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  1. Andreas Rasche, Frank G. A. De Bakker & Jeremy Moon (2013). Complete and Partial Organizing for Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):651-663.
    This paper investigates different modes of organizing for corporate social responsibility (CSR). Based on insights from organization theory, we theorize two ways to organize for CSR. “Complete” organization for CSR happens within businesses and depends on the availability of certain organizational elements (e.g., membership, hierarchy, rules, monitoring, and sanctioning). By contrast, “partial” organization for CSR happens when organizers do not have direct access to all these organizational elements. We discuss partial organization for CSR by analyzing how standards and cross-sector partnerships (...)
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  2. Glen Whelan, Jeremy Moon & Bettina Grant (2013). Corporations and Citizenship Arenas in the Age of Social Media. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):777-790.
    Little attention has been paid to the importance of social media in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature. This deficit is redressed in the present paper through utilizing the notion of ‘citizenship arenas’ to identify three dynamics in social media-augmented corporate–society relations. First, we note that social media-augmented ‘corporate arenas of citizenship’ are constructed by individual corporations in an effort to address CSR issues of specific importance thereto, and are populated by individual citizens as well as (functional/formally organized) stakeholders. Second, (...)
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  3. Krista Bondy, Jeremy Moon & Dirk Matten (2012). An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):281-299.
    This article investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an institution within UK multi-national corporations (MNCs). In the context of the literature on the institutionalization of CSR and on critical CSR, it presents two main findings. First, it contributes to the CSR mainstream literature by confirming that CSR has not only become institutionalized in society but that a form of this institution is also present within MNCs. Secondly, it contributes to the critical CSR literature by suggesting that unlike broader notions of (...)
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  4. Roger Murphy, Namrata Sharma & Jeremy Moon (2012). Empowering Students to Engage with Responsible Business Thinking and Practices. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (2):313-330.
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  5. Jeremy Moon & Xi Shen (2010). CSR in China Research: Salience, Focus and Nature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):613 - 629.
    This article investigates the development of research in the field of CSR in China. The justification for this is that (i) there is evidence that CSR is emerging as a management practice and management field internationally; (ii) there is a general interest in the distinctiveness or comparability of management and management research in Asia and China; (iii) there is evidence that CSR is growing as a management issue in China; and (iv) yet, the mainsprings of this are very different from (...)
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  6. Jeremy Moon, Stephanos Anastasiadis & Federica Viganò (2009). The Potential of Csr to Support the Implementation of the Eu Sustainability Strategy: Editorial Introduction. Business Ethics 18 (3):268-272.
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  7. Judy N. Muthuri, Wendy Chapple & Jeremy Moon (2009). An Integrated Approach to Implementing 'Community Participation' in Corporate Community Involvement: Lessons From Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):431 - 444.
    Corporate community involvement (CCI) is often regarded as means of development in developing countries. However, CCI is often criticised for patronage and insensitivity both to context and local priorities. A key concern is the extent of 'community participation' in corporate social decision-making. Community participation in CCI offers an opportunity for these criticisms to be addressed. This paper presents findings of research examining community participation in CCI governance undertaken by Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. We draw on socio-political governance and interaction (...)
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  8. Glen Whelan, Jeremy Moon & Marc Orlitzky (2009). Human Rights, Transnational Corporations and Embedded Liberalism: What Chance Consensus? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):367 - 383.
    This article contextualises current debates over human rights and transnational corporations. More specifically, we begin by first providing the background to John Ruggie's appointment as 'Special Representative of the Secretary-General on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises'. Second, we provide a brief discussion of the rise of transnational corporations, and of their growing importance in terms of global governance. Third, we introduce the notion of human rights, and note some difficulties associated therewith. Fourth, we (...)
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  9. Dirk Matten, Andrew Crane & Jeremy Moon (2006). Cosmopolitan Citizenship and the Corporation. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:127-132.
