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Profile: Jerome Neu (University of California, Santa Cruz)
  1. Jerome Neu (2000). A Tear is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
    Is jealousy eliminable? If so, at what cost? What are the connections between pride the sin and the pride insisted on by identity politics? How can one question an individual's understanding of their own happiness or override a society's account of its own rituals? What is wrong with incest? These and other questions about what sustains and threatens our identity are pursued using the resources of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and other disciplines. The discussion throughout is informed and motivated by the Spinozist (...)
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  2.  5
    Jerome Neu (1977). Emotion, Thought, and Therapy. Routledge.
    This book is a study of Hume and Spinoza and the relationship of philosophical theories of the emotions to psychological theories of therapy. Arguing that Spinoza's cognitivist theory of emotions is closer to the truth, it is shown that that provides the beginning of an understanding of how Freudian or, more generally, analytic therapies make philosophic sense. That is, we can begin to understand how people's emotional lives might be transformed by consideration and interpretation of their memories, beliefs, fantasies; in (...)
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  3. Jerome Neu (1976). What is Wrong with Incest? Inquiry 19 (1-4):27 – 39.
    Incest taboos should be seen as involving non?sexual objections to sexual relations, that is, objections based on who people are in relation to each other, rather than their activities. What is at stake is brought out by considering certain objections to father?daughter incest and certain features of taboos. The objections that matter do not depend on social ties and distinctions having a biological basis, but there is nonetheless a biological element in incest taboos. To see it, one must look to (...)
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  4.  10
    Louise Antony, Owen McLeod, Paul Benson, Diane T. Meyers, Lawrence Blum, Albert Mosley, John P. Christman, Jerome Neu, John Doris & Marina Oshana (2002). Manuscript Referees for The Journal of Ethics Volume 6: November 2001–August 2002. Journal of Ethics 6 (411):411-411.
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  5.  35
    Jerome Neu (2008). Rehabilitating Resentment and Choosing What We Feel. Criminal Justice Ethics 27 (2):31-37.
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  6. Jerome Neu (1980). Jealous Thoughts. In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr 425--463.
    Is jealousy eliminable? At what cost? Must it be pathological? Distinctions between jealousy and envy (and between malicious and admiring envy) are explored, as are the psychological and social roots of both. Jealousy need not be mere possessiveness, it may have more to do with self-identity, and envy should not be confused with legitimate resentment of injustice. The relations of jealousy to claims of right, to certain underlying fears, and to certain forms of love are considered.
     
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  7.  34
    Jerome Neu (2002). An Ethics of Fantasy? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):133-157.
    Philosophical and popular ethics tend to focus on the question "What ought I to do?" Is there, in addition to the ethics of action, an ethics of fantasy? Are there fantasies one ought not to have? Of course there are fantasies with horrific content. Does it follow that there is something wrong with a person who has such fantasies or that they ought to make efforts to suppress them or to otherwise change themselves? Do the problems such fantasies raise depend (...)
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  8. Jerome Neu (2002). To Understand All Is to Forgive All—Or Is It? In Sharon Lamb & Jeffrie G. Murphy (eds.), Before Forgiving: Cautionary Views of Forgiveness in Psychotherapy. OUP Usa 17--38.
    Why should understanding lead to forgiveness? What is it about knowledge of the cause of an offense that makes it not an offense or less of an offense? Does such knowledge affect the character of the harm inflicted or does the forgiveness depend on other conditions of anger? And when should understanding lead to forgiveness? After all, every action has some explanation. Is any explanation enough for forgiveness, or are only certain ones of the appropriate kind? Which? What are the (...)
     
