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  1. Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Des Klass (forthcoming). Knowledge and the Climate Change Issue: An Exploratory Study of Cluster and Extra-Cluster Effects. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  2. Jeremy Galbreath (2013). ESG in Focus: The Australian Evidence. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):529-541.
    Addressing ESG issues has become a point of interest for investors, shareholders, and governments as a risk management concern, while for firms it has become an emerging part of competitive strategy. In this study, a database from an independent ratings agency is used to examine, longitudinally, how Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) 300 firms are responding to ESG issues. Following institutional theory predictions, ASX300 firms are improving ESG performance over the 2002–2009 timeframe. Furthermore, over this timeframe, performance on the governance dimension (...)
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  3. Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Des Klass (2013). Knowledge and the Climate Change Issue: An Exploratory Study of Cluster and Extra-Cluster Effects. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Climate change, while potentially impacting many industries, appears to have considerable significance to the wine industry. Yet little is known about how firms acquire knowledge and gain an understanding of climate change and its impacts. This study, exploratory in nature and studying firms from the wine-producing region of Tasmania, is one of the first in the management literature to use cluster theory to examine the climate change issue. Firms are predicted to exchange knowledge about climate change more readily with other (...)
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  4. Jeremy Galbreath (2011). To What Extent is Business Responding to Climate Change? Evidence From a Global Wine Producer. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):421-432.
    Most studies on climate change response have examined reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Yet these studies do not take into account ecosystem services constraints and biophysical disruptions wrought by climate change that may require broader types of response. By studying a firm in the wine industry and using a research approach not constrained by structured methodologies or biased toward GHG emissions, the findings suggest that both “inside out” and “outside in” actions are taken in response to climate change. While (...)
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  5. Jeremy Galbreath (2006). Are Organisation Researchers Too Obsessed with the Economic Responsibility of the Firm? Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):287 - 295.
    The original intent of business education in America focused on the development of professional managers who would look after the interests of society. As economic and shareholder theories influenced business education, firm performance became the manager’s top – if not only – priority. The economic responsibility of the firm also appears to be dominating scholarly interest in organisations as well. However, business firms constitute part of the fabric of society and closer attention should be paid by organisation researchers to the (...)
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