Main Currents in Western Environmental Thought: Skeptical Environmentalism: The Limits of Philosophy and Science. Social Theory and Practice 29 (3).
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  10. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2003). The Idea of an Ecological Orientation. Social Philosophy Today 19:55-63.
    In this paper, I do two things. First, I interpret a cultural shift in our understanding of what it is to be human. I focus on the self-understanding in three international documents: (1) The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), (2) The Rio Charter on Sustainable Development (1992), and (3) The Earth Charter (2002). These documents are symptomatic: what it is to be human shifts from not considering environmental issues as central to our humanity to understanding respect for the environment (...)
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  11. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2002). A Sense of Ecological Humanity. Social Philosophy Today 18:125-136.
    Many cultures understand that being a flourishing human involves respectful relationships with the wider universe of life on Earth. Call this, “a sense of ecological humanity.” In this paper, I explore conceptual resources available for developing such a way of being. To this end, I explore two modes of practical reasoning. The first is analogical extension, which understands the respect due human life as the source of a like respect for non-human life. The second is analogical implication, which comes to (...)
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  12. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2001). Analogical Extension and Analogical Implication in Environmental Moral Philosophy. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):149-158.
    Two common claims in environmental moral philosophy are that nature is worthy of respect and that we respect ourselves in respecting nature. In this paper, I articulate two modes of practical reasoning that help make sense of these claims. The first is analogical extension, which understands the respect due human life as the source of a like respect for nature. The second is analogical implication, which involves nature in human life to show us what we are like. These forms of (...)
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