    This paper, based on our forthcoming book (Crane, Matten, & Moon, 2007), examines the effects of globalization on reconfiguring notions of citizenship and the role of corporations in influencing, and being influenced by, this process. Based on an analysis of the literature on global citizenship, we explore the current and potential role for corporations in contributing to global governance systems and processes, both independent of, and in conjunction with, governmental and non-governmental organizations.
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  10. M. Chappel & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Asia: A Seven Country Study of CSR. Business and Society 44 (4).
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  11. Wendy Chapple & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Asia A Seven-Country Study of CSR Web Site Reporting. Business and Society 44 (4):415-441.
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  12. Kate Grosser & Jeremy Moon (2005). Gender Mainstreaming and Corporate Social Responsibility: Reporting Workplace Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):327 - 340.
    This paper investigates the potential and actual contribution of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to gender equality in a framework of gender mainstreaming (GM). It introduces GM as combining technical systems (monitoring, reporting, evaluating) with political processes (women’s participation in decision-making) and considers the ways in which this is compatible with CSR agendas. It examines the inclusion of gender equality criteria within three related CSR tools: human capital management (HCM) reporting, CSR reporting guidelines, and socially responsible investment (SRI) criteria on employee (...)
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  13. Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):323-337.
    In the context of some criticism about social responsibility education in business schools, the paper reports findings from a survey of CSR education (teaching and research) in Europe. It analyses the extent of CSR education, the different ways in which it is defined and the levels at which it is taught. The paper provides an account of the efforts that are being made to mainstream CSR teaching and of the teaching methods deployed. It considers drivers of CSR courses, particularly the (...)
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  14. Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility Education in Europe. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):323 - 337.
    In the context of some criticism about social responsibility education in business schools, the paper reports findings from a survey of CSR education (teaching and research) in Europe. It analyses the extent of CSR education, the different ways in which it is defined and the levels at which it is taught. The paper provides an account of the efforts that are being made to mainstream CSR teaching and of the teaching methods deployed. It considers drivers of CSR courses, particularly the (...)
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  15. Jeremy Moon & Wendy Chapple (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Asia: A Seven-Country Study of CSR W. Business and Society 44 (4).
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  16. Jeremy Moon, Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2005). Can Corporations Be Citizens? Corporate Citizenship as a Metaphor for Business Participation in Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):429-453.
    This paper investigates whether, in theoretical terms, corporations can be citizens. The argument is based on the observation that thedebate on “corporate citizenship” (CC) has only paid limited attention to the actual notion of citizenship. Where it has been discussed, authors have either largely left the concept of CC unquestioned, or applied rather unidimensional and decontextualized notions of citizenship to the corporate sphere. The paper opens with a critical discussion of a major contribution to the CC literature, the work of (...)
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  17. Krista Bondy, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2004). The Adoption of Voluntary Codes of Conduct in MNCs: A Three‐Country Comparative Study. Business and Society Review 109 (4):449-477.
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  18. Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2004). Stakeholders as Citizens? Rethinking Rights, Participation, and Democracy. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):107-122.
    This paper reviews and analyses the implications of citizenship thinking for building ethical institutional arrangements for business. The paper looks at various stakeholder groups whose relation with the company changes quite significantly when one starts to conceptualize it in terms of citizenship. Rather than being simply stakeholders, we could see those groups either as citizens, or as other constituencies participating in the administration of citizenship for others, or in societal governance more broadly. This raises crucial questions about accountability and democracy (...)
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  19. Jeremy Moon & Bruce Stone (eds.) (2002). Power and Freedom in Modern Politics. University of Western Australia Press.
  20. Jeremy Moon (2001). Business Social Responsibility. Philosophy of Management 1 (3):35-45.
    The widespread association of business with maximising profit has tended to obscure its social dimension. Indeed some writers doubt whether business can ever be socially engaged and others claim that it should not. This paper seeks to show that besides seeking profit businesses can properly practise socialresponsibility, defined as involving themselves in their communities and engaging in non-profit activities. It explores the ways in which business social responsibility can contribute to social capital, the resources created by social bonds which members (...)
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