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  9.  57
    Jerome Neu (1971). Plato's Analogy of State and Individual: "The Republic" and the Organic Theory of the State. Philosophy 46 (177):238 - 254.
    “Imagine A rather short-sighted person told to read an inscription in small letters from some way off….' So begins the quest for “the real nature of justice and injustice” undertaken in response to the challenge of Glaucon and Adeimantus to show that “justice pays”. It is often alleged that the search leads through analogy to a monster “organic” state that lives by devouring individual rights. I believe that these charges are mistaken. Plato's political theory does not derive from an analogy (...)
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  10. Jerome Neu (2009). An Ethics of Emotion? In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. OUP Oxford
     
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  11. Jerome Neu (2000). A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Is jealousy eliminable? If so, at what cost? What are the connections between pride the sin and the pride insisted on by identity politics? How can one question an individual's understanding of their own happiness or override a society's account of its own rituals? What makes a sexual desire "perverse," or particular sexual relations undesirable or even unthinkable? These and other questions about what sustains and threatens our identity are pursued using the resources of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and other disciplines. The (...)
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  12. Jerome Neu (2011). On Loving Our Enemies. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge
    Christ would have us love our enemies. But can we choose what we feel? Can we make ourselves love someone because we think we should? What sort of “love” is it that is within our control? And ought we be so ready to foreswear resentment if it is based on moral wrongs? Self-respect, self-defense, and respect for the demands of morality may weigh against Christ’s injunction. There are questions of psychological possibility and of moral desirability—questions more inextricably intertwined than some (...)
     
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  13.  26
    Jerome Neu (1998). Pride and Identity. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):227-248.
    Christian theology still condemns the sin of pride, yet many modern political movements stake their claims in terms of pride (Black Pride, Gay Pride, Deaf Pride, etc.). In the age of identity politics, it would seem pride may help to overcome self-loathing and to transform society. To see the appropriate personal and political place of pride, one must properly understand the differing roles of responsibility and value in the constitution of pride. A distinction between self-respect and self-esteem also helps clarify (...)
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  14.  27
    Jerome Neu (2002). Reply to My Critics. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):159 - 171.
    In response to critical discussion of my book, A Tear Is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion, I clarify and develop various aspects of my analysis of jealousy in particular and affectivity in general. In relation to jealousy, I explore the nature of pathology, the role of fantasy and of the rival, and the place of examples and of evolutionary theory. In relation to affectivity, I emphasize the difference between distinguishing emotions from other psychological states and distinguishing among, within (...)
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  15.  18
    Jerome Neu (1988). Divided Minds: Sartre's "Bad Faith" Critique of Freud. Review of Metaphysics 42 (1):79 - 101.
  16.  20
    Jerome Neu (1998). Sexual Identity and Sexual Justice:Sexual Justice: Democratic Citizenship and the Politics of Desire. Morris B. Kaplan. Ethics 108 (3):586-.
  17.  8
    Jerome Neu (2009). Resentment Rising. Emotion Review 1 (1):31-32.
    Oatley's discussion of “resentment” in Othello works with an unfortunately impoverished notion of resentment, and the narrative of emergence and unfolding that he offers suffers from it. As explicated by Bishop Butler, John Rawls, and other philosophers, resentment rests on moral claims and is to be distinguished on that basis from envy and Nietzschean ressentiment. W. H. Auden, in “The Joker in the Pack,” provides more persuasive insight into the dark destructive malicious envy that motivates Iago. Such destructive aims are (...)
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  18.  13
    Jerome Neu (1984). Review Essay / Mental Illness and Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (2):62-67.
    Norval Morris, Madness and the Criminal Law Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1982, 235 pp.
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  19.  10
    Jerome Neu (2005). Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):741-744.
    Critical Notice of Robert C. Solomon's _Not Passion's Slave_ (2003, OUP).
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  20.  3
    Jerome Neu (1995). "Does the Professor Talk to God?": Learning From Little Hans. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (2):137-161.
    This essay argues that Freud’s case of Little Hans, while complicated by Hans’ father’s dual role in the analysis and in the Oedipal drama itself, provides valuable insight into the nature of psychoanalytic evidence and argument. The case provides direct, if sometimes ambiguous, evidence concerning primal phantasies and infantile sexuality--issues of universality, the role of experience, and the nature of phantasy are explored. Four strands of Freud’s analysis of Little Hans’ horse phobia are also explored. While the toxicological theory of (...)
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  21.  3
    Jerome Neu (1998). Sexual Identity and Sexual Justice. Ethics 108 (3):586.
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  22.  1
    Jerome Neu (1996). Sebastian Gardner., Irrationality and the Philosophy of Psychoanalysis. International Studies in Philosophy 28 (2):131-132.
  23.  8
    Jerome Neu (1991). Book Review:Innocence and Experience. Stuart Hampshire. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (1):155-.
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  24.  6
    Jerome Neu (1998). Review: Sexual Identity and Sexual Justice. [REVIEW] Ethics 108 (3):586 - 596.
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  25.  2
    Jerome Neu (1988). Book Review:The Politics of Mental Health Legislation. Clive Unsworth. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (1):174-.
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  26. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book's thirty essays explore philosophically the nature and morality of sexual perversion, cybersex, masturbation, homosexuality, contraception, same-sex marriage, promiscuity, pedophilia, date rape, sexual objectification, teacher-student relationships, pornography, and prostitution. Authors include Martha Nussbaum, Thomas Nagel, Alan Goldman, John Finnis, Sallie Tisdale, Robin West, Alan Wertheimer, John Corvino, Cheshire Calhoun, Jerome Neu, and Alan Soble, among others. A valuable resource for sex researchers as well as undergraduate courses in the philosophy of sex.
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  27. Jerome Neu (2000). A Tear is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion. OUP Usa.
    A Tear is an Intellectual Thing questions what sustains and threatens our identities, Using the resource of philosophy, psychoanalysis and a number of other disciplines.
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  28. Jerome Neu (2004). Emotions and Freedom. In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press
     
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  29. Jerome Neu (1978). Emotion, Thought & Therapy a Study of Hume and Spinoza and the Relationship of Philosophical Theories of the Emotions to Psychological Theories of Therapy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  30. Jerome Neu (1974). Emotion, Thought, and Therapy a Study of Hume, Spinoza, and Freud on Thought and Passion.
  31. Jerome Neu (2013). Freud, Sigmund. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
  32. Jerome Neu (1988). Life-Lies and Pipe Dreams, Self-Deception in Ibsen The'wild Duck'and Oneill The'iceman Cometh'. Philosophical Forum 19 (4):241-269.
    This essay uses plays by Ibsen and O’Neill to consider whether self-deception is always a bad thing, and whether undeceiving others is always a good (or easy) thing. There is a focus on the question of the possibility of mistake about one’s own present happiness, involving a consideration of the nature of happiness. There is a further focus on the role of collusion by others in self-deception, using a distinction between two types of self-deception: one characterized by inner conflict and (...)
     
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  33.  1
    Jerome Neu (2012). On Loving Our Enemies: Essays in Moral Psychology. OUP Usa.
    This book explores moral questions that go beyond the issues commonly considered in the ethics of action.
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  34. Jerome Neu (1971). Plato's Analogy of State and Individual: The Republic and the Organic Theory of the State. Philosophy 46 (177):238.
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  35.  31
    Jerome Neu (2007). Sticks and Stones: The Philosophy of Insults. Oxford University Press.
    In Sticks and Stones, philosopher Jerome Neu probes the nature, purpose, and effects of insults, exploring how and why they humiliate, embarrass, infuriate,...
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  36. Jerome Neu (2008). Sticks and Stones: The Philosophy of Insults. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The schoolyard wisdom about “sticks and stones” does not take one very far: insults do not take the form only of words, in truth even words have effects, and in the end the popular as well as the standard legal distinctions between speech and conduct are at least as problematic as they are helpful. To think clearly about how much we should put up with those who would put us down, it is necessary to explore the nature and place of (...)
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  37. Jerome Neu (ed.) (2006). The Cambridge Companion to Freud. Cambridge University Press.
    Does Freud still have something to teach us? The premise of this volume is that he most certainly does. Approaching Freud from not only the philosophical but also historical, psychoanalytical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives, the contributors show us how Freud gave us a new and powerful way to think about human thought and action. They consider the context of Freud's thought and the structure of his arguments to reveal how he made sense of ranges of experience generally neglected or misunderstood. (...)